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Space Shuttle Communications

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April 7, 1991 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The five astronauts aboard the space shuttle Atlantis spent Saturday preparing for two days of intense activity, including the first spacewalk in more than five years, and took a few minutes off to talk with schoolchildren about the adventures of space flight. Today, physicist Linda M. Godwin, 38, will use the shuttle's robotic arm to lift a $617-million observatory out of the Atlantis' cargo bay.
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NEWS
April 7, 1991 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The five astronauts aboard the space shuttle Atlantis spent Saturday preparing for two days of intense activity, including the first spacewalk in more than five years, and took a few minutes off to talk with schoolchildren about the adventures of space flight. Today, physicist Linda M. Godwin, 38, will use the shuttle's robotic arm to lift a $617-million observatory out of the Atlantis' cargo bay.
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SCIENCE
October 7, 2013 | By Amy Hubbard
The Draconid meteor shower appears each October, and it can produce a big show or a big shrug. Tonight, however, there's reason for hope. The Draconids - expected to peak Monday around sunset - occur annually thanks to the ribbon of space dust left behind by Giacobini-Zinner, a comet that travels around the sun every 6½ years. In October, Earth passes through this dust, and as pieces of  filament encounter our atmosphere, light streaks through the sky. What's great about the Draconids is that, although generally more faint, they're slower-moving meteors, so the light trails linger.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1994 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Picture a man who almost single-handedly built an airport in a remote part of the Mojave Desert. He carved a landing strip into the brush- and rock-covered land, erected a couple of hangars and lives out there--at the end of a dirt road not even in the Thomas Guide--in a trailer with his dog, Shadow.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1993 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Picture a man who almost single-handedly built an airport in a remote part of the Mojave Desert. He carved a landing strip into the brush- and rock-covered land, erected a couple of hangars and lives out there alone--at the end of a dirt road not found in the Thomas Guide--in a trailer with his dog, Shadow.
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