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Space Shuttle Atlantis

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NEWS
July 6, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
The blastoff of the space shuttle Atlantis , the last launch planned in America's manned shuttle program, is on the bubble. NASA on Wednesday put the chance of a Friday launch from Florida's Kennedy Space Center at just 30%, blaming a possible delay on forecast storms and rain. Meanwhile, the schedule for what's officially known as STS-135 hasn't changed from 8:26 a.m. PDT Friday. While about 1 million people are expected to watch the historic event in person in Florida, you can also view it at special big-screen showings in Southern California and other places.
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NEWS
July 31, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Travelers who go to the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida next week will have an opportunity to watch a night launch of a Delta 4 rocket near the Cape Canaveral site. Those who buy tickets to visit the center Aug. 7 can stick around for the launch currently scheduled to blast off from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station between 8:29 and 9:18 p.m. local time (subject to change). Visitors can bring lawn chairs to the center's viewing area where they'll also hear live commentary from mission control.
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NATIONAL
October 20, 2012 | By Richard Simon
Granted, moving Atlantis, the last of the retired space shuttles, won't be as difficult as Endeavour's recent, and tortuous, trip through Los Angeles. That journey required the chopping down of hundreds of trees - and Endeavour arrived 16 hours behind schedule Still, moving Atlantis 9.8 miles will be no piece of cake. “You're talking about 165,000 pounds, a national treasure, a priceless artifact.... No pressure," said Tim Macy, director of project development and construction for Delaware North Cos., which operates the Kennedy Space Center visitors complex in Florida.
NATIONAL
October 22, 2012 | By Amy Hubbard
As crew members, including NASA's Kevin Ford, prepared for the launch from Kazakstan on Tuesday that would take them to the International Space Station, the trio did some astronaut bonding, horsing around with their spacesuits. Ford also sounded an optimistic note about the future of a space station whose cost of about $100 billion over the last dozen years has been criticized .  The NASA astronaut -- who will launch Tuesday about 4:51 a.m. Pacific time with Soyuz Commander Oleg Novitskiy and Flight Engineer Evgeny Tarelkin -- said at a news conference Monday that the best was yet to come for the space station.
NEWS
November 6, 1994 | From Associated Press
They cooled it down, then warmed it up. They turned it off and on, again and again. Nothing worked--a German ozone monitor flying on the space shuttle Atlantis refused to collect data despite ground controllers' coaxing. Researchers were not giving up, but they held out little hope Saturday. "Realistically speaking, we feel that there is very little chance of obtaining any more science data," said Gerd Hartmann, a German scientist in charge of the experiment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1992 | LISA R. OMPHROY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ten-year-old Maureen Teyssier sat cross-legged on the floor with other students at Jerabek School in Scripps Ranch as her teacher and principal tried to quiet the 200 excited children and camcorder-wielding parents who packed the auditorium before dawn Wednesday. Given the sky-high excitement in the crowd, they seemed to have their work cut out for them.
NEWS
October 4, 1990 | From United Press International
The space shuttle Atlantis may have been damaged when a 70-pound metal beam mistakenly left in the craft's engine room fell as the orbiter was being hoisted into the launch position, sources said today. With the shuttle Discovery on track for blastoff Saturday, Atlantis is scheduled for launch around Nov. 7 to ferry a military satellite into orbit.
NATIONAL
September 4, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
NASA restarted its countdown clocks at the Kennedy Space Center for the launch this week of the U.S. space shuttle Atlantis after a week's postponement due to a lightning strike and a storm. Liftoff of the shuttle and its six-member crew is scheduled for Wednesday afternoon.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
ABC, CBS, NBC and CNN will air live coverage of Friday's launch of the space shuttle Atlantis, scheduled to blast off at 11:24 a.m. (PDT). The launch is the second of seven shuttle missions scheduled for this year.
NEWS
April 28, 1989 | From Associated Press
Television networks ABC, NBC, CBS and CNN plan to air live coverage today of the launch of the space shuttle Atlantis, scheduled to blast off at 11:24 a.m. PDT from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.
NATIONAL
October 22, 2012 | By Tina Susman
A little girl wearing a black-and-white Halloween costume was mistaken for a skunk and shot by a relative at a party, police in Pennsylvania said. The 9-year-old was hit in the shoulder but was alert and talking as she was taken to a hospital in Pittsburgh after the incident Saturday night in New Sewickley Township, according to the Beaver County Times. New Sewickley is in western Pennsylvania near the Ohio border. According to media reports, the girl, wearing a black hat with a white tassel, was hiding over the edge of a hill outside the house where the party was taking place when she was spotted by a relative about 8:30 p.m. Thinking the distant figure was a skunk, he fired a shotgun.
