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April 8, 1987 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
When 38-year-old computer scientist David Sands' car crashed into a derelict restaurant not long ago in the south of England, the police reported his death as a routine traffic fatality. Others are skeptical. For Sands was the third scientist working for the defense contractor Marconi Ltd. to die in violent, mysterious circumstances in the last six months. All three were involved in sensitive, defense-related projects; all were apparent suicides, and there were no witnesses to any of the deaths.
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OPINION
January 24, 2007
SPACE WARFARE may be a staple of science fiction, but almost no one in the real world thinks it's a good idea. That's why China's destruction this month of a moribund weather satellite is so alarming: It was the first time in more than 20 years that a ground-fired missile was used against a satellite. Yet a ban on all weapons in space that could be enforced, while desirable, may be as utopian as some science fiction scenarios. Official U.S.
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OPINION
January 24, 2007
SPACE WARFARE may be a staple of science fiction, but almost no one in the real world thinks it's a good idea. That's why China's destruction this month of a moribund weather satellite is so alarming: It was the first time in more than 20 years that a ground-fired missile was used against a satellite. Yet a ban on all weapons in space that could be enforced, while desirable, may be as utopian as some science fiction scenarios. Official U.S.
NEWS
July 26, 2001 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After talks with a top Russian official in Moscow, National Security Advisor Condoleezza Rice was upbeat Wednesday about the chances of a U.S. agreement with Russia on the Bush administration's plans for a missile shield. With the U.S. and Russia poised for talks that could shape a new post-Cold War security framework, Rice expressed America's eagerness to press ahead and jettison the 1972 Antiballistic Missile Treaty, which bans deployment of a national missile shield.
NEWS
September 28, 1989 | SARA FRITZ and JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writers
A surprise Senate vote to limit funding for the "Star Wars" missile defense program reflects a dramatic erosion of political support that may rule out U.S. deployment of anything other than a rudimentary, ground-based system in the foreseeable future, members of Congress and defense experts said Wednesday.
NEWS
February 10, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The estimated costs of building and deploying Phase I of the "Star Wars" missile-defense system have been reduced 20% to $55 billion, the Pentagon announced. The lower projection was based on "technical progress and an evolving architecture for the space-based portion" of the system, the office for the Strategic Defense Initiative said.
NEWS
February 9, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As both sides offered new ideas to speed arms control talks, the Soviet Union appeared Thursday to remove one of the last major obstacles to a U.S.-Soviet strategic nuclear arms reduction treaty by eliminating linkage between the treaty and the U.S. "Star Wars" program. Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze told visiting Secretary of State James A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1991 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
One legacy of the Persian Gulf war almost certainly will be a greater use of space for military purposes, including relatively simple systems that could blow the next Saddam Hussein out of his bunker and radar satellites that would keep track of everything that moves throughout a war zone.
NEWS
April 24, 1988
President Reagan's proposed "Star Wars" missile defense system likely would "suffer a catastrophic failure" the first time it was used to protect the United States against a Soviet nuclear attack, the congressional Office of Technology Assessment concluded after a study of almost two years.
NEWS
April 21, 1991 | From United Press International
The countdown began Saturday for the shuttle Discovery's scheduled launch Tuesday on a "Star Wars" research flight, a liftoff that would come just 12 days after the shuttle Atlantis returned to Earth but more than a month behind schedule because of worrisome hinge cracks. Discovery's countdown began on time for a launch attempt at 4:05 a.m. PDT Tuesday, with forecasters predicting a 70% chance of stormy weather that could delay blastoff.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1991 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
One legacy of the Persian Gulf war almost certainly will be a greater use of space for military purposes, including relatively simple systems that could blow the next Saddam Hussein out of his bunker and radar satellites that would keep track of everything that moves throughout a war zone.
NEWS
May 24, 1990 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
A nuclear weapons scientist who publicly questioned the feasibility of a key part of the Star Wars program is leaving Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, where he once did battle with one of the legendary names in nuclear physics, Edward Teller. Roy Woodruff, 49, former director of Livermore's nuclear weapons program, announced Wednesday that he is moving to the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, where he will become a senior adviser in the arms control and verification program.
NEWS
February 15, 1990 | From Associated Press
Two satellites rocketed into space Wednesday on what the Air Force said was the most ambitious "Star Wars" experiment yet, testing a plan to destroy hostile missiles by bouncing laser beams off orbiting mirrors. One satellite carried a mirror designed to reflect lasers fired from a Hawaiian mountaintop back to a ground target to test the accuracy of such a system.
NEWS
February 10, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The estimated costs of building and deploying Phase I of the "Star Wars" missile-defense system have been reduced 20% to $55 billion, the Pentagon announced. The lower projection was based on "technical progress and an evolving architecture for the space-based portion" of the system, the office for the Strategic Defense Initiative said.
NEWS
February 9, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As both sides offered new ideas to speed arms control talks, the Soviet Union appeared Thursday to remove one of the last major obstacles to a U.S.-Soviet strategic nuclear arms reduction treaty by eliminating linkage between the treaty and the U.S. "Star Wars" program. Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze told visiting Secretary of State James A.
NEWS
January 31, 1988
A rocket carrying 15 payloads, including four small rockets that will simulate Soviet warhead boosters, will be launched this week in a major test for the "Star Wars" defense system at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, it was reported. The Delta rocket tests are among a number being conducted to enable Strategic Defense Initiative officials to determine if a space-based missile defense system is feasible. A decision is not expected until the mid-1990s.
NEWS
January 27, 1990 | From Associated Press
A key step in "Star Wars" technology was undertaken Friday in the first test of a weapon designed to demolish nuclear warheads, officials said. The Army tested its High Endoatmospheric Defense Interceptor, which is designed to stop nuclear warheads with a head-on collision before they reach ground targets. But the kill vehicle, that portion of the weapon designed to intercept, detonated before separating from the booster.
NEWS
October 12, 1989 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moscow, in a new effort to curb the U.S. anti-missile program known as "Star Wars," has privately offered to eliminate entirely its own existing anti-missile system around Moscow, according to Bush Administration and congressional sources. The Soviet Union would eliminate the anti-missile weapons it now has deployed around its capital if the Administration would commit itself to a narrow interpretation of the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty, Soviet diplomats have suggested.
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