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NEWS
June 2, 1998 | Associated Press
The troublesome motion-control system aboard the Russian space station Mir was working again Monday, one day before the planned launch of the U.S. shuttle Discovery on NASA's last mission to the space outpost, officials said. The Russian space outpost had been adrift in orbit since its motion-control system shut down Saturday, threatening to delay the launch of Discovery. NASA's strict flight rules forbid a shuttle to dock if Mir is not under full control.
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NEWS
May 3, 2001 | From Associated Press
History's first paid space tourist got his trip to orbit in the "wrong way," and his Russian hosts may end up having to pay for it, the chief of NASA said Wednesday. NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin told a House subcommittee that Dennis Tito, 60, a Los Angeles multimillionaire who ignored the objections of NASA and paid Russia $20 million to fly him to the space station, has caused anxiety among space workers who oversee the mission's safety.
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NEWS
July 7, 1995 | Associated Press
Astronauts and cosmonauts conducted a final round of medical experiments Thursday while crew mates prepared the space shuttle Atlantis for its return from a historic U.S.-Russian docking mission. Atlantis, launched June 27 with five astronauts and a new two-cosmonaut crew for the Russian space station Mir, was scheduled to land at 7:55 a.m. PDT today at Florida's Kennedy Space Center with eight aboard, including astronaut Norman E.
NEWS
April 29, 2001 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a smile and a wave, Los Angeles multimillionaire Dennis Tito rocketed into the heavens Saturday in a flawless launch from the Baikonur cosmodrome that officially made him the world's first "space tourist." As the Soyuz rocket in which he was strapped spewed fire and began to climb slowly skyward, Tito calmly checked his watch and a sheet of launch instructions and occasionally waved again at the cockpit camera.
NEWS
September 5, 1997 | From Associated Press
Ground controllers and the Mir space station's former crew share responsibility for a June space collision, space officials said Thursday, contradicting an earlier verdict that blamed only the cosmonauts. Several space agencies were on the latest commission, and they spread the blame more widely than a panel that reported its conclusions Tuesday.
MAGAZINE
February 4, 2001 | Janet Wiscombe, Janet Wiscombe's last article for the magazine was a profile of Sally Ride
Gazing out on the grounds of his palatial hilltop estate, it doesn't take long for the gentleman in the gray silk suit to reveal his passion: "This is my own spaceship on Earth," he says. Here, in the rarefied atmosphere high above the Getty Museum in Pacific Palisades, Dennis Tito lives alone in one of L.A.'s poshest pads. He surrounds himself with the good things in life--a tennis court and pool, European antiques, tapestries and chandeliers. He parks his Ferrari in an eight-car garage.
NEWS
July 6, 1997 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As an unmanned cargo capsule hurtled toward the crippled Mir space station with repair tools Saturday, U.S. astronaut Michael Foale and his two Russian colleagues readied for a perilous mission that could make or break Russia's manned space program. The Progress craft ferrying vital supplies and life-support equipment is expected to dock with Mir early Monday.
NEWS
November 23, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Russian "friendship rocket" carrying religious icons and a toy stuffed dog splashed down off Washington state's coast. Space Flight Europe-America 500 commemorated the International Year of Space and the 500th anniversary of Columbus' arrival in the Western Hemisphere. A Soyuz rocket carrying the capsule was launched a week ago from the once-secret Plesetsk space center near the northern Russian port of Archangel.
NEWS
June 2, 1999 | Associated Press
In the strongest sign yet that Russia's era of space glory may be ending, the Russian Space Agency plans to have cosmonauts abandon the Mir space station in August and then to let it eventually burn up in the atmosphere unless new funding is found, officials said Tuesday. The decision must still be approved by President Boris N. Yeltsin. The 13-year-old Mir saw a series of accidents in 1997, including a fire and a near-fatal space collision.
NEWS
February 2, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The crew of the Russian Mir space station is to stage what it hopes will be a spectacular experiment Thursday using a huge mirror to reflect a beam of sunlight over Earth. The experiment envisages unfolding a space mirror made of a membrane covered by a metal layer. In theory, the mirror is to work like the moon, reflecting sunlight onto Europe and North America, spokesman Valery Lyndin said. In a clear sky, the space mirror should resemble a shooting star, Lyndin said.
