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November 22, 1992 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saddam Hussein's most-prized weapon lay concealed on a mountaintop in northern Iraq, where it was not discovered until well after the Persian Gulf War. The 165-foot-long cannon, capable of firing projectiles armed with nuclear devices and lethal chemicals at targets more than 100 miles away, had been tested and was nearly operational. The cannon was one of several "super-guns" that Hussein planned to acquire as part of his ill-fated drive toward military dominance in the Persian Gulf.
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NEWS
November 22, 1992 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saddam Hussein's most-prized weapon lay concealed on a mountaintop in northern Iraq, where it was not discovered until well after the Persian Gulf War. The 165-foot-long cannon, capable of firing projectiles armed with nuclear devices and lethal chemicals at targets more than 100 miles away, had been tested and was nearly operational. The cannon was one of several "super-guns" that Hussein planned to acquire as part of his ill-fated drive toward military dominance in the Persian Gulf.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Vladimir Sergeevich Syromyatnikov, 73, the veteran Russian space scientist whose docking system linked the Soviet Soyuz and the U.S. Apollo space capsules in the 1970s, a system that is still in use, died of leukemia Sept. 19 in Moscow. Syromyatnikov worked for Energia Space Research Corp. in the space program since before Sputnik first orbited the Earth.
NEWS
October 27, 1992 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration approved export licenses for computers and software that helped design Iraq's notorious supergun and a ballistic missile capable of reaching Israel and other Middle East countries, according to documents and congressional investigators. The export license for the computers was granted in the fall of 1989 to a Maryland company controlled by artillery wizard Gerald Bull, who was assassinated six months later outside his apartment in Belgium.
NEWS
April 14, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
A British company said Friday that it previously delivered to Iraq 44 of the steel cylinders of the type that Britain seized this week on grounds that Iraq could use them to build a "super gun." The company said it had delivered the cylinders with government permission--and had made a video about it. It repeated that they were pipes to be used in a petrochemical project. Iraq has also denied that the cylinders are designed for weapons use.
NEWS
June 22, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is it a gun? Is it a missile launcher? Is it oil refinery piping? The case of the mysterious "Iraqi supergun" continues to intrigue arms experts and officials in several countries. It involves the reputed assembly from components from various nations of the world's longest-range cannon, constituting a possible nuclear or chemical threat to Israel and involving tips from intelligence agencies and the murder in Brussels of a leading artillery specialist.
NEWS
July 24, 1992 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ and MURRAY WAAS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In September of 1990, Customs Service agents padlocked the doors of an Iraqi front company in a Cleveland suburb and, in response to a presidential order, froze its $2 million in assets. Customs Commissioner Carol Hallett said the action against Matrix Churchill Corp. came after agents learned that Iraq, which had invaded Kuwait one month earlier, had bought the firm "for the specific purpose of illegally acquiring critical weapons technology."
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