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September 6, 2012
Re "A shuttle trip's ground control," Sept. 4 As I read the article detailing the destruction of 400 beautiful shade trees in South Los Angeles so that the space shuttle Endeavour will be able to make its way from LAX to the California Science Center, I wept - for the trees, for the residents of the affected neighborhoods and for the shortsighted city officials who approved this fiasco. But mostly I wept for the collective heartlessness I see on display. Not one mature tree being destroyed was worth having the shuttle anywhere in this city.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2014 | By Joe Mozingo
Wearing a nitrogen-powered jet pack, Dale Gardner stepped from the space shuttle, alone and untethered, 224 miles above Earth. Armed with a 5-foot probe called a stinger, Gardner drifted toward a wayward satellite, the Westar 6, which was spinning slowly, 35 feet away. When he got close enough Gardner inserted the stinger into the orbiter's spent rocket nozzle and brought it to a halt. "I got it," he exclaimed. The mission to salvage the Westar and another communications satellite, the Palapa B-2, in November 1984 marked a high point of the space shuttle program, feeding a growing sense of NASA's infallibility that would end just a year later, when the Challenger exploded just after launch over Florida.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 2012 | By Deirdre Edgar
Staff in The Times' downtown Los Angeles office had a prime viewing spot as the space shuttle Endeavour flew over Southern California for the last time. Other staff were around the region to report on the shuttle's final journey . Some of their comments from the historic flyby ... [ View the story "Times staff plays #SpottheShuttle" on Storify ]   readers.representative@latimes.com Follow the Readers' Rep on Twitter and Google+  
NEWS
February 25, 2014 | By Amy Hubbard
The Hennessey Performance Venom GT barreled down the space shuttle landing runway at Kennedy Space Center recently, blazing a speed record -- faster than previous record-setting supercars and faster than the space shuttle when it touches down. The Venom GT hit 270.49 mph. The previous record was the Bugatti Veyron Super Sport, which clocked 267.80 mph. The space shuttle touches down at a relatively sedate 225 mph. Video of the record chase was a winner on YouTube with more than 600,000 views as of Tuesday morning.
NATIONAL
January 6, 2013 | By Scott Powers
ORLANDO, Fla. - Does anyone need a 15,000-foot landing strip? How about a place to assemble rocket ships? Or a parachute-packing plant? A launchpad? Make us an offer, says NASA, which is quietly holding a going-out-of-business sale for the facilities used by its space shuttle program. The last shuttle flight was in July 2011, when Atlantis made its final touchdown. That orbiter, like its sisters Discovery and Endeavour, is now a museum piece . As soon as some remaining cleanup is finished at Kennedy Space Center, the shuttle program will be history.
BUSINESS
February 15, 2012 | By Patrick McMahon
With end of the space shuttle program, NASA is retiring one of its two modified Boeing 747 jetliners that were used to fly shuttle aircraft -- piggyback style -- from their West Coast landing site at Edwards Air Force Base in the Mojave desert back to Cape Canaveral, Fla., for more flights. Used for 21 years, the space agency's shuttle carrier aircraft NASA 911 last week flew its last mission - a 20-minute excursion - from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards to Dryden's aircraft operations facility in nearby Palmdale.
NATIONAL
April 25, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
The Big Apple will have to wait a few more days for its space shuttle to arrive. The retiring space shuttle Enterprise was supposed to arrive Wednesday, but bad weather delayed the plans for a dramatic New York City flyover. (The flyover was originally supposed to happen Monday, but an unfavorable forecast scuttled those plans, too.) NASA said Wednesday that the rendezvous could now take place Friday -- Mother Nature permitting. The highly anticipated flyover comes as the space shuttle heads into retirement at the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum this summer in New York City.
NATIONAL
March 22, 2013
WASHINGTON - So what if it never flew into space? The retired space shuttle Enterprise, NASA's test orbiter, has been added to the National Register of Historic Places. The orbiter, now at New York City's Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum, becomes the first space shuttle to receive the honorary designation. The National Park Service described the orbiter as "exceptionally significant" because of its role in the shuttle program. New York landed the Enterprise after a fierce national competition for the retired shuttles.
NATIONAL
April 27, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
The space shuttle Enterprise has two big thumbs up: Both NASA and the FAA have given clearance to transport the shuttle to New York City on Friday morning, setting the stage for a dramatic flyover of the world's most famous skyline. The Big Apple has been waiting for this moment all week. The shuttle Enterprise was originally supposed to arrive Monday, and then Wednesday. But bad weather scuttled those plans. It's now scheduled to occur today between 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Eastern.
NATIONAL
November 2, 2012 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON--The last of the retired space shuttles is headed for its final landing. Atlantis was making its 9.8-mile journey Friday from Florida's Kennedy Space Center to its permanent new home at the nearby visitors complex. "Godspeed Atlantis, on your next mission of inspiration and motivation," NASA Administrator Charles Bolden said. VIDEO: Timelapse journey of Endeavour "It's now NASA's honor to permanently house this magnificent spacecraft right here where she rose to the skies 33 times carrying 156 men and women," said Bolden, a former astronaut who flew on Atlantis.
