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NEWS
November 27, 2012 | By Paul Whitefield
If space truly is the final frontier, does that make Elon Musk a real-life Capt. Kirk? Musk, the founder of SpaceX -- which has a $1.6-billion contract with NASA to ferry cargo to the International Space Station using its private Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon capsule -- last week laid out an even bolder vision : a colony of 80,000 people on Mars. The price of a ticket? About $500,000 a colonist. (And no, this deal doesn't include a bridge in Brooklyn. The guy's already done the math.
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SCIENCE
April 2, 2014 | By Amina Khan
As NASA plans to send astronauts to an asteroid or even to Mars in the coming decades -- missions that could last well beyond 30 days -- they're grappling with an ethical dilemma. How do they handle decisions on long-distance space exploration when it could expose astronauts to high or unknown health hazards? To help develop an ethical framework for venturing into this unknown territory, the space agency asked the Institute of Medicine to convene a panel of experts to offer some helpful guidelines.
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BUSINESS
April 7, 2012 | By Amy Martinez
SEATTLE - Amazon.com founder and Chief Executive Jeff Bezos is putting a chunk of his fortune - estimated at $18 billion - toward more out-of-the-box ventures. He created a private aerospace company called Blue Origin in 2000 with an aim to make space travel more affordable, and he's spending millions to build a clock that's supposed to last 10,000 years in the desert wilderness of West Texas. Since 2010, NASA has committed nearly $26 million for Kent, Wash.-based Blue Origin, which is competing with Boeing and two other companies to create a new generation of vehicles that can take U.S. astronauts to the international space station.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2014 | By Chris O'Brien
The purported unmasking of Satoshi Nakamoto by Newsweek on Thursday trumped any other bitcoin news. Whatever else was going on in the world of the world's favorite virtual currency pretty much got ignored. Makes sense.  But to show just how strange and crazy things can be around bitcoin these days, here are four stories we ignored because of the Nakamoto revelation:  1. Bitcoin firm CEO found dead in suspected suicide : "Autumn Ratke, a 28-year-old American CEO of  bitcoin exchange firm First Meta  was found dead in her Singapore apartment on Feb. 28. Local media are calling it a suicide, but Singapore officials are waiting for toxicology test results.
BUSINESS
May 15, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
For the last half-century, space flight has been the domain of the world's superpowers. All that is set to change as soon as Saturday when SpaceX, the private rocket company in Hawthorne, will attempt to launch a spaceship with cargo into orbit and three days later dock it with the International Space Station. If successful, the mission could mean a major shift in the way the U.S. government handles space exploration. Instead of keeping space travel a closely guarded government function, NASA has already begun hiring privately funded start-up companies for spacecraft development and is moving toward eventually outsourcing NASA space missions.
SCIENCE
April 2, 2014 | By Amina Khan
As NASA plans to send astronauts to an asteroid or even to Mars in the coming decades -- missions that could last well beyond 30 days -- they're grappling with an ethical dilemma. How do they handle decisions on long-distance space exploration when it could expose astronauts to high or unknown health hazards? To help develop an ethical framework for venturing into this unknown territory, the space agency asked the Institute of Medicine to convene a panel of experts to offer some helpful guidelines.
SCIENCE
August 6, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
What will it take to build a spaceship capable of traveling to the stars? And what if you wanted it to be ready to launch in just 100 years? It may sound like the premise of a science fiction show or reality TV series. But these are serious questions being asked by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the research-and-development arm of the U.S. military. This fall, DARPA intends to award up to $500,000 in seed money to a group that proves it would do the best job of developing the necessary technologies — whatever they may be — for interstellar travel.
NEWS
August 14, 1986 | BETTYANN KEVLES
"Scenario: A crewperson is found dead on the first morning on Mars. Died during sleep. Obviously an asymptomatic cardiac arrest, or previously undetected Martian virus, or suicide by poisoning, or clandestine homicide. How do we know?" The beginning of a science fiction novel? Rather it is the introduction to a selection by Robert M. Beattie Jr. in "The Case for Mars II, Volume 62" in a series published by the American Astronautical Society in 1985.
NEWS
January 21, 1988 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Yuri Romanenko, the Soviet cosmonaut who set an endurance record by staying in outer space for 326 days, said Wednesday that he sees no limit to how long human beings can stay in space. In fact, Romanenko said, he jokingly had told his wife that he would ask that his flight be extended unless the redecoration of their apartment was completed before his return to Earth on Dec. 29.
NEWS
October 8, 1987 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
When former U.S. astronaut Owen Garriott was given the rare opportunity to converse with an orbiting Soviet cosmonaut during a recent visit to the Soviet Union's space center, he knew just what to ask Yuri Romanenko, who had just set a record for space endurance. Garriott, who holds the U.S. space flight endurance record with nearly two months aboard Skylab more than a decade ago, chose a topic both of them know something about.
