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October 23, 1987 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
A nuclear-powered Soviet spy satellite that fell to Earth in 1983 apparently burned up in the upper atmosphere, releasing at least 80% of the 110 pounds of radioactive uranium in its reactor, U.S. scientists said in a report published today. That radioactivity has dispersed throughout the upper atmosphere, increasing the amount of the most radioactive form of uranium there by 50%, Department of Energy researchers said in the new issue of Science magazine.
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NEWS
July 21, 1999 | From Reuters
The men of Apollo 11, celebrating the 30th anniversary of man's first landing on the moon, credited the competition of a space race with the Soviet Union for the success of America's lunar program. Neil Armstrong, the Apollo 11 commander and the first man to walk on the moon, Edwin E. "Buzz" Aldrin Jr.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1987 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
Midway through an 84-day Skylab mission in 1974, the three resident astronauts shocked ground controllers by deciding to take a Sunday off from scheduled work. Their unexpected rebellion led to what crew leader Gerald Carr called "the first space sensitivity session" with ground controllers. In December, 1982, Soviet cosmonauts Anatoli Berezevoi and Valentin Lebedev risked a hazardous night landing during a snowstorm rather than extend their 211-day mission another week.
NEWS
March 26, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wouldn't it be a pity if Cape Canaveral suddenly belonged to another country? That is just the sort of fix that Russia's space sector has found itself in since the Soviet Union's collapse in late 1991. When the former republic of Kazakhstan gained independence, it proceeded to announce that Baikonur, the main Soviet launch center that happened to be situated on its windy steppes, had become Kazakh property. Russia inherited the Soviet Union's ambitions in space, but not its main launch pads.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1988 | JOSEPH TREEN, Joseph Treen is a free-lance writer in New York City and
Sometime in the next few weeks, a disabled Soviet spy satellite carrying a highly charged nuclear reactor will drop out of its shallow orbit. If it burns up in the upper atmosphere--as Moscow predicts--it will go largely unnoticed by the general public, just another of the hundreds of pieces of space junk that fall from the sky every year. But if the satellite follows the predictions of some American space experts, it will plunge to Earth, scattering radioactive debris wherever it lands. The 4.
NEWS
May 19, 1990 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The Soyuz spacecraft that took two Soviet cosmonauts to the space station Mir last February was damaged slightly during takeoff and is scheduled to be repaired before the cosmonauts can return to Earth, U.S. experts said Friday. The experts stressed that the damage does not appear to threaten the cosmonauts or their mission.
NEWS
October 1, 1987 | Associated Press
A cosmonaut set an endurance record in space Wednesday, breaking the previous record of 237 days in orbit, Soviet media said. "It's only the beginning," flight commander Yuri Romanenko declared on a telecast from the orbiting Mir space station. Romanenko, 42, blasted into space on Feb. 6 along with flight engineer Alexander Laveikin and began a series of experiments aboard the Mir, the Soviets' second-generation space station launched 19 months ago.
NEWS
April 10, 1991 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
It's a small world. As the space shuttle Atlantis prepared for a scheduled landing this morning at Edwards Air Force Base in Southern California, it passed close enough to the Soviet space station Mir for astronauts and cosmonauts to see each other's spacecraft. The close encounters Tuesday were virtually near misses on the space scale, although there was never any danger that the two would collide.
NEWS
February 6, 1990 | Associated Press
Soviet cosmonauts left the Mir orbital station on Monday for a second test of a space "motorcycle" designed to rescue space crews in distress and repair satellites. Cosmonauts Alexander Viktorenko and Alexander Serebrov, who have been aboard the Mir complex for nearly five months, tested the device, officially known as the Cosmonaut Movement System, the official news agency Tass said.
NEWS
December 18, 1990 | From Associated Press
A company is betting Americans so dearly want to fly in space that they will pay to enter a sweepstakes for a chance to win a trip aboard a Soviet rocket and a week on the space station Mir. "Our long-term business strategy is to arrange for space travel opportunities for anyone who wishes to go into space," James Davidson of Space Travel Services said Monday. Would-be American cosmonauts can call 1-900-258-2MIR--at a cost of $2.99 per call--to enter a random drawing.
