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NEWS
May 11, 1987
The first objects to be launched into orbit by a private U.S. company will be a series of five navigation and location satellites, Space Services Inc. announced. Former astronaut Donald K. Slayton, president of Space Services, said his company has agreed to launch the satellites from Wallops Island, Va., a National Aeronautics and Space Administration facility, for Star Fine Inc. of Laguna Niguel, Calif.
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NEWS
May 11, 1987
The first objects to be launched into orbit by a private U.S. company will be a series of five navigation and location satellites, Space Services Inc. announced. Former astronaut Donald K. Slayton, president of Space Services, said his company has agreed to launch the satellites from Wallops Island, Va., a National Aeronautics and Space Administration facility, for Star Fine Inc. of Laguna Niguel, Calif.
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BUSINESS
March 29, 1989 | From Times wire services
The era of private space travel was launched today when the nation's first licensed commercial rocket, carrying six experiments, soared into the sky for a brief suborbital flight and its payload parachuted back to Earth. Starfire 1, owned by Space Services Inc. of America, a small Houston company run by developer David Hannah Jr. and Mercury 7 astronaut Deke Slayton, blasted off into clear blue skies at 8:40 a.m. from White Sands Missile Range.
NEWS
March 30, 1989 | From United Press International
A small commercial rocket carrying six experiments soared into space for a brief suborbital flight Wednesday in a successful mission for a fledgling private space company. Starfire 1, owned by Space Services Inc. of America, a Houston firm run by developer David Hannah Jr. and former astronaut Donald (Deke) Slayton, thundered into clear blue skies from this desolate Army rocket facility. "The launch was picture perfect," said Don Montoya, a spokesman at the missile range. "It went off . . .
NEWS
May 11, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Two Houston entrepreneurs who ran a sweepstakes that promised to send someone rocketing to the Soviet space station Mir for a week agreed to halt their contest in return for the dismissal of charges of operating an illegal lottery. David Mayer and James Davidson, founders of Space Travel Services Inc., told people to dial a 900 telephone number for a fee of $2.99 to enter the random drawing. Prosecutors said the sweepstakes drew about 10,000 telephone calls before it was halted after 24 hours.
NEWS
February 13, 1985 | United Press International
The Transportation Department has granted "mission approval" for preliminary plans of a fledgling rocket company to carry cremated human remains into space in late 1986 or early 1987, it was announced Tuesday. Space Services Inc. of Houston wants to use its own small "Conestoga" rocket for the Celestis Group of Melbourne, Fla., to carry the ashes of more than 10,000 persons into a 1,900-mile-high orbit. Burial in space would cost $3,900, a company spokesman said.
NEWS
October 6, 1989 | BARRY STAVRO, Times Staff Writer
The American Rocket Co.'s effort to launch its first commercial rocket into space never got off the ground Thursday. Instead, at the 10:28 a.m. scheduled liftoff time, the engine ignited but flames snaked up the unmanned, 58-foot-tall rocket. A minute later the rocket tumbled over on its side, puncturing its liquid oxygen fuel tanks, and as the fire continued, a billowing trail of black smoke rose into the sky. There were no injuries in the explosion.
NEWS
August 28, 1989 | From Associated Press
The first U.S. commercial satellite rocket was launched Sunday, propelling a $150-million British communications payload into orbit. The three-stage Delta booster, built by McDonnell Douglas Corp., left a fiery trail in a clear sky as it sped out over the Atlantic Ocean with the 2,700-pound Marcopolo 1 satellite packed in its nose cone.
BUSINESS
October 4, 1989 | From Reuters
From the sands of Florida to the palm-fringed shores of Hawaii, the U.S. government is looking for a beachhead for the next wave of space business: the commercial launch site. Until now, most U.S. commercial payloads have been launched from Cape Canaveral on the Florida coast aboard government vehicles such as the space shuttle. But the first U.S.
BUSINESS
May 8, 1989 | From Associated Press
Using less glamorous and less costly equipment, tiny American Rocket Co. plans to fly private payloads into space more cheaply than NASA, General Dynamics or the other giants of aerospace. The company plans its first private-enterprise space launch this July, which was scheduled after a successful test of its hybrid rocket engine last September. Amroc President George Koopman says the company, based 50 miles northwest of downtown Los Angeles, expects to have four or five paying customers for its first launch.
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