Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSpace Programs United States
IN THE NEWS

Space Programs United States

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 1, 1999 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
NASA lost its $125-million Mars Climate Orbiter because spacecraft engineers failed to convert from English to metric measurements when exchanging vital data before the craft was launched, space agency officials said Thursday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 4, 2002 | From Associated Press
Two shuttle astronauts ventured out into open space early Monday to install a new, stronger solar wing on the Hubble Space Telescope. John Grunsfeld and Richard Linnehan emerged from space shuttle Columbia high above Africa, in the first of five excursions planned this week to enhance Hubble. "Oh, wow, beautiful view," Grunsfeld said. "It's time to go outside and turn some wrenches," Mission Control told the astronauts following their successful capture of the telescope.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 27, 1993 | From Associated Press
NASA unfurled 1,640 feet of copper wire high above Earth on Saturday and conducted electricity through the line in a low-cost space tether test. "I rate this as a full success," National Aeronautics and Space Administration physicist Jim McCoy said. "We're getting at least a third of an amp in both directions." Such tethers, once refined, could be used to dispel electrical charges from spacecraft, including a space station, and change spacecraft orbits.
NEWS
March 2, 2002 | From Associated Press
The space shuttle Columbia blasted into orbit for the first time in more than two years Friday, and a cooling system problem immediately raised concerns the mission to the Hubble Space Telescope might have to be shortened. Shuttle program manager Ron Dittemore said he was optimistic that the 11-day mission was on track but said engineers would spend the next 24 hours analyzing the problem in one of two critical coolant loops for the payload bay doors.
BUSINESS
October 10, 1999 | SUSAN VAUGHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Today, as the spacecraft Galileo swoops past Jupiter's volcano-ridden moon Io collecting images and scientific data, few will be as mesmerized by the close encounter as La Verne resident Eileen Clark. The 49-year-old space buff is a mission operations analyst at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena. She trouble-shoots the Galileo project, anticipating problems before they occur. Clark loves her job. In fact, she'd be thrilled to remain at JPL for years to come.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1991 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Getting a student-designed science experiment into space is almost as difficult as making a perfect metal sphere. But later this month, four former Cal State Northridge students hope to accomplish both. After almost seven years of false starts and bureaucratic delays, their experimental device for making a flawless ball bearing in space has been loaded aboard the space shuttle Columbia, which is scheduled to lift off from Cape Canaveral Wednesday morning.
NEWS
August 21, 1989 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
Scientists have discovered a "Rogue's Gallery" of storm centers in the atmosphere of Neptune, including hurricane-like storms that are so intense they defy explanation. Packing winds of up to 400 m.p.h., the fierce storms appear as dark spots on photos that are being sent back to Earth from the Voyager spacecraft, which is zipping toward a close encounter with the distant planet Thursday night.
NEWS
December 6, 1999 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
It's a scene that plays over and over in his mind: On the final leg of a mission to Mars, the spacecraft disappears with his experiments on board. It's no fantasy. In fact, three times UCLA planetary scientist David Paige has lost years of work and millions of dollars in equipment on three separate missions to Mars over the last decade. Throughout the weekend, the question lingered: Is he about to relive his worst nightmare?
NEWS
July 5, 1997 | K.C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
In a spectacular success for NASA's return to Mars after a 21-year absence, the Pathfinder spacecraft bounced safely off the rocky surface of the Red Planet at just after 10 a.m. on the Fourth of July and coasted to a halt right on target and--more astonishingly--right-side up.
NEWS
July 29, 1988
Fueling of the shuttle Discovery in a twice-delayed countdown test was interrupted by a small leak in an 8-inch liquid hydrogen rocket fuel line at the launch pad, officials said. If the leak persisted, they planned to pressurize the line in a bid to reseat a suspect seal. The three-hour procedure to fill the giant external tank with supercold liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen fuel served as a rehearsal for a crucial main engine test firing Monday.