BUSINESS
February 14, 2014 | James Barragan
Bob Thompson fondly remembers when Downey was buzzing with pride and payrolls as a major hub for work on the Apollo space program and the construction site for six space shuttles. "Since the beginning of time, we had all these world leaders who looked up at the moon," said Thompson, a 72-year-old local history buff who worked for 34 years on the site where the spacecraft were built. "Here in Downey we built the vehicles that put the first man on the moon, and that is why it's a great source of pride.
BUSINESS
December 11, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
A year after the Air Force blasted it into orbit, an experimental space drone continues to circle the Earth. Its mission and hush-hush payload, however, remain a mystery. The X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle, which looks like a miniature unmanned version of the space shuttle, was launched from Cape Canaveral, Fla., on Dec. 11, 2012.  At the time of launch, Air Force officials offered few details about the mission, saying that the space plane simply provided a way to test new technologies in space, such as satellite sensors and other components.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2013 | By Kate Mather
The space shuttle Endeavour arrived at the California Science Center nearly one year ago, and the Exposition Park museum is throwing its crown jewel quite the anniversary party. Saturday marks the second day of "Endeavour Fest," a three-day event featuring astronaut presentations, film screenings and other displays related to science and engineering. The museum will also have on display the SpaceX Dragon -- the first commercial spacecraft to make a successful delivery to the International Space Station -- and the capsule and pressurized suit Felix Baumgartner used when making his recent record-breaking leap from the stratosphere.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2013 | Kate Mather, Los Angeles Times
Tens of thousands of spectators crowded sidewalks and rooftops last October as the space shuttle Endeavour crawled across the streets of Los Angeles and Inglewood, an overwhelming welcome home for the retired spacecraft. Two weeks later, when the California Science Center opened the shuttle to public view, attendance at the Exposition Park museum surged. In just a few months, more than 1 million people visited the Science Center, which had averaged roughly 1.6 million visitors per year prior to the shuttle's arrival.
TRAVEL
October 6, 2013 | By Jane Engle
HUNTSVILLE, Ala. - I was inept at moonwalking. My rocket was a dud. And I crashed the space shuttle. Fortunately, I was just an astronaut wannabe and not the real deal. But it's as close as this middle-aged space geek is going to get. That geekiness, inspired by IMAX documentaries on space and news coverage of NASA's final shuttle launch in 2011, was what brought me to Adult Space Academy. The trip was a gift from my wife. The three-day program is among more than a dozen versions of Space Camp, which the U.S. Space & Rocket Center in Huntsville created more than 30 years ago to give visitors a taste of what it's like to train as an astronaut.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2013 | By Walter Hamilton
The gig: Richard Plump is chief executive of Plump Engineering Inc., an Anaheim architectural engineering firm with 38 employees. Plump helped oversee the transportation of the space shuttle Endeavour from Los Angeles International Airport to the California Science Center in Exposition Park last year. He made sure the spacecraft did not damage streets or underground pipes as it wound through a 12-mile stretch of Inglewood and Los Angeles. He had previously overseen the movement of the huge rock that's now at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Troubled childhood: Plump, 51, overcame a difficult childhood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2013 | By Kate Mather
The space shuttle Endeavour arrived at the California Science Center nearly one year ago, and the Exposition Park museum is throwing its crown jewel quite the anniversary party. Saturday marks the second day of "Endeavour Fest," a three-day event featuring astronaut presentations, film screenings and other displays related to science and engineering. The museum will also have on display the SpaceX Dragon -- the first commercial spacecraft to make a successful delivery to the International Space Station -- and the capsule and pressurized suit Felix Baumgartner used when making his recent record-breaking leap from the stratosphere.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 1996
As an aerospace engineer with much space shuttle experience, including service on a National Academy of Science panel on the subject, I'd like to comment on "Problems Overcome, Shuttle Lands Safely" (April 1). The shuttle is a '70s bird wearing out in the late 1990s. It got home this time after many malfunctions, but for how long? A new starter doesn't make a new car. In my estimation it will be only a short time until we kill 10 or so more of our most capable citizens. Each time a shuttle lifts off, the U.S. public is out at least $500 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2013 | By Steve Chawkins
C. Gordon Fullerton waited years for his chance to go into space but less than six minutes after the space shuttle Challenger took off in 1985, he was starting to rethink it. One of the Challenger's three main engines suddenly shut down and Fullerton, the mission's commander, didn't know whether the others would follow. "Absolutely, with no warning - kapow! - there was an immediate drop in acceleration," he later told reporters. "The red light came on, and there we were. " Fullerton and pilot Roy Bridges immediately dumped a load of surplus fuel, worked the two remaining engines harder, and maneuvered the Challenger into orbit just 45 miles lower than planned.
BUSINESS
May 16, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
A white-and-black space plane, very much resembling the now-retired space shuttle, was trucked to a NASA flight center in the Mojave Desert to begin a round of testing to see if it has the right stuff to carry astronauts one day. Tucked under a white tarp, the space plane called Dream Chaser arrived Wednesday at Dryden Flight Research Center inside Edwards Air Force Base. Tests at Dryden will include tow, captive-carry and free-flight of the Dream Chaser. PHOTOS: A 'new era': Private-sector space mission The tests come as part of a contract with NASA's Commercial Crew Program, which is aimed at helping private companies develop spacecraft and rockets capable of launching astronauts from American soil, now that the space shuttle fleet is retired.
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