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BUSINESS
March 1, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
After a successful launch of its Falcon 9 rocket, SpaceX has ran into a thruster issue with its Dragon cargo-carrying capsule as it orbits the Earth in a mission to resupply the International Space Station for NASA. The Dragon spacecraft has four thruster pods, which work to control the spacecraft as it makes its way to the space station. Following the 7:10 a.m. PST blastoff, only one of the thrusters was working. In an afternoon conference call, SpaceX Chief Executive Elon Musk said that a second pod was functioning and that he expected the two others to come online later.
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BUSINESS
March 1, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
Hawthorne-based SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket is on the launch pad ready to blast off at 7:10 a.m. Pacific time from Cape Canaveral, Fla., to begin a resupply mission to the International Space Station for NASA. If you want to watch the launch, check it out on NASA TV or SpaceX's webcast . Coverage begins at 5:30 a.m. NASA said the weather forecast is 80% favorable for a launch. PHOTOS: A 'new era': Private-sector space mission "We're about to launch and we're happy to be here," Mike Suffredini, NASA program manager for space station at Johnson Space Center, said at a pre-launch press conference.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
A capsule carrying cargo to the International Space Station ran into trouble shortly after its Friday morning launch from Cape Canaveral, Fla., but officials expressed confidence later in the day that the mission would go forward. On its third commercial mission to the space station under contract with NASA, Hawthorne-based Space Exploration Technologies Corp., or SpaceX, ran into a thruster issue with its Dragon capsule as it orbited around the Earth. The capsule is packed with more than 1,200 pounds of food, scientific experiments and other cargo for delivery to the six astronauts aboard the space station.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
On an overcast morning, SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket launched from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canavera l Air Force Station and sped through the clouds Friday on its way to the International Space Station. However, about 12 minutes into the NASA resupply mission, after the rocket had lifted its Dragon capsule packed with more than 1,200 pounds of cargo into orbit, there was an anomaly in the spacecraft. "It appears that although it reached Earth orbit, Dragon is experiencing some type of problem right now," John Insprucker, Falcon 9 product director, told viewers on SpaceX's live webcast.
BUSINESS
February 25, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
Hawthorne-based rocket maker SpaceX is targeting Friday as the launch date for the next NASA cargo resupply flight to the International Space Station. The company, formally known as Space Exploration Technologies Corp., performed a successful resupply mission to the space station in October and a demonstration mission back in May. SpaceX is the only commercial company to perform such a task. Blastoff of the company's Falcon 9 rocket is scheduled for 7:10 a.m. PST from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.
SCIENCE
February 19, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
In what could be called a three-hour space oddity , the International Space Station lost communication with NASA's ground control in Houston on Tuesday while the station updated its software. Its astronauts, two Americans, three Russians and a Canadian, were left sitting in a tin can far above the world, and there was nothing they could do. Luckily, the spaceship knew which way to go. Thanks to its quick, 90-minute orbit around the Earth, the crew members were able to occasionally check in with engineers on the ground as they passed over Russia and got directions on how to fix the problem.
BUSINESS
November 5, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
You get sales alerts, Twitter alerts, sports alerts and Facebook alerts. Now you can also get an alert when the International Space Station is visible overhead thanks to NASA's new Web app Spot the Station. The International Space Station's orbit 200 miles above Earth makes it visible to more than 90% of the Earth's population, NASA said. The trick is knowing when to look for it. NASA's Johnson Space Center already calculates the sighting information several times a week for more than 4,600 locations worldwide.
BUSINESS
October 30, 2012 | By David Lazarus
That's no moon -- it's a space station! Disney's more than $4-billion acquisition of Lucasfilm topped the Consumer Confidential segment on KTLA-TV today. Is this a good thing for "Star Wars" fans? Could be. Or it could be a new set of mouse ears on R2-D2. We also looked at the cost of Sandy, and how the storm prompted a surge in Netflix viewing.    
BUSINESS
October 28, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
SpaceX's Dragon space capsule survived a fiery reentry into the Earth's atmosphere and splashed down about 250 miles west of the Southern California coast Sunday, concluding NASA's first contracted cargo mission to the International Space Station. The three-week undertaking, carried out by the Hawthorne company officially known as Space Exploration Technologies Corp., was capped off at 12:22 p.m. Pacific time when the cone-shaped capsule hit the water. Shortly after, ships moved in and fished the spacecraft out. The Dragon capsule delivered 882 pounds of supplies to the space station this month and returned with 1,673 pounds of cargo that included damaged equipment, scientific experiments and hundreds of astronaut blood and urine samples to be analyzed by NASA officials.
BUSINESS
October 28, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan
After spending three weeks in outer space, SpaceX's Dragon space capsule survived a fiery reentry of the Earth's atmosphere and splashed down hundreds of miles west of Southern California. When the unmanned cone-shaped capsule hit the water at 12:22 p.m. Pacific time Sunday, it marked the end of the mission carried out by the Hawthorne company officially known as Space Exploration Technologies Corp. The spacecraft delivered 882 pounds of supplies to the space station earlier this month and returned with 1,673 pounds of cargo.
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