NEWS
December 4, 2001 | From Associated Press
Two spacewalking cosmonauts removed an old rubber seal stuck to the international space station, clearing the way for space shuttle Endeavour to lift off today on a flight to the orbiting outpost. Launch is set for just after sunset amid unprecedented security to guard against terrorist attacks. Endeavour will deliver a new crew of three to the space station.
NEWS
November 27, 2001 | Reuters
NASA started its three-day clock ticking Monday toward the launch of the space shuttle Endeavour with tight security at the Florida spaceport for the first shuttle launch since the Sept. 11 attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. Endeavour will launch Thursday to deliver to the international space station a new three-member crew of Russian cosmonauts and U.S. astronauts and will return with the crew now living there.
NEWS
July 17, 2001 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Astronauts had to contend with water and air leaks and alarms while outfitting a passageway for spacewalkers on the international space station. Water spilled from a cooling line, and the crews of space shuttle Atlantis and space station Alpha had to mop up the mess. Then an alarm went off in the station's laboratory. A computer sensed a drop in water pressure and shut off the cooling system. An air leak cropped up about 10 hours later.
NEWS
July 12, 2001 | STEPHANI SUTHERLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to catch a cosmic breeze, NASA is preparing to launch a new spacecraft to seek evidence of the earliest days of our solar system 4 1/2 billion years ago. The satellite, to be known as Genesis, is scheduled to launch July 30. Its mission is scheduled to end in 2004 with a dramatic helicopter recovery over the Utah desert.
NEWS
May 3, 2001 | From Associated Press
History's first paid space tourist got his trip to orbit in the "wrong way," and his Russian hosts may end up having to pay for it, the chief of NASA said Wednesday. NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin told a House subcommittee that Dennis Tito, 60, a Los Angeles multimillionaire who ignored the objections of NASA and paid Russia $20 million to fly him to the space station, has caused anxiety among space workers who oversee the mission's safety.
NEWS
April 30, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
NASA scientists said they have contacted the Pioneer 10 spacecraft, ending fears that the robotic probe had gone silent 29 years into a mission that has carried it more than 7 billion miles from Earth. A radio antenna outside Madrid received a signal Saturday from Pioneer 10, marking the first time the spacecraft had been heard from since Aug. 19. Pioneer was launched March 2, 1972.
NEWS
May 29, 1991 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In its first detailed explanation of the April explosion of a prototype Titan 4 rocket motor at Edwards Air Force Base, the Air Force on Tuesday said the spectacular blast appears to have been caused by wayward combustion gases that partially blocked the solid fuel's hollow core, through which the fiery thrust jet passes. But Air Force officials said the problem should be relatively easy to fix. "We consider this a defect in the design," not in the manufacturing process, said Capt.
NEWS
July 12, 2001 | STEPHANI SUTHERLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to catch a cosmic breeze, NASA is preparing to launch a new spacecraft to seek evidence of the earliest days of our solar system 4 1/2 billion years ago. The satellite, to be known as Genesis, is scheduled to launch July 30. Its mission is scheduled to end in 2004 with a dramatic helicopter recovery over the Utah desert.
NEWS
April 20, 2001 | From Associated Press
Space shuttle Endeavour roared into orbit Thursday, carrying a giant robotic arm that is needed to finish building the international space station. The midafternoon launch went off without a hitch. Among the 20,000-plus guests watching the launch: four world leaders, dignitaries from several countries and even a celebrity couple, Warren Beatty and Annette Bening.
NEWS
April 17, 2001 | From Associated Press
The countdown began Monday for the launch of space shuttle Endeavour on a critical space station mission involving high-tech robotics. Endeavour is scheduled to lift off Thursday afternoon, carrying a 57-foot, 9-inch robotic arm for the international space station that will be used as a construction crane. The seven astronauts arrived at Kennedy Space Center several hours before the countdown clocks began ticking.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|