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NEWS
June 6, 1988 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
After all the fretting about the demise of space science in the aftermath of the Challenger disaster, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration is gearing up for a series of science missions that will be "unparalleled" in the history of the space program.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 2012 | By Scott Gold, Los Angeles Times
WATERTON CANYON, Colo. - The concrete-floored room looks, at first glance, like little more than a garage. There is a red tool chest, its drawers labeled: "Hacksaws. " "Allen wrenches. " There are stepladders and vise grips. There is also, at one end of the room, a half-built spaceship, and everyone is wearing toe-to-fingertip protective suits. "Don't. Touch. Anything. " Bruce Jakosky says the words politely but tautly, like a protective father - which, effectively, he is. Jakosky is the principal investigator behind NASA's next mission to Mars, putting him in the vanguard of an arcane niche of science: planetary protection - the science of exploring space without messing it up. PHOTOS: Stunning images of Earth at night As NASA pursues the search for life in the solar system, the cleanliness of robotic explorers is crucial to avoid contaminating other worlds.
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NEWS
November 22, 1992
Caltech has received a gift of $100,000 from the Lewis A. Kingsley Foundation of Garden Grove to establish the Merle Kingsley Endowed Fund for Astrophysics and Space Science. The fund will provide discretionary support to faculty and students involved in the teaching, research, and study of issues at the forefront of astrophysics and space science. The fund is named for Merle Kingsley Elkus, who with her late husband, Lewis Kingsley, established the foundation in 1963.
NEWS
September 12, 2012 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
Fifty years ago today, President Kennedy made his case to the American people that the country should send a man to the moon. “We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things not because they are easy but because they are hard,” Kennedy told an outdoor audience at Rice University in Houston. The Sept. 12, 1962, speech came more than a year after the Soviets sent cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin into space, becoming the first human to orbit the Earth. His April 12, 1961, flight lasted less than two hours, but the space race was on. Three weeks later, NASA astronaut Alan Shepard became the first American to travel to space with a five-minute suborbital flight.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1988
One of the main rationales for the American space program is the contribution that it makes to science and our knowledge of the world and the universe. Yet space science, as this leg of space is called, is usually overshadowed by the much more glamorous (and dangerous, and expensive) manned space program. The space scientists--whose fields range from planetary exploration to earth sciences to fundamental physics, chemistry and life science--have reason to complain that they don't get no respect.
NEWS
October 1, 1996 | From Associated Press
It was only meant to be in space for three years, but the International Ultraviolet Explorer lasted nearly 19, producing brilliant scientific observations before dying ignominiously Monday of money starvation. With the push of a button, Dr. Yoji Kondo at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland ended one of the longest and most productive missions in the history of space science. That caused the hydrazine gas tank, which held steering propellant, to empty and the batteries to go dead.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Rudolf F. Hoelker, a space science pioneer and member of Wernher von Braun's German rocket team, died June 14 at a Massachusetts hospital. He was 91. Hoelker was born in Halle, Germany, and worked with Von Braun in Germany during World War II. After the war, he moved to Huntsville, Ala., with the rocket team and helped to build the U.S. aerospace program in the early days of the space race.
NEWS
June 13, 1987 | United Press International
In a major organizational shift, NASA announced guidelines Friday to ensure smooth development of commercial space activities with a heavy emphasis on potentially lucrative materials science. Deputy Administrator Dale D. Myers said the importance of the virtually gravity-free space environment to new technology development warranted special treatment within the agency.
NEWS
June 29, 1988 | RUDY ABRAMSON, Times Staff Writer
Concluding a massive study of the U.S. space science program, the National Research Council's Space Science Board on Tuesday called for establishment of a satellite network capable of constant observation of the entire Earth. At the same time, it recommended intensive planetary exploration, emphasizing Mars during the last years of the 20th Century and the first of the 21st but including unmanned landings on Mercury and Venus and probes into the atmosphere of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune.