NEWS
December 11, 1993 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Among the fading spacesuits, three-ton capsules and other Soviet space program artifacts to be sold to the highest bidder here today is a pair of dirty and mangled gloves valued at $1,500 to $2,000. The gloves were worn by cosmonaut Vasily G. Lazarev when a malfunctioning booster rocket aborted his April, 1975, mission, marooning him on a mountainside near China, where he managed to survive until he could be rescued.
NEWS
March 21, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High above Earth, the Rip van Winkle of the Space Age said Friday he's greatly looking forward to coming home next week. And like Rip, he said it could take time for him to wake up to a new world. Speaking from orbit, former Soviet cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev told reporters that he is in "high spirits" and laughed at rumors that he has fits of depression.
NEWS
March 20, 1992 | Reuters
Entrepreneurs in the former Soviet Union have figured out a way to cash in on the country's space program--selling used spacecraft. Cold War buffs and space enthusiasts can bid for the re-entry module of an authentic Soviet spacecraft at a Paris auction April 23. "This is the first ever public sale of a piece of space equipment," said auctioneer Herve Poulain. Only the very rich need apply, however. Bidding starts at $70,000.
NEWS
March 18, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid serious doubts over the future of what was the lavishly funded Soviet space program, Russia launched the first cosmonauts of its own on Tuesday and prepared for the return of a 33-year-old engineer parked in orbit since the Soviet Union's collapse. At 3:53 p.m. local time (2:53 a.m. PST), the Soyuz rocket carrying Cmdr. Alexander S. Viktorenko, flight engineer Alexander Y. Kaleri and a paying German guest--Maj.
NEWS
December 31, 1991
In a span of about 10 years, beginning in the late 1920s, the former Russian Empire transformed itself from a backward agrarian nation to a major modern industrial power--and thus became better prepared for the Second World War. Some examples of how Soviet scientists left their mark: SCIENCE: Party ideology had devastating effects on the scientific community. Foreign scientific concepts such as Einstein's theory of relativity and quantum mechanics were labeled "bourgeois."
NEWS
December 22, 1991 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The haunting "beep-beep" emitted by a basketball-sized aluminum sphere circling the Earth in the winter of 1957 told a startled America that Sputnik had been launched into orbit and that the Soviets were far more advanced technologically than most had thought. Sputnik and other early Soviet space triumphs rallied a nation to action, and before it would end, Americans--not Soviets--would walk on the surface of the moon.
NEWS
December 29, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Soviet spacecraft is tumbling out of control and will re-enter the Earth's atmosphere within a few weeks. But it should burn up and pose little threat to anyone on the ground, the Soviet Glavkosmos space agency said. It said the Salyut 7 space station is likely to re-enter in late January or early February, but its trajectory is impossible to predict. Salyut 7, precursor of the current Mir space station, was launched in 1982.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1990 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Fifteen years to the day after five men orbited the globe in a mechanical embrace in the only joint, manned space venture by the United States and the Soviet Union, four veterans of the historic encounter met in Los Angeles to celebrate the past and ponder the future. All these years later, they are still preaching the same gospel of international cooperation that they have been pushing since an American Apollo spacecraft docked with a Soviet Soyuz far above the Earth.
NEWS
October 3, 1991 | Associated Press
A rocket carrying the first Austrian into space blasted off from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in the southern Soviet desert early Wednesday, en route to the orbiting Mir space station. The launch, attended by Austrian Chancellor Franz Vranitzky and Soviet officials, took place on schedule, Tass reported. The news agency said the rocket functioned properly and that the three crew members were "feeling well."
NEWS
September 13, 1991 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
An ingenious "Mars rover" that Soviet scientists plan to send to Mars in 1996 is ready for testing next spring in California's Mojave Desert, according to a team of Southern California space experts who got more than they bargained for when they went to the Soviet Union's super-secret Kamchatka Peninsula recently to observe the rover.
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