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Space Shuttle Program

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BUSINESS
November 1, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Services
A federal grand jury in Iowa indicted Rockwell International, along with one current and one former manager, for defrauding the government on the space shuttle program--the third time in a decade that the aerospace firm has been criminally charged. A 15-count indictment, returned in U.S. District Court in Cedar Rapids, charges conspiracy, mail and wire fraud and false claims, alleging that the firm inflated its charges under a cost-plus type contract on the program.
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NATIONAL
April 12, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
Officials at NASA and SpaceX were working through the weekend to see whether they could still safely rocket a cargo capsule to the International Space Station on Monday, despite the failure of one of the backup computers in the system that helps dock the pod in space. While workers continued to prepare for a Monday afternoon launch, NASA said a final determination would likely come Sunday afternoon. The deployment of 5,000 pounds of supplies to the space station by SpaceX's unmanned Falcon 9 rocket has already been delayed a month because of other technical issues.
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OPINION
July 16, 2011
L.A.'s water visionary Re "Mulholland's Los Angeles," Editorial, July 10 Though he was a poor geologist (the St. Francis Dam disaster), William Mulholland's environmental legacy is remarkably positive. His 220-mile-long aqueduct is an engineering masterpiece, entirely gravity-fed. It produces hydroelectric power. Contrast this with the California State Water Project of the1970s, which expends more energy than any single operation in California to pump water over the Tehachapi Mountains.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2014 | By Joe Mozingo
Wearing a nitrogen-powered jet pack, Dale Gardner stepped from the space shuttle, alone and untethered, 224 miles above Earth. Armed with a 5-foot probe called a stinger, Gardner drifted toward a wayward satellite, the Westar 6, which was spinning slowly, 35 feet away. When he got close enough Gardner inserted the stinger into the orbiter's spent rocket nozzle and brought it to a halt. "I got it," he exclaimed. The mission to salvage the Westar and another communications satellite, the Palapa B-2, in November 1984 marked a high point of the space shuttle program, feeding a growing sense of NASA's infallibility that would end just a year later, when the Challenger exploded just after launch over Florida.
NATIONAL
May 10, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A former Marine officer who has held engineering and management jobs in three NASA centers is taking over as manager of the space shuttle program as the space agency tries to recover from the Columbia disaster. William W. Parsons, 47-year-old director of NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center in Mississippi, was named the new manager of the space shuttle program, succeeding Ron Dittemore, who acted as NASA's most prominent spokesman after the loss of Columbia.
NEWS
February 3, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The head of NASA's space shuttle program resigned after expressing concern to space agency officials about cost-cutting measures that will change the program's management structure. Bryan D. O'Connor, 49, a former astronaut and Marine Corps pilot, said he will leave the program at the end of the month "to pursue other interests."
BUSINESS
March 22, 1994 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rockwell's space systems division will subcontract its data processing to an Orange County computer maintenance company in a move that will mean at least 70 layoffs at Rockwell's headquarters in Seal Beach.
BUSINESS
March 15, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne, the rocket engine manufacturing business in the San Fernando Valley that helped pioneer space exploration in the 1960s, is officially up for sale by its parent company. With headquarters in Canoga Park, Rocketdyne builds rocket engines at a sprawling 47-acre facility near the Westfield Topanga shopping mall. The company is perhaps best known as the maker of the space shuttles' main rocket engines. But it also develops engines for military rockets and missiles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2014 | By Joe Mozingo
Wearing a nitrogen-powered jet pack, Dale Gardner stepped from the space shuttle, alone and untethered, 224 miles above Earth. Armed with a 5-foot probe called a stinger, Gardner drifted toward a wayward satellite, the Westar 6, which was spinning slowly, 35 feet away. When he got close enough Gardner inserted the stinger into the orbiter's spent rocket nozzle and brought it to a halt. "I got it," he exclaimed. The mission to salvage the Westar and another communications satellite, the Palapa B-2, in November 1984 marked a high point of the space shuttle program, feeding a growing sense of NASA's infallibility that would end just a year later, when the Challenger exploded just after launch over Florida.
NEWS
July 15, 1986 | United Press International
The journalist-in-space project has been put on hold because of indefinite delays in the space shuttle program, NASA reported Monday. Forty national semifinalists were to be notified by letter of the postponement.
