Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSpace Race
IN THE NEWS

Space Race

FEATURED ARTICLES
WORLD
February 1, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
South Korea's successful satellite launch this week served as the latest act of one-upmanship in an accelerating space race gripping Northeast Asia. Membership in the elite global space club is being pursued by wealthy countries that can afford it as well as economic basket cases that cannot, a quest for political stature driven more by emotion and nationalism than economic promise. What nations get out of creating their own space programs is a heady cocktail of national pride, technological muscle-flexing and the power to project military menace as a reminder to neighbors that they won't back down from the region's mounting territorial disputes.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
December 26, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
China watched this month as the nation's first lunar rover rolled across the moon's surface. It was a moment of national pride when images of the six-wheel rover, dubbed Jade Rabbit, were transmitted live back to Earth, showing the red and gold Chinese flag on the moon for the first time. "Now as Jade Rabbit has made its touchdown on the moon surface," the state-run Xinhua news agency said, "the whole world again marvels at China's remarkable space capabilities. " The lunar triumph offered many Americans their first glimpse at an unfolding new space race involving countries with emerging economies.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1986
On June 17 The Times reported that Jane's 1986 Spaceflight Directory now views the Soviets as having an "almost frightening" 10-year lead over the United States in the practical utilization of space. It is good to see that someone recognizes that the Soviet tortoise is so far ahead of the American hare. It should also be seen that the United States is not so far behind just because of the Challenger accident; the Soviet Union has been plodding along ever since the Apollo era and can now reap the benefits.
WORLD
December 14, 2013 | By Barbara Demick, This article has been corrected. See the note at the bottom for details.
BEIJING - Chinese state media early Sunday began transmitting images and video taken by its moon rover, a gold-hued unmanned exploration vehicle named the Jade Rabbit after the story of a mythological Chinese moon goddess who kept a pet rabbit. The images were sparking excitement among space enthusiasts. "It is just beautiful to see the surface of the moon up close in a way we haven't in years. The images we remember of the moon were taken decades ago. These are the first photographs of the Internet age," said Morris Jones, an Australian space analyst based in Sydney.
NEWS
October 4, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
It had to happen: "Voice" and "Survivor" producer Mark Burnett is teaming up with Richard Branson for the ultimate unscripted TV show in which average Americans compete for a chance to go into outer space. NBC on Thursday announced an exclusive deal with the pair for "Space Race," a show it's hyping as a "groundbreaking, elimination competition series. " Winners score a ride on Branson's Virgin Galactic's SpaceShipTwo, which made successful test flights this year in its quest to take commercial passengers into space.
NEWS
May 31, 2012 | By Dan Turner
Elon Musk, the billionaire founder of Hawthorne-based Space Exploration Technologies Corp., has been compared to Tony Stark, Marvel Comics' billionaire inventor who dons a high-tech suit of armor to become Iron Man (Musk actually had a cameo in "Iron Man 2," and the SpaceX factory was used as a set for the film). But there's a far less super-powered and slightly less sane figure from real life that he resembles more: Howard Hughes. Hughes, a visionary who helped build Southern California's aerospace industry from scratch, was a pioneer in an era when entrepreneurs were figuring out how to make air travel, heretofore the province of military air forces, hobbyists and Lindbergh-like daredevils, commercially viable.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2009
"Mae Jemison: Space Scientist" Gail Sakurai Mae Jemison is African American. She wants to be an astronaut, but she has to struggle to overcome others' limited imaginations. Was she the first African American woman to try to go into space? Does she succeed? I encourage you to read this book. Reviewed by Ryan, 10 Lincoln Elementary, Glendale -- "Dogzilla" Dav Pilkey Once there was a town named Mousopolis. The first annual barbecue cook-off was there.
BUSINESS
May 5, 1989
The space race appears to be heating up for industrial and high-technology companies in Orange County. First-quarter absorption of industrial space in the county totaled 4.1 million square feet, 20% higher than 1988's average quarterly absorption of 3.4 million square feet, according to Coldwell Banker. Of the total space absorbed, 64% was leased and the remainder was sold. Absorption represents the net increase in space leased or sold. Irvine led county cities with almost 1 million square feet absorbed, and Anaheim was second with 840,083.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2013 | By Gale Holland, Los Angeles Times
Gerald Blackburn walked out of his office and surveyed the ruins of what was once the nerve center of America's space race. The vast debris field with giant cranes nosing through heaps of broken concrete and metal sheeting had been home to the Downey Industrial Site, a 160-acre campus southeast of Los Angeles where engineers like Blackburn designed the spacecraft that put Americans on the moon. The largely abandoned buildings were leveled over the holidays to make way for a big-box retail center.
NEWS
August 23, 2001 | From Associated Press
President Kennedy went toe-to-toe with the chief of NASA to try to convince him that beating the Russians to the moon should be the agency's priority, newly released White House tapes showed Wednesday. Kennedy and NASA Administrator James Webb had a long and sometimes abrupt exchange in a November 1962 meeting in which Kennedy stressed the Cold War political importance of winning the space race.
