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Space Stations Finances

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NEWS
September 23, 1992 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
House and Senate negotiators agreed Tuesday to spend $2.1 billion next year to continue building the controversial Space Station Freedom, scheduled for launch in late 1995. Although the compromise figure is $125 million less than what was sought by the Bush Administration, officials of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration said the accord will permit work on the station to proceed on schedule.
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BUSINESS
July 28, 1994 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an acrimonious congressional hearing Wednesday, NASA officials conceded that they selected Boeing late last year as prime contractor to build the space station--a program dogged by major cost overruns since its inception--even though the firm had flunked the agency's own cost-control reviews.
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NEWS
July 16, 1994 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The investigative arm of Congress concluded in a study released Friday that McDonnell Douglas Aerospace--a major contractor for the beleaguered space station--improperly charged the government for more than $300,000 in lobbying, advertising, consulting services and other costs, some of them in violation of federal law. The study, conducted by the General Accounting Office and requested by Rep. John Conyers (D-Mich.), chairman of the House Committee on Government Operations, reviewed $3.
NEWS
July 16, 1994 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The investigative arm of Congress concluded in a study released Friday that McDonnell Douglas Aerospace--a major contractor for the beleaguered space station--improperly charged the government for more than $300,000 in lobbying, advertising, consulting services and other costs, some of them in violation of federal law. The study, conducted by the General Accounting Office and requested by Rep. John Conyers (D-Mich.), chairman of the House Committee on Government Operations, reviewed $3.
BUSINESS
July 28, 1994 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an acrimonious congressional hearing Wednesday, NASA officials conceded that they selected Boeing late last year as prime contractor to build the space station--a program dogged by major cost overruns since its inception--even though the firm had flunked the agency's own cost-control reviews.
NEWS
July 9, 1991 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Some of the largest and most prestigious scientific organizations in the country will call today for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to back away from plans to build the Space Station Freedom. The unprecedented action dramatically illustrates the deteriorating support for the costly program.
BUSINESS
July 6, 1994 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
NASA's top administrator visited McDonnell Douglas Aerospace here Tuesday for a progress report on the space station and other projects. Daniel S. Goldin, who said he was pleased by last week's resounding vote of confidence by the U.S. House of Representatives for the space station, gave a qualified thumbs up to McDonnell Douglas' efforts as a primary contractor on the project. "Douglas is coming along," he said.
BUSINESS
September 21, 1993 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
NASA's reduced budget for the troubled space station will cost Rocketdyne as much as $90 million in revenue next year, so the Canoga Park unit of Rockwell International has already started cutting about 200 jobs. Based on budget projections for the federal space agency, Rocketdyne says it expects to receive $250 million to $300 million for its work on the space station in the fiscal year that begins Oct. 1. That compares with $340 million for the current fiscal year.
BUSINESS
July 6, 1994 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
NASA's top administrator visited McDonnell Douglas Aerospace here Tuesday for a progress report on the space station and other projects. Daniel S. Goldin, who said he was pleased by last week's resounding vote of confidence by the U.S. House of Representatives for the space station, gave a qualified thumbs up to McDonnell Douglas' efforts as a primary contractor on the project. "Douglas is coming along," he said.
BUSINESS
September 21, 1993 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
NASA's reduced budget for the troubled space station will cost Rocketdyne as much as $90 million in revenue next year, so the Canoga Park unit of Rockwell International has already started cutting about 200 jobs. Based on budget projections for the federal space agency, Rocketdyne says it expects to receive $250 million to $300 million for its work on the space station in the fiscal year that begins Oct. 1. That compares with $340 million for the current fiscal year.
NEWS
September 23, 1992 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
House and Senate negotiators agreed Tuesday to spend $2.1 billion next year to continue building the controversial Space Station Freedom, scheduled for launch in late 1995. Although the compromise figure is $125 million less than what was sought by the Bush Administration, officials of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration said the accord will permit work on the station to proceed on schedule.
NEWS
July 9, 1991 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Some of the largest and most prestigious scientific organizations in the country will call today for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to back away from plans to build the Space Station Freedom. The unprecedented action dramatically illustrates the deteriorating support for the costly program.
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