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Space Programs North Korea

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July 20, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
North Korean leader Kim Jong Il has offered to abandon his country's rocket program if other states supply him with rockets to explore space, Russian President Vladimir V. Putin said in Pyongyang, the North Korean capital. The United States, which says North Korea is developing missiles that could be aimed at Washington, reacted with skepticism.
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NEWS
July 20, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
North Korean leader Kim Jong Il has offered to abandon his country's rocket program if other states supply him with rockets to explore space, Russian President Vladimir V. Putin said in Pyongyang, the North Korean capital. The United States, which says North Korea is developing missiles that could be aimed at Washington, reacted with skepticism.
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NEWS
December 26, 1998 | Associated Press
North Korea is preparing to launch another satellite despite international opposition, the country's official media reported Friday. North Korea fired a rocket Aug. 31 that flew over Japan and landed in the Pacific Ocean. It said the rocket launched a satellite. Japan has dismissed that claim, saying it was a ballistic missile.
NEWS
December 26, 1998 | Associated Press
North Korea is preparing to launch another satellite despite international opposition, the country's official media reported Friday. North Korea fired a rocket Aug. 31 that flew over Japan and landed in the Pacific Ocean. It said the rocket launched a satellite. Japan has dismissed that claim, saying it was a ballistic missile.
NEWS
September 15, 1998 | From Associated Press
Backing away from its initial assessment, the State Department said Monday that the object launched by North Korea in the western Pacific two weeks ago was a satellite and not a missile. But, it said, the military implications could be ominous for North Korea's neighbors either way. "We have concluded that North Korea did attempt to orbit a very small satellite. We also have concluded the satellite failed to achieve orbit," State Department spokesman James P. Rubin said.
NEWS
September 15, 1998 | From Associated Press
Backing away from its initial assessment, the State Department said Monday that the object launched by North Korea in the western Pacific two weeks ago was a satellite and not a missile. But, it said, the military implications could be ominous for North Korea's neighbors either way. "We have concluded that North Korea did attempt to orbit a very small satellite. We also have concluded the satellite failed to achieve orbit," State Department spokesman James P. Rubin said.
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