OPINION
December 9, 2013 | By Louis Friedman
Some 10 years ago, during testimony before Congress, I was asked by Sen. Sam Brownback (R-Kan.), "Do you think we are in a space race with China?" I quickly answered "no" and proceeded to explain that, in my view, the concept of a space race represented old thinking. The modern way forward in space would be through international cooperation and coordination. Today, I think my insistence that the space race was over was naive. There are now many space races. One is taking place between China and India, dramatized by India's launch of a Mars orbiter last month and China's launch this month of a lunar lander and rover.
NEWS
October 4, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
It had to happen: "Voice" and "Survivor" producer Mark Burnett is teaming up with Richard Branson for the ultimate unscripted TV show in which average Americans compete for a chance to go into outer space. NBC on Thursday announced an exclusive deal with the pair for "Space Race," a show it's hyping as a "groundbreaking, elimination competition series. " Winners score a ride on Branson's Virgin Galactic's SpaceShipTwo, which made successful test flights this year in its quest to take commercial passengers into space.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2013 | By Scott Collins
NBC is hoping to get a space-travel reality show off the ground this time.  The network is teaming up with producer Mark Burnett and billionaire Richard Branson to make "Space Race," a competition series that would send the winner up in SpaceShipTwo, a commercial space-travel service from Branson's Virgin Galactic. The series could offer Virgin a key opportunity to plug its services.  FULL COVERAGE: Fall TV preview 2013 "Virgin Galactic's mission is to democratize space, eventually making commercial space travel affordable and accessible to all," Branson wrote in a statement.
WORLD
February 1, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
South Korea's successful satellite launch this week served as the latest act of one-upmanship in an accelerating space race gripping Northeast Asia. Membership in the elite global space club is being pursued by wealthy countries that can afford it as well as economic basket cases that cannot, a quest for political stature driven more by emotion and nationalism than economic promise. What nations get out of creating their own space programs is a heady cocktail of national pride, technological muscle-flexing and the power to project military menace as a reminder to neighbors that they won't back down from the region's mounting territorial disputes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2013 | By Gale Holland, Los Angeles Times
Gerald Blackburn walked out of his office and surveyed the ruins of what was once the nerve center of America's space race. The vast debris field with giant cranes nosing through heaps of broken concrete and metal sheeting had been home to the Downey Industrial Site, a 160-acre campus southeast of Los Angeles where engineers like Blackburn designed the spacecraft that put Americans on the moon. The largely abandoned buildings were leveled over the holidays to make way for a big-box retail center.
NEWS
September 12, 2012 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
Fifty years ago today, President Kennedy made his case to the American people that the country should send a man to the moon. “We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things not because they are easy but because they are hard,” Kennedy told an outdoor audience at Rice University in Houston. The Sept. 12, 1962, speech came more than a year after the Soviets sent cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin into space, becoming the first human to orbit the Earth. His April 12, 1961, flight lasted less than two hours, but the space race was on. Three weeks later, NASA astronaut Alan Shepard became the first American to travel to space with a five-minute suborbital flight.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1987 | JOHN E. PIKE and GAIL H. HOFFMAN, John E. Pike is the associate director for space policy at the Federation of American Scientists in Washington. Gail H. Hoffman is a Washington-based media and political consultant
Is America in danger of becoming No. 2 in space as a result of the Challenger accident? 1986 was the worst year for the U.S. space program since the Soviets launched Sputnik in 1957. But determining who is winning the competition depends on what the competition is about. In the 1960s, in the race to the moon, we clearly were in competition with the Soviets, and we won. Since then the competition has been to see which country can utilize outer space to benefit its own economy here on Earth.
OPINION
December 9, 2013 | By Louis Friedman
Some 10 years ago, during testimony before Congress, I was asked by Sen. Sam Brownback (R-Kan.), "Do you think we are in a space race with China?" I quickly answered "no" and proceeded to explain that, in my view, the concept of a space race represented old thinking. The modern way forward in space would be through international cooperation and coordination. Today, I think my insistence that the space race was over was naive. There are now many space races. One is taking place between China and India, dramatized by India's launch of a Mars orbiter last month and China's launch this month of a lunar lander and rover.
NEWS
August 6, 2012 | By James Rainey
The landing of the Curiosity spacecraft on Mars created a moment of singular American triumph, the kind politicians seemingly love to own. But in a nation suffering high unemployment and economic trepidation, no one expected Sunday's emotionally charged landing on the Red Planet to recharge the muted national conversation about space exploration.   Mitt Romney, who is yet to outline a detailed program for space, did not comment about Curiosity. President Obama - whose program calls for doing more with less, including funding cuts for planetary missions - trumpeted the historic moment in a prepared statement.
NEWS
May 31, 2012 | By Dan Turner
Elon Musk, the billionaire founder of Hawthorne-based Space Exploration Technologies Corp., has been compared to Tony Stark, Marvel Comics' billionaire inventor who dons a high-tech suit of armor to become Iron Man (Musk actually had a cameo in "Iron Man 2," and the SpaceX factory was used as a set for the film). But there's a far less super-powered and slightly less sane figure from real life that he resembles more: Howard Hughes. Hughes, a visionary who helped build Southern California's aerospace industry from scratch, was a pioneer in an era when entrepreneurs were figuring out how to make air travel, heretofore the province of military air forces, hobbyists and Lindbergh-like daredevils, commercially viable.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|