SPORTS
April 20, 1989 | JOHN GEIS
Kira Jorgensen made it official Wednesday--she has decided to take UCLA's scholarship offer and run. The Rancho Buena Vista High senior had narrowed her choices to UCLA and Cal-Poly San Luis Obispo and over the weekend put together a list of pros and cons before finally settling on UCLA. "The team, coach (Bob Messina), social life and academics . . . more things just matched up with UCLA than with Cal Poly," Jorgensen said. Jorgensen has been turning heads with record-breaking races in cross-country and track since her freshman year.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2009 | Susan Salter Reynolds
The Last Supper A Summer in Italy Rachel Cusk Farrar, Straus & Giroux: 240 pp., $25 She is restless. It is a "kind of curse, like the curses in mythology that are forever sending people from their homes to seek what perhaps can never be found." Rachel Cusk, her husband and two children pick up and go from their home in England to spend a few months in Italy, in a rented villa near Arezzo and on the Amalfi coast.
OPINION
July 28, 2008
Re "Looking at Mars," editorial, July 23 Once again, I must disagree with your editorial on the future of spaceflight and your continued opposition to human exploration. Although robots have their uses in going places where it is currently impossible to send humans, human spaceflight has many advantages, such as the ability to explore on a hunch and the ability to conduct in-flight repairs. There is also the inherent desire to travel to new places and literally "go where no man has gone before."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 2004 | Gregory W. Griggs, Times Staff Writer
Backers of a long-awaited plan to build a children's science museum in Thousand Oaks have received an encouraging proposal to locate the $30-million museum at The Oaks mall, a move that could improve fundraising.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Rudolf F. Hoelker, a space science pioneer and member of Wernher von Braun's German rocket team, died June 14 at a Massachusetts hospital. He was 91. Hoelker was born in Halle, Germany, and worked with Von Braun in Germany during World War II. After the war, he moved to Huntsville, Ala., with the rocket team and helped to build the U.S. aerospace program in the early days of the space race.
NATIONAL
February 5, 2003 | Rosie Mestel and Usha Lee McFarling, Times Staff Writers
Is it worth it? Over the last four decades, more than 400 humans have been hurled into space. The push has cost hundreds of billions of dollars and 21 lives. The effort at various times has been driven by national pride, Cold War competition and, at its most basic, a deep sense of wonder about what lies beyond our earthly horizons.
TRAVEL
November 5, 2000 | K.C. COLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As someone who's been hanging out at Bay Area science centers for 25 years, I was looking forward to meeting the new kid on the block: the Chabot Space & Science Center, which reopened in August in the Oakland hills in an elaborate new $76-million complex. Advance word seemed promising. Chabot is a working observatory. It has a state-of-the-art planetarium and three telescopes open Friday and Saturday evenings for public viewing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1990
Kevin Sweeney's column ("A Voyage That Might Anger, Not Inspire," Commentary, May 25) about human exploration of Mars raises some good questions, but also misses the point. President Bush's visionary call for the human exploration of Mars as the goal of the American space program is welcomed by those of us who have for years advocated such a goal. But it is also deficient in that President Bush has not provided the political rationale or explained the purpose of such a mission. Sweeney's objections are based on his perception that this is merely a repeat of President Kennedy's call in 1961 to put Americans on the Moon in response to Sputnik and the flight of Yuri Gagarin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1986
Since the smashing of the atom, more than 40 years ago, and since the advent of space exploration, 30 years ago, this planet has had nothing but grief! Wasn't "cheap nuclear power" supposed to be the great benefit of the splitting of the atom. I remember, back in the '40s when all the popular "science" magazines were telling us that an ocean liner could generate enough power to go around the world from the atomic energy derived from the atoms in a single glass of water. Bunk! Does anybody today have a lower utility bill, even discounting the effects of inflation over the past 40 years?
NEWS
November 2, 2000 | USHA LEE McFARLING, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
They'll probably get along, the two seasoned cosmonauts and the American commander scheduled to dock with the International Space Station early this morning. After all, project delays have given the crew nearly five years to chip away at the linguistic and cultural obstacles that could derail their extended mission. But will other U.S./Russian crews do as well? And what of future polyglot crews that contain, for example, Japanese and Brazilian astronauts?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2000 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before they were led to the Columbia orbiter, the 20 teachers had to remove or tape down their earrings, rings, bracelets and watches. They were entering a "foreign object debris" controlled area, where even a small piece of jewelry could damage the Columbia's highly sensitive, heat-resistant tiles, which can withstand 2,600 degrees. Small undetected objects could float in the spaceship when it travels at zero gravity, said Jim Morris, an industrial engineer at the Boeing Palmdale facility.
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