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Space Programs United States

NEWS
April 8, 2001 | USHA LEE McFARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the throngs peering skyward from the NASA causeway, it was a spectacular daytime launch. For geochemist William Boynton, it was the beginning of a promising science mission. But for Scott Hubbard, who oversees NASA's troubled Mars program, the flawless launch of the 2001 Mars Odyssey orbiter was much more: It was a redemption. "We are back in business," said Hubbard, who has been presiding over the massive restructuring of the Mars program since the loss of two spacecraft in 1999.
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NEWS
April 7, 2001 | USHA LEE McFARLING, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Technicians have checked and double-checked each seal and solder. Engineers have reviewed countless lines of software code and every last metric conversion. Panels of experts have spent months trying to dream up--and then quash--any possible scenario for failure. Now, after a mind-numbing rundown of checks and reviews, the 2001 Odyssey spacecraft is perched atop a Boeing Delta II rocket on Launch Pad 17, ready for its six-month trip to Mars. The launch is scheduled for 11:02 a.m. EDT today.
NEWS
March 21, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Space shuttle Discovery returned to Earth, bringing the first crew of the international space station back from a 4 1/2-month mission spent building and fixing the orbiting outpost. Discovery landed at Cape Canaveral at 2:31 a.m. EST, almost two weeks after blasting off to retrieve the three space station pioneers. The space station voyagers circled Earth about 2,200 times during their trailblazing expedition and covered 58 million miles.
NEWS
March 20, 2001 | From Times wire services
The space shuttle Discovery headed back to Cape Canaveral, ferrying the first three astronauts to live aboard space station Alpha. They face an arduous return to gravity after 141 days in space. Landing is set for just before 1 p.m. on Wednesday at Kennedy Space Center. "It's like being stuck to a big magnet," NASA flight surgeon Dr. Terry Taddeo said in describing the effect of gravity after months of floating weightless in space.
NEWS
March 15, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
NASA decided to move the international space station to dodge a piece of orbiting debris lost by a spacewalking astronaut on Sunday. The shoebox-sized space junk, part of a foot-restraint system, and the space station, which is docked to the space shuttle Discovery, were both orbiting at speeds of about 5 miles per second. NASA said a collision was unlikely but decided to move up by several hours a scheduled maneuver to boost the station's orbit using the shuttle's rocket engines.
NEWS
March 12, 2001 | Associated Press
In what's being billed as NASA's longest spacewalk, two astronauts rearranged the international space station on Sunday to make room for an Italian cargo carrier. The module, called Leonardo, was raised from space shuttle Discovery's payload bay late Sunday night, hours after the spacewalk. It was slowly hoisted by the robot arm toward the space station.
NEWS
March 11, 2001 | From Associated Press
The space shuttle Discovery's astronauts arrived at the international space station late Friday and, after handshakes, bearhugs and somersaults, quickly began the crucial exchange of crews. The two Russian Yuris were the first to swap places. Yuri Usachev moved into space station Alpha, and station resident Yuri Gidzenko took the vacated spot aboard Discovery. Americans Jim Voss and Susan Helms had to go out on a spacewalk before joining Usachev over on the station for a four-month stay.
NEWS
March 9, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Space shuttle Discovery soared into space, carrying a new crew to the international space station to relieve the three men who have been toiling in orbit for the last four months. The shuttle will catch up with the space station early Saturday, and the fresh crew and the weary one will immediately begin trading places. It was a smooth countdown at the Kennedy Space Center and a flawless climb to orbit.
NEWS
March 7, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. space shuttle Discovery was due to lift off on a mission to take a new crew, a new module and tons of equipment to the international space station. The launching for the latest mission to the giant construction site is scheduled for 6:42 a.m. EST Thursday, two minutes after dawn at the Kennedy Space Center on Florida's Atlantic coast. The 12-day mission features three crews, three commanders and the space station's first temporary module, built in Italy and named for Leonardo da Vinci.
NEWS
March 3, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
After a mission that exceeded expectations, the hardy spacecraft that became the first man-made object to land on an asteroid was shut down this week by NASA scientists at JPL and Johns Hopkins University. On Feb. 12, the 1,100-pound NEAR spacecraft gently landed on the asteroid Eros and continued to send signals to surprised and delighted scientists. NASA extended communications with the NEAR mission by two weeks beyond its scheduled Feb.
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