NATIONAL
October 20, 2012 | By Joseph Serna
An Oregon man is scheduled to be arraigned Monday in the murder of a neighbor whose disappearance this week had, as one official put it, shaken the community to its core. Jonathan Daniel Holt, 25, is being held without bail at the Multnomah County Jail on suspicion of killing 21-year-old Whitney Heichel sometime after her disappearance on her way to work as a Starbucks barista Tuesday morning. Police said Holt, a neighbor and acquaintance of Heichel and her husband, was linked to her killing by evidence in her car and on her cellphone.
NATIONAL
October 20, 2012 | By Richard Simon
Granted, moving Atlantis, the last of the retired space shuttles, won't be as difficult as Endeavour's recent, and tortuous, trip through Los Angeles. That journey required the chopping down of hundreds of trees - and Endeavour arrived 16 hours behind schedule Still, moving Atlantis 9.8 miles will be no piece of cake. “You're talking about 165,000 pounds, a national treasure, a priceless artifact.... No pressure," said Tim Macy, director of project development and construction for Delaware North Cos., which operates the Kennedy Space Center visitors complex in Florida.
NATIONAL
July 8, 2011 | By Ralph Vartabedian and W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Space shuttle Atlantis rumbled like a freight train into orbit Friday in its historic last flight, lighting up a slate gray Florida sky that reflected the deep doubts about the future of the U.S. human space flight program. The orbiter disappeared into dense clouds just 20 seconds after lifting off from the Kennedy Space Center, leaving crowds who flocked to the region craning to get a final glimpse of the iconic spacecraft. Storms across the Gulf of Mexico had threatened to delay the launch, but the skies miraculously cleared Friday morning and set up the conditions for a perfect launch for the 30-year-old program.
NATIONAL
July 8, 2011 | By Ralph Vartabedian and W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Cape Canaveral, Fla. Atlantis lifted off Friday morning, shooting straight into a brightening sky on a 12-day mission that marks the end of the nation's three-decade space shuttle program. There was a brief hold in the countdown at 31 seconds because of a glitch seemingly involving a piece of retractable equipment. As millions of onlookers on the ground and via television held their breaths, officials checked and reported that the equipment had, indeed, been moved.
NEWS
July 6, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
The blastoff of the space shuttle Atlantis , the last launch planned in America's manned shuttle program, is on the bubble. NASA on Wednesday put the chance of a Friday launch from Florida's Kennedy Space Center at just 30%, blaming a possible delay on forecast storms and rain. Meanwhile, the schedule for what's officially known as STS-135 hasn't changed from 8:26 a.m. PDT Friday. While about 1 million people are expected to watch the historic event in person in Florida, you can also view it at special big-screen showings in Southern California and other places.
SCIENCE
September 27, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
NASA is delaying next month's shuttle launch to the Hubble Space Telescope because of problems stemming from Hurricane Ike and replacement parts for the observatory. Space shuttle Atlantis is now set to blast off late at night on Oct. 14 for the last visit to the orbiting telescope, officials said this week. Liftoff had been scheduled for Oct. 10. Endeavour's space station mission has been delayed until Nov. 16.
SCIENCE
May 24, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
NASA's final visit to the Hubble Space Telescope is now set for Oct. 8. The space shuttle Atlantis and a crew of seven were supposed to fly to Hubble at the end of August to repair and upgrade the 18-year-old telescope. But the mission was delayed because of extra time needed to build the shuttle fuel tanks required for the flight and to prepare a potential rescue mission.
NEWS
July 5, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
If you're heading to Florida's Space Coast in hopes of seeing the final space shuttle, Atlantis, take off Friday, expect to be shoulder to shoulder with about 1 million people. Hotel bookings are setting a record. And take note: The launch date is under a cloud--literally. The launch will mark the end of the three-decade-old manned shuttle program. Atlantis is scheduled to blast off at 11:26 a.m. EDT Friday,  though NASA's online shuttle report said a 60% chance of showers and storms forecast for Friday could delay the launch.
NATIONAL
May 25, 2009 | Ari B. Bloomekatz
The space shuttle Atlantis and its crew of seven returned to Earth on Sunday at Edwards Air Force Base in the Mojave Desert, announcing its approach with twin sonic booms. Atlantis circled Earth 197 times and traveled 5.3 million miles before ending its daring 13-day mission to refurbish the Hubble Space Telescope. The shuttle, which landed at 8:39 a.m., had been diverted to California after nasty weather prevented a landing at Kennedy Space Center in Florida.
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