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Space Science

NEWS
April 29, 1990 | RAY FORMANEK JR., ASSOCIATED PRESS
U.S. scientists are examining bits of leg muscle removed from high-flying rats as part of a joint NASA-Soviet experiment to determine how injured astronauts would heal in a weightless environment. "Our hypotheses go everywhere from disaster to normal healing," said William Stauber, a physiologist at West Virginia University Medical Center and one of two scientists conducting the study.
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NEWS
February 20, 1990 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
A scientific satellite to be launched next year will carry electronic circuits made from high-temperature superconductors for the first tests of the materials in space, researchers said Monday at a meeting of the American Assn. for the Advancement of Science.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 1990 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
IRVINE--Inside Nancy Atlee's classroom at Turtle Rock Elementary School on Friday, dozens of students sat riveted to a television news broadcast on the space shuttle Columbia. To many of these fourth- and fifth-graders, the high-tech drama of Columbia's rescue of an old science satellite--dubbed an LDEF for Long Duration Exposure Facility--took on an added dimension when they learned that they and other schoolchildren across the country may soon be getting a part of the LDEF'S cargo.
SPORTS
April 20, 1989 | JOHN GEIS
Kira Jorgensen made it official Wednesday--she has decided to take UCLA's scholarship offer and run. The Rancho Buena Vista High senior had narrowed her choices to UCLA and Cal-Poly San Luis Obispo and over the weekend put together a list of pros and cons before finally settling on UCLA. "The team, coach (Bob Messina), social life and academics . . . more things just matched up with UCLA than with Cal Poly," Jorgensen said. Jorgensen has been turning heads with record-breaking races in cross-country and track since her freshman year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1988
One of the main rationales for the American space program is the contribution that it makes to science and our knowledge of the world and the universe. Yet space science, as this leg of space is called, is usually overshadowed by the much more glamorous (and dangerous, and expensive) manned space program. The space scientists--whose fields range from planetary exploration to earth sciences to fundamental physics, chemistry and life science--have reason to complain that they don't get no respect.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1988 | DARRELL DAWSEY, Times Staff Writer
As the Milky Way roared overhead in all its celestial splendor and the planets and stars exploded mightily in the utmost corners of the galaxy, 13-year-old Aira Roberson gazed into the handiwork of the gods and waxed profound. "This," she said, nodding slowly in wide-eyed deliberation, "is really neat." Though terse, Roberson's remarks Tuesday during a space film shown on the mammoth, concave screen at the Reuben H.
NEWS
June 29, 1988 | RUDY ABRAMSON, Times Staff Writer
Concluding a massive study of the U.S. space science program, the National Research Council's Space Science Board on Tuesday called for establishment of a satellite network capable of constant observation of the entire Earth. At the same time, it recommended intensive planetary exploration, emphasizing Mars during the last years of the 20th Century and the first of the 21st but including unmanned landings on Mercury and Venus and probes into the atmosphere of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune.
NEWS
June 6, 1988 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
After all the fretting about the demise of space science in the aftermath of the Challenger disaster, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration is gearing up for a series of science missions that will be "unparalleled" in the history of the space program.
NEWS
June 13, 1987 | United Press International
In a major organizational shift, NASA announced guidelines Friday to ensure smooth development of commercial space activities with a heavy emphasis on potentially lucrative materials science. Deputy Administrator Dale D. Myers said the importance of the virtually gravity-free space environment to new technology development warranted special treatment within the agency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1987
As the National Aeronautics and Space Administration struggles to recover from the Challenger accident and get the shuttles flying again, it is seriously neglecting the needs of space science, which has become the stepchild of the space program. Major structural changes are occurring in space-science programs, but they are not being addressed by NASA, which is running the risk of allowing more of the jewels in its crown to lose their luster.
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