BUSINESS
November 26, 2013 | By Shan Li
Virgin Galactic, the company aimed at taking tourists to space, is accepting the digital currency bitcoin as payment for future space travel. Richard Branson, the British billionaire who founded the futuristic company, called bitcoin "a brilliantly conceived idea" that has "really captured the imagination recently. " "All of our future astronauts are pioneers in their own right," Branson wrote in a blog post titled "Bitcoins in space. " "This is one more way to be forward-looking.
HEALTH
November 2, 2013 | By James S. Fell
Col. Chris Hadfield, who until recently was commander of the International Space Station, has a workout regimen that is out of this world. Sorry. Couldn't resist. Hadfield's new book, "An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth," goes into detail about what it takes to be in shape for space travel. What kind of shape do you need to be in to qualify for the space program? To qualify to live on the space station, you have to pass the hardest physical exam in the world. There has to be a high lack of a probability of a problem, whether it's your appendix or an injury.
TRAVEL
October 6, 2013 | By Jane Engle
HUNTSVILLE, Ala. - I was inept at moonwalking. My rocket was a dud. And I crashed the space shuttle. Fortunately, I was just an astronaut wannabe and not the real deal. But it's as close as this middle-aged space geek is going to get. That geekiness, inspired by IMAX documentaries on space and news coverage of NASA's final shuttle launch in 2011, was what brought me to Adult Space Academy. The trip was a gift from my wife. The three-day program is among more than a dozen versions of Space Camp, which the U.S. Space & Rocket Center in Huntsville created more than 30 years ago to give visitors a taste of what it's like to train as an astronaut.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2013 | By Scott Collins
NBC is hoping to get a space-travel reality show off the ground this time.  The network is teaming up with producer Mark Burnett and billionaire Richard Branson to make "Space Race," a competition series that would send the winner up in SpaceShipTwo, a commercial space-travel service from Branson's Virgin Galactic. The series could offer Virgin a key opportunity to plug its services.  FULL COVERAGE: Fall TV preview 2013 "Virgin Galactic's mission is to democratize space, eventually making commercial space travel affordable and accessible to all," Branson wrote in a statement.
SCIENCE
September 4, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
A lemur that hibernates is strange and cute enough. But studying its lethargic state may provide a clue to sending humans on long-distance space travel or healing the ravages of heart attacks, stroke and head trauma, according to researchers at Duke University. The western fat-tailed dwarf lemur, a pocket-sized nocturnal primate native to Madagascar, is the closest genetic cousin of humans to hibernate for long periods, a discovery made by a German research team in 2004. The revelation that primates hibernated led to a happy coincidence at Duke, which happens to have a lemur center and a sleep laboratory.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2013 | By Joe Flint
A new distribution platform is emerging and no one knows what to make of it. The established players are wary of it and see it as more foe than friend. Others are afraid of losing their shirt by investing in it. Sound familiar? But this isn't the Internet. This was cable television in the early 1980s. Back then there were only a handful of networks and few were talking about 500 channels full of original content. "It was an unproven business, investors were not convinced that cable programming was a good investment," said John Hendricks, founder of Discovery Communications.
NEWS
May 17, 1987 | JAN ZIEGLER, United Press International
"Beam me up, Scotty." The modern-day science fiction cliche, used to rescue many a main character from danger on alien worlds, came about during the voyages of the starship Enterprise in the popular television and movie series "Star Trek." But will it ever be possible in reality to travel from place to place by having your molecules rearranged on a beam of light and reassembled on arrival?
BUSINESS
May 10, 1995 | LEE DYE
Facing dangerous unknowns, Christopher Columbus crossed the ocean blue to discover a world unknown to Europeans. A number of readers have suggested that if old Chris had agreed with my column of March 1, he would never have tried. Despite the fact that exploration of the universe is considered part of our "human destiny," I doubt that humans will ever travel beyond our solar system, and I so stated in the column.
NEWS
May 2, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Virgin Galactic has trained more than 140 "space agents" worldwide to sell tickets for the first commercial space flights that may begin as soon as early next year. "We have two clients signed up," Bell deSouza of Mansour Travel in Beverly Hills said Wednesday. The agency is one of eight in California authorized to sell the $200,000 ticket to ride. Monday's successful test flight of Virgin Galactic 's SpaceShipTwo in Mojave brought the idea of commercial space travel a bit closer to reality.
SCIENCE
April 16, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Aspiring astronauts and wannabe reality TV stars, take note: A nonprofit that aims to send the first human colonists to Mars by 2023 will start taking applications in July of this year. Mars One, the Netherlands-based organization that wants to turn the colonizing of Mars into a global reality television phenomenon, is encouraging anyone who is interested in space travel to apply. Previous training in space travel is not required, nor is a science degree of any sort, but applicants do need to be at least 18 years of age and willing to leave Earth forever.
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