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BUSINESS
August 12, 1998
NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory will work with Pasadena-based Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. to commercialize cutting-edge technologies in its latest attempt to give space technology down-to-Earth value. No specific deals were mentioned. Jacobs specializes in building industrial plants and cleaning up chemical contamination. Jacobs will look at such things as infrared imaging to detect pollutants, advanced mapping to choose plant sites, ground-penetrating radar and fuel-cell-powered generators.
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BUSINESS
March 28, 2014 | By Andrea Chang
It's long been the stuff of science fiction, the ability to wear a headset and feel as if you're in another world. Creating an affordable virtual reality device for the mass market has been the holy grail of sorts for game developers and futurists. Now Facebook's $2-billion purchase of Oculus may bring that dream one step closer to reality. Virtual reality enthusiasts say they've been waiting for decades for the technology to take off and have been developing headsets and content in the hopes they could soon have mainstream appeal.
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NEWS
December 16, 1990 | STEVEN P. ROSENFELD, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Researchers are trying to harness space-age technology for a down-to-Earth job: to help farmers spread manure and chemicals over their fields. "There's no joking about this. This is serious business," said agricultural engineer Thomas Colvin, who is conducting the studies. "This is a high-tech approach to a low-tech problem." The aim is to cut costs and reduce harm to the environment by taking the guesswork out of how much animal waste and chemicals to use and where to use them, Colvin said.
BUSINESS
December 26, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
China watched this month as the nation's first lunar rover rolled across the moon's surface. It was a moment of national pride when images of the six-wheel rover, dubbed Jade Rabbit, were transmitted live back to Earth, showing the red and gold Chinese flag on the moon for the first time. "Now as Jade Rabbit has made its touchdown on the moon surface," the state-run Xinhua news agency said, "the whole world again marvels at China's remarkable space capabilities. " The lunar triumph offered many Americans their first glimpse at an unfolding new space race involving countries with emerging economies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1987 | JOHN M. LEIGHTY, United Press International
Specialized body sensors and computers are being used at Stanford's Children's Hospital to test the muscle functions, gait, sway and energy expenditure of patients with severe motion disorders. Under the guidance of medical director and surgeon Eugene E. Bleck, who has worked with cerebral palsy victims for 40 years, the motion analysis laboratory performs high-tech tests on people with walking problems to provide objective data to orthopedic specialists.
BUSINESS
October 19, 1999 | From Associated Press
The French and German companies that are forming a European challenger to U.S. aerospace giants established a link with a British partner Monday in announcing plans to create Europe's largest space technology business. Marconi Electronic Systems in Britain plans to join with DaimlerChrysler's DASA unit and France's Aerospatiale Matra in the joint venture, to be called Astrium.
NEWS
February 19, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
The first space testing of "Star Wars" anti-missile technology could take place by 1987, two years earlier than first planned, an authoritative aerospace magazine says. Aviation Week and Space Technology quoted Lt. Gen. James Abrahamson, director of President Reagan's Strategic Defense Initiative, as saying that a new plan calls for two tests annually starting in 1987 aboard NASA's space shuttle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1987 | --Compiled from Times staff and wire service reports
Satellite images of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula, central Guatemala and Belize have shed new light on ancient Mayan civilization, such as the Mayas' settlement patterns and their use of natural resources, NASA scientists at the Ames Research Center said last week. The researchers in Mountain View, Calif., also found evidence of an ancient river plain, sea level changes and tectonic fault lines, which may have been important geographic elements in shaping Mayan civilization.
OPINION
November 1, 1987
Put five or six astronauts in the cramped surroundings of a space shuttle for a week or so, and the lack of adequate facilities for maintaining personal hygiene quickly becomes apparent. Put astronauts aboard a space station for three months or more, and the absence of bathing facilities becomes a real problem. NASA has been working hard on that problem, and now, after three years and $400,000 in development costs, it thinks that it has a solution.
BUSINESS
July 22, 2011 | By W.J. Hennigan and Ralph Vartabedian, Los Angeles Times
As NASA retreats from an ambitious human spaceflight program for the foreseeable future, foreign countries are moving ahead with their own multibillion-dollar plans to go to the moon, build space stations and even take the long voyage to Mars. Although most of the world still lags far behind the United States in space technology and engineering know-how, other nations are engaging in a new space race and building their own space research centers, rockets, satellites and lunar rovers.
