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Space Shuttle Missions

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
David M. Walker, an astronaut who made four space shuttle flights, including the 1989 flight that launched a probe that mapped the surface of Venus, died Monday of cancer. He was 56. Walker died at the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, NASA spokeswoman Eileen Hawley said. Among the first group of space shuttle astronauts chosen by NASA in 1978, Walker flew as a pilot aboard the shuttle Discovery in 1984 and went on to command three shuttle missions, in 1989, 1992 and 1995.
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OPINION
September 14, 2013
Re "NASA confirms Voyager milestone," Sept. 13 Iread of Voyager 1 leaving our solar system with more excitement, pride and soaring emotion than I had expected. I'm a retired teacher, and I remember the excitement that Voyager 1 stirred when it was launched in 1977. It was proof of American ingenuity, a measure of our national resolve to be first in everything we tried to accomplish. My students' imaginations were fired up by America's achievements in space. In fact, two of them went on to earn seats on space shuttle missions.
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NEWS
October 1, 1989
NASA named astronaut crews for five space shuttle missions scheduled for 1990 and 1991, including the first black woman selected for space flight. Dr. Mae C. Jemison, 32, a physician, was assigned as a mission specialist to a June, 1991, flight aboard the shuttle Discovery. The mission is to conduct life sciences and materials processing experiments. She was working with Cigna Health Plans of California and as a general practitioner in Los Angeles when selected for the astronaut program in
NATIONAL
September 20, 2011 | By Mark K. Matthews, Washington Bureau
If NASA ever wants to send astronauts to Mars, it first must solve a problem that has nothing to do with rockets or radiation exposure. A newly discovered eye condition found to erode the vision of some astronauts who have spent months aboard the International Space Station has doctors worried that future explorers could go blind by the end of long missions, such as a multiyear trip to Mars. Although blindness is the worst-case scenario, the threat of blurred vision is enough that NASA has asked scores of researchers to study the issue and has put special eyeglasses on the space station to help those affected.
NEWS
August 30, 1988 | Associated Press
Workers at the Kennedy Space Center on Monday finished loading the space shuttle Discovery's cargo bay with a $100-million satellite nearly identical to one destroyed in the 1986 Challenger explosion. The Tracking and Data Relay Satellite, designed to help ground controllers monitor shuttles and their payloads, is the principal cargo for the 26th space shuttle mission, scheduled for late September or early October.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1997
Re "Atlantis Blasts Off for a Mission to Troubled Russian Space Station," Sept. 26: I have been a supporter of NASA and our space program for over 30 years, but NASA's continued funding of expensive space shuttle missions to dock with the Russian Mir space station strains credibility. The Mir safety questions notwithstanding, NASA has lost its ability to state a clear program of goals and objectives for space exploration to the taxpayer. Instead, we continue to spend millions of dollars to send our astronauts up on an aging shuttle fleet to an even more aging Mir. What science is being gleaned from all this?
OPINION
September 14, 2013
Re "NASA confirms Voyager milestone," Sept. 13 Iread of Voyager 1 leaving our solar system with more excitement, pride and soaring emotion than I had expected. I'm a retired teacher, and I remember the excitement that Voyager 1 stirred when it was launched in 1977. It was proof of American ingenuity, a measure of our national resolve to be first in everything we tried to accomplish. My students' imaginations were fired up by America's achievements in space. In fact, two of them went on to earn seats on space shuttle missions.