NEWS
April 18, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
European and Canadian space officials joined NASA in objecting to Russia's plan to put a U.S. millionaire tourist aboard the international space station this month. The Russians plan to launch California tycoon Dennis Tito and two cosmonauts aboard a Soyuz rocket April 28. The Soyuz will arrive at the space station two days later, and Tito will spend a week aboard.
NEWS
April 12, 2001 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dennis Tito's countdown has begun. Russian space officials, defying complaints from NASA, on Wednesday formally approved the 60-year-old Los Angeles millionaire to serve as the third member of Moscow's next mission to the International Space Station. They set the launch date for April 28. Tito will fork over about $20 million for the flight, making him the world's first American "space tourist." But he considers himself a space pioneer in his own right.
NEWS
March 23, 2001 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a nail-biting operation, Russia's spaceflight controllers pushed the Mir space station into its final fiery descent Thursday night Pacific time, making it the largest man-made object ever brought out of orbit. The controllers allowed themselves a moment of triumph as the station broke up over the target area in the South Pacific east of New Zealand. It had completed 86,331 orbits.
NEWS
March 21, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dennis Tito will fly aboard the International Space Station next month, Russian officials insisted Tuesday, even though the United States and 14 other countries are arguing that the Los Angeles multimillionaire should wait. Tito, a former rocket scientist turned money manager, is believed to be paying the Russians about $20 million to become the world's first space tourist and has been training alongside cosmonauts outside Moscow for the last eight months.
NEWS
March 20, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Russian space officials said the Mir space station will be dumped Friday, one day later than planned, and the parliament chairman made an appeal for President Vladimir V. Putin to grant the aging station a reprieve. Space officials had previously set Mir's controlled descent into the South Pacific for early Thursday but said it would be postponed because the station's orbit was dropping more slowly than expected. Meanwhile, Gennady N.
NEWS
March 17, 2001 | PETER PAE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From his modest El Segundo office decorated with burnt and twisted metal, William Ailor has led a quiet and somewhat obscure career tracking trash floating in space. But in the last few weeks, Ailor's telephone has been ringing off the hook, as government officials and reporters from as far as Japan and England have clamored for his expertise on the return to Earth of the Russian space station Mir.
NEWS
February 21, 1999 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was a time when Konstantin Feoktistov didn't ask why. The cosmos was out there waiting, and he knew how to get there. But now, the 73-year-old engineer and former cosmonaut, who was the brains and the force behind Russia's Mir space station, is troubled. He's no longer quite sure what the point was. "We got what we planned from the Mir," he said. "But we never got all we hoped."
NEWS
July 15, 1999 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kazakhstan lifted a ban Wednesday on launches from Russia's main space center, ending a standoff between the former Soviet republics that threatened to force the crew of the Mir space station to abandon ship early. Russia had warned that unless a Progress cargo ship was permitted to blast off from the facility in Kazakhstan by the end of the week, Mir would run out of food and water and the three-man crew would be forced to return to Earth.
NEWS
March 11, 2001 | From Associated Press
The space shuttle Discovery's astronauts arrived at the international space station late Friday and, after handshakes, bearhugs and somersaults, quickly began the crucial exchange of crews. The two Russian Yuris were the first to swap places. Yuri Usachev moved into space station Alpha, and station resident Yuri Gidzenko took the vacated spot aboard Discovery. Americans Jim Voss and Susan Helms had to go out on a spacewalk before joining Usachev over on the station for a four-month stay.
MAGAZINE
February 4, 2001 | Janet Wiscombe, Janet Wiscombe's last article for the magazine was a profile of Sally Ride
Gazing out on the grounds of his palatial hilltop estate, it doesn't take long for the gentleman in the gray silk suit to reveal his passion: "This is my own spaceship on Earth," he says. Here, in the rarefied atmosphere high above the Getty Museum in Pacific Palisades, Dennis Tito lives alone in one of L.A.'s poshest pads. He surrounds himself with the good things in life--a tennis court and pool, European antiques, tapestries and chandeliers. He parks his Ferrari in an eight-car garage.
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