NEWS
July 31, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
A biography of Sally Ride, America's first female astronaut, will be published in 2013, Simon & Schuster announced Tuesday. Ride died at age 61 of pancreatic cancer just eight days ago. The as-yet-untitled book will be written by journalist Lynn Sherr, who spent more than 30 years with ABC News, covered the space shuttle program for ABC from 1981 to 1986 and got to know Ride through her work. Ride was not recruited to be an astronaut - she was one of 8,300 people who answered a want ad. After leaving the space program, Ride became involved in encouraging young women to study science.
BUSINESS
March 15, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne, the rocket engine manufacturing business in the San Fernando Valley that helped pioneer space exploration in the 1960s, is officially up for sale by its parent company. With headquarters in Canoga Park, Rocketdyne builds rocket engines at a sprawling 47-acre facility near the Westfield Topanga shopping mall. The company is perhaps best known as the maker of the space shuttles' main rocket engines. But it also develops engines for military rockets and missiles.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2011 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
A cracked cosmonaut helmet, footsteps in the moon dust, a mysterious flash of light outside a spaceship window — these are some of the images the Weinstein Co. has released from "Apollo 18," a documentary-style sci-fi thriller opening Friday that the studio is marketing as a movie culled from "found footage" from a U.S. space mission. "In 1972, the United States sent two astronauts on a secret mission to the moon," the trailer says. "Despite decades of denial by NASA and the Department of Defense, classified footage of the mission was leaked to the media.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2011
NASA fans distraught over the end of the space shuttle program may find a bit of solace in the presentation "Apollo 15 + 40 Years: Serious Science on the Moon," which chronicles the fourth manned lunar landing, in 1971, through video and photographs. John Drescher Planetarium, Santa Monica College, 1900 Pico Blvd., Santa Monica. 8 p.m. Fri. $5 general admission, $4 seniors and children. (310) 434-3005. http://www.smc.edu/planetarium.
OPINION
July 16, 2011
L.A.'s water visionary Re "Mulholland's Los Angeles," Editorial, July 10 Though he was a poor geologist (the St. Francis Dam disaster), William Mulholland's environmental legacy is remarkably positive. His 220-mile-long aqueduct is an engineering masterpiece, entirely gravity-fed. It produces hydroelectric power. Contrast this with the California State Water Project of the1970s, which expends more energy than any single operation in California to pump water over the Tehachapi Mountains.
OPINION
July 10, 2011 | By George Alexander
I began covering the space shuttle project in 1972, soon after President Nixon authorized it. I had recently joined this newspaper as a science writer. And the country was enthusiastic about the idea of a reusable spacecraft, which was expected to be sturdy, economical and reliable. The shuttle turned out to be neither economical nor sturdy, and its reliability has been wobbly. But as I watched the shuttle Atlantis blast off into space on what will be the 135th and final space shuttle mission, I found myself feeling a bit nostalgic.
NEWS
March 29, 1996 | Associated Press
Wilbur Trafton, director of NASA's space station program for two years, on Thursday was put in charge of the space shuttle program as well. He was named associate administrator for the Office of Space Flight.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2011 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
A cracked cosmonaut helmet, footsteps in the moon dust, a mysterious flash of light outside a spaceship window — these are some of the images the Weinstein Co. has released from "Apollo 18," a documentary-style sci-fi thriller opening Friday that the studio is marketing as a movie culled from "found footage" from a U.S. space mission. "In 1972, the United States sent two astronauts on a secret mission to the moon," the trailer says. "Despite decades of denial by NASA and the Department of Defense, classified footage of the mission was leaked to the media.
NATIONAL
July 8, 2011 | By Ralph Vartabedian and W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Cape Canaveral, Fla. Atlantis lifted off Friday morning, shooting straight into a brightening sky on a 12-day mission that marks the end of the nation's three-decade space shuttle program. There was a brief hold in the countdown at 31 seconds because of a glitch seemingly involving a piece of retractable equipment. As millions of onlookers on the ground and via television held their breaths, officials checked and reported that the equipment had, indeed, been moved.
BUSINESS
July 5, 2011 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Bob Kahl slips in through a side door of the vast, abandoned hangar and looks at what's left of the assembly plant where he worked for nearly 40 years. He remembers the hum of power tools, the biting aroma of cutting oil, swarms of workers plugging away on a labyrinth of yellow scaffolding. All that's left is a few piles of broken concrete and a sea of colorless dust that coats a Palmdale factory floor the size of two football fields. "Welcome to the birthplace of America's space shuttle fleet," said Kahl, 60, smiling.
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