NATIONAL
September 20, 2011 | By Mark K. Matthews, Washington Bureau
If NASA ever wants to send astronauts to Mars, it first must solve a problem that has nothing to do with rockets or radiation exposure. A newly discovered eye condition found to erode the vision of some astronauts who have spent months aboard the International Space Station has doctors worried that future explorers could go blind by the end of long missions, such as a multiyear trip to Mars. Although blindness is the worst-case scenario, the threat of blurred vision is enough that NASA has asked scores of researchers to study the issue and has put special eyeglasses on the space station to help those affected.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1995 | JOEL GREENBERG
"Rescue Mission in Space" is so understated in title and presentation that one might expect this "Nova" program on the 1993 repair of the Hubble Space Telescope to be as dull and routine as most space shuttle missions have become. Not so. "Rescue"--perhaps because of its no-frills approach to this real-life drama--has more suspense than most made-for-TV space movies could ever hope for. Start with the plot: A $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1989 | Associated Press
A Chatsworth aerospace company has been fined $340,000 and two of its top officials sentenced to prison for manufacturing and supplying defective fasteners used on the rocket boosters of National Aeronautics and Space Administration's space shuttles, federal officials said Wednesday. Darrell Lee of Simi Valley, president of Lee Aerospace Products Inc., and vice president Jerry Martin were convicted Sept. 22 in U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2008 | Joe Holley, Washington Post
G. David Low, a NASA astronaut who served on three space shuttle missions before becoming a space industry executive, died March 15 of colon cancer at a hospital in Reston, Va. He was 52. During his 12 years as an astronaut, Low logged more than 714 hours in space, circling Earth more than 540 times. In June 1993, he was payload commander aboard the Endeavour, launched to recover the free-flying European Retrievable Carrier satellite.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2001
Pamela Hilliard Robertson, 38, a NASA astronaut, died May 24 of severe burns received in the crash of a small plane outside Houston. Robertson, scheduled to take a space shuttle mission next year, was the passenger in a plane piloted by Roy Mack Paul Adams, 46, of Alvin, Texas, which was practicing landing and takeoff maneuvers. Witnesses said the plane cartwheeled and crashed into some trees, bursting into flames seconds later.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
David M. Walker, an astronaut who made four space shuttle flights, including the 1989 flight that launched a probe that mapped the surface of Venus, died Monday of cancer. He was 56. Walker died at the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, NASA spokeswoman Eileen Hawley said. Among the first group of space shuttle astronauts chosen by NASA in 1978, Walker flew as a pilot aboard the shuttle Discovery in 1984 and went on to command three shuttle missions, in 1989, 1992 and 1995.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1997
Re "Atlantis Blasts Off for a Mission to Troubled Russian Space Station," Sept. 26: I have been a supporter of NASA and our space program for over 30 years, but NASA's continued funding of expensive space shuttle missions to dock with the Russian Mir space station strains credibility. The Mir safety questions notwithstanding, NASA has lost its ability to state a clear program of goals and objectives for space exploration to the taxpayer. Instead, we continue to spend millions of dollars to send our astronauts up on an aging shuttle fleet to an even more aging Mir. What science is being gleaned from all this?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1997 | EMILY OTANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Astronaut Franklin Chang-Diaz has boarded a NASA space shuttle, flown above Earth's atmosphere and circled the planet 252 times. But this--this was hard work. Friday, he was rocketed by no-holds barred questions from 1,800 students at three Orange County schools on topics such as bathroom habits in space and UFOs. Tough crowd. Chang-Diaz, 46, is a veteran of five space shuttle missions and was the first Latino in space.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1995 | JOEL GREENBERG
"Rescue Mission in Space" is so understated in title and presentation that one might expect this "Nova" program on the 1993 repair of the Hubble Space Telescope to be as dull and routine as most space shuttle missions have become. Not so. "Rescue"--perhaps because of its no-frills approach to this real-life drama--has more suspense than most made-for-TV space movies could ever hope for. Start with the plot: A $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1997 | EMILY OTANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Astronaut Franklin Chang-Diaz has boarded a NASA space shuttle, flown above Earth's atmosphere and circled the planet 252 times. But this--this was hard work. Friday, he was rocketed by no-holds barred questions from 1,800 students at three Orange County schools on topics such as bathroom habits in space and UFOs. Tough crowd. Chang-Diaz, 46, is a veteran of five space shuttle missions and was the first Latino in space.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1991 | LYNDA NATALI
Neck cranked skyward, 10-year-old Matthew Cheney carefully surveyed the looming clouds. Ordinarily, the subtleties of cumulus and cirrus would be about as exciting to him as a trip to the principal's office. But Thursday was anything but ordinary for the freckle-nosed Matthew. He was helping to land the space shuttle.
NEWS
November 29, 1993 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As if moving among gravestones, Vladimir Lozovitsky shambled between the silenced forms of high-tech equipment at the Molnya Design Bureau. He was virtually alone in the 10-story testing laboratory where he works, and the sound of his footsteps clattered off the walls. "My entire life is connected with this plant," said Lozovitsky, 57.
NEWS
June 4, 1992 | BERNICE HIRABAYASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aspiring astronaut Kristen Burton, 18, came face to face earlier this week with a hero straight out of her dreams. "It's amazing I got to meet somebody that has actually been up in space," said the St. Bernard High School senior. "Just to shake his hand is incredible." Burton and more than 1,000 students and teachers at the Catholic school in Playa del Rey gathered in the gym Monday to hear a personal account of the U.S.
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