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Space Station Freedom

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NEWS
June 30, 1989 | From United Press International
NASA has chosen 27 scientific experiments that will examine everything from cosmic dust to tropical rain patterns to fly aboard the planned space station Freedom, the agency announced Thursday. Officials said 14 of the experiments will be mounted aboard elements of the space station's structure during its construction phase. Thirteen others will lay groundwork for more complicated research that will demand greater power and data-handling capacity than Freedom is expected to have in its initial stages.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 2005 | From the Washington Post
William W.L. Taylor, a co-founder of a project that turned thousands of high school students into radio wave researchers, died of a heart attack July 16 at his home in Washington, D.C. He was 62. A former chief scientist of NASA's Space Station Freedom, Taylor was president of INSPIRE -- Interactive NASA Space Physics Ionosphere Radio Experiments -- one of the pioneering successes in NASA Sun-Earth Connection Education.
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NEWS
April 30, 1992 | From a Times Staff Writer
The House on Wednesday turned back a spirited attempt to cancel construction of Space Station Freedom, the $30-billion, orbiting laboratory NASA plans to launch by the end of the century. It was a victory for supporters of America's manned space program. In a 254-159 vote, the House defeated an amendment offered by Rep. Tim Roemer (D-Ind.) that would have deleted virtually all of the $2.25 billion authorized for the program in the 1993 budget.
NEWS
December 23, 2001 | JOEL ACHENBACH, WASHINGTON POST
They did it again, to minimal fanfare. Out at Pad B, seven human beings recently climbed into a spaceship pointed toward the blue Florida sky. So many things had to go right. Half a million gallons of liquid hydrogen and oxygen had to burn correctly. Bolts had to blow at just the right moment. Seconds before liftoff, a quarter of a million gallons of water flooded the pad to dampen the vibrations.
NEWS
December 3, 1989 | HOWARD BENEDICT, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The manned station Freedom, an orbiting outpost of America in the icy silence of space, will take center stage in the U.S. space effort in the 1990s and be a springboard for human journeys to the moon and Mars. American scientists also expect to reap a rich harvest during the decade with an armada of sophisticated unmanned spacecraft that will explore the planets and peer back into the beginning of time.
BUSINESS
September 9, 1992 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aerospace giant Rockwell International Corp. said Tuesday that it has signed a letter of understanding with a major Russian aerospace company to cooperate on several space-related projects, including a plan to use the Soyuz spacecraft as a rescue vehicle for space station Freedom. Under the terms of the agreement, signed late Friday, Russia's NPO Energiya will provide Rockwell with all the engineering work and eventually add some hardware for a space docking system to enable the U.S.
BUSINESS
February 13, 1993 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
McDonnell Douglas Aerospace said Friday that it has awarded $23 million in contracts so far this fiscal year to small businesses as part of its work on Space Station Freedom. But the fate of those contracts, including a minority-owned company in Ohio, was uncertain after reports this week that President Clinton would drastically slash the budget for the project. Vice President Al Gore reportedly has assured two lawmakers that no money would be cut from the project.
NEWS
April 29, 1992 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congressional critics of NASA's plan to launch a $30-billion space laboratory into Earth orbit by the end of the decade will mount today the most spirited attack yet on the controversial project when the House debates a funding plan for the space agency. Led by Rep. Tim Roemer (D-Ind.), opponents of Space Station Freedom say they will try to strip from the 1993 federal budget virtually all of the $2.
BUSINESS
March 16, 1993
Rockwell International Corp.'s Rocketdyne division in Canoga Park said it has completed the design-review phase of the electrical power system it is building for the proposed Space Station Freedom. Rocketdyne, one of the prime contractors for the space station, said the review addressed all aspects of the electrical power system design and confirmed that the designs are appropriate for flight.
NEWS
October 29, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Bush signed legislation to start building Space Station Freedom, which he called "an essential step in meeting our future space objectives." About $2 billion for the space station was included in the $81-billion appropriations measure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1993
It's been too long since either Russia or the National Aeronautics and Space Administration had much to crow about. NASA is smarting from the apparent staggering failure of the Mars Observer, a string of scrubbed shuttle launches and constant congressional whittling at the budget for the proposed space station Freedom. As for Russia, its rampant inflation, political crises and surging street crime make NASA's woes look gnat-sized.
NEWS
August 18, 1993 | JAMES F. PELTZ and GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The government chose Boeing Co. on Tuesday to lead development of a scaled-back space station, bringing new uncertainty to thousands of Southern California jobs now tied to the costly and controversial project. NASA also said it chose Houston's Johnson Space Center over sites in Huntsville, Ala., and Cleveland to serve as the space station's command center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1993 | This column was reported by Times staff writers Alan C. Miller in Washington, Henry Chu and John Schwada in Los Angeles and Mark Gladstone in Sacramento
A GALAXY OF VIEWPOINTS: With the Rocketdyne division of Rockwell International in Canoga Park holding contracts worth $2.4 billion, the recent votes over the fate of the costly and controversial Space Station Freedom were particularly tough for Valley-area Democrats. Rep. Howard L. Berman (D-Panorama City) voted last month to support building a scaled-back, $25.5-billion orbiting space laboratory. Reps. Anthony C. Beilenson (D-Woodland Hills) and Henry A.
NEWS
July 8, 1993
By a margin of one vote, the House rejected an amendment to terminate the space station Freedom by eliminating its funding from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration budget (HR 2200). The bill authorizes $12.7 billion over the next seven years for the project, which is designed to yield scientific breakthroughs and energize the U.S. space program. About $9 billion already has been appropriated toward putting Freedom aloft by the end of the century.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1993 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With hundreds of jobs and billions of dollars in contracts at stake, Rocketdyne officials rolled out the red carpet for a U. S. congressman Tuesday at production facilities for the Space Station Freedom. "We need to do everything we can to hold on to jobs . . . this particular space station is one way to do that," said Rep. Howard P. (Buck) McKeon (R-Santa Clarita), following a two-hour tour of Rocketdyne, which has been contracted to build the space station's electrical power system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1993
By a margin of one vote, the House rejected an amendment to terminate the space station Freedom by eliminating its funding from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration budget (HR 2200). The bill authorizes $12.7 billion over the next seven years for the project, which is designed to yield scientific breakthroughs and energize the U.S. space program. About $9 billion already has been appropriated toward putting Freedom aloft by the end of the century.
BUSINESS
June 19, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Japan Space Agency Plans Shuttle: It plans to start developing an unmanned shuttle craft next year that will ferry supplies to and from the U.S.-led space station Freedom early in the next century, the National Space Development Agency of Japan announced. It will submit its proposals Thursday to the Science and Technology Agency, the first of several steps toward obtaining the several billion dollars needed before the craft flies.
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