SCIENCE
December 12, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Space rock, or space rocks? A new study of asteroid 4179 Toutatis suggests the large asteroid that zips past Earth every four years is actually a collection of rocky fragments held together by gravity. "We may conclude that Toutatis is not a monolith, but most likely a coalescence of shattered fragments," the researchers wrote in a paper in Scientific Reports .  The study, published Thursday, is based on images of the asteroid collected by the Chinese space probe Chang'e-2 (see above)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
NASA's extraterrestrial smartphone has phoned home. The 4-inch-square satellite, PhoneSat 2.4, which uses an off-the-shelf Samsung Nexus S phone running Google's Android operating system, transmitted data back to its Santa Clara University ground station, the space agency announced last week. As the number implies, this is not the first smartphone NASA has hurled into orbit. The first, in April, proved the concept of using commercially available electronics for satellites in low-Earth orbit.
NEWS
December 1, 2012 | By Barbara Demick and Jung-yoon Choi
BEIJING -- North Korea announced Saturday that it will send a long-range rocket into space this month, trying to make up for a public-relations disaster in April when a much-hyped launch failed. In the announcement attributed to a spokesman for the Korean Committee for Space Technology, North Korea said the rocket would carry a "polar-orbiting Earth observation satellite" for "peaceful scientific and technological" purposes. Nonetheless, the launch is seen as a defiant move for an impoverished country that is already subject to a U.S. ban from developing nuclear and missile technology.
NEWS
August 5, 2012 | By Nika Soon-Shiong
The Planetary Society's annual Planetfest logically culminates tonight in a celebration of the Mars rover Curiosity's landing . But the event is more than a viewing party; it is an interactive, family-friendly experience that seeks to bring home the prospect of space travel. It's also an opportunity for XCOR Aerospace, a private space technology company, to showcase its newest development: the Lynx Suborbital Spacecraft. The Lynx vehicle is designed to go up to space and back for a cool $95,000 a flight, allowing passengers to experience about three minutes of zero gravity.
OPINION
August 1, 2012 | PATT MORRISON
As shipments go, it was routine -- about half a ton of supplies -- except it was delivered by the first commercial flight to the International Space Station. SpaceX partnered with NASA in this new model, the brainchild of Elon Musk, who's behind Tesla electric cars as well. Musk left South Africa at 17, earned two U.S. undergraduate degrees and then made serial piles of dough pioneering online payment systems, including the one that became PayPal. Musk's persona inspired aspects of the portrayal of Tony Stark in "Iron Man," but his aspirations seem more like Buzz Lightyear's -- to infinity, and beyond.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
At a launchpad in Cape Canaveral sits a spaceship atop an 18-story rocket that NASA officials hope will be the first privately built craft to dock with the International Space Station. On Thursday, the company that manufactures the spacecraft, Space Exploration Technologies Corp., performed a successful launch readiness test for its upcoming flight - an important step on the road to the space station. The company, better known as SpaceX, posted the news on its Twitter page about fueling its Falcon 9 rocket with rocket-grade kerosene and liquid oxygen as it stood vertical at its launch complex.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
NASA's extraterrestrial smartphone has phoned home. The 4-inch-square satellite, PhoneSat 2.4, which uses an off-the-shelf Samsung Nexus S phone running Google's Android operating system, transmitted data back to its Santa Clara University ground station, the space agency announced last week. As the number implies, this is not the first smartphone NASA has hurled into orbit. The first, in April, proved the concept of using commercially available electronics for satellites in low-Earth orbit.
SCIENCE
December 12, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Space rock, or space rocks? A new study of asteroid 4179 Toutatis suggests the large asteroid that zips past Earth every four years is actually a collection of rocky fragments held together by gravity. "We may conclude that Toutatis is not a monolith, but most likely a coalescence of shattered fragments," the researchers wrote in a paper in Scientific Reports .  The study, published Thursday, is based on images of the asteroid collected by the Chinese space probe Chang'e-2 (see above)
BUSINESS
July 22, 2011 | By W.J. Hennigan and Ralph Vartabedian, Los Angeles Times
As NASA retreats from an ambitious human spaceflight program for the foreseeable future, foreign countries are moving ahead with their own multibillion-dollar plans to go to the moon, build space stations and even take the long voyage to Mars. Although most of the world still lags far behind the United States in space technology and engineering know-how, other nations are engaging in a new space race and building their own space research centers, rockets, satellites and lunar rovers.
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