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NEWS
May 7, 1985 | United Press International
The State Department on Monday accused Soviet Defense Minister Sergei L. Sokolov of making a false statement when he said the Soviets are not doing research on space weapons. "This is untrue and forms part of a continuing, self-serving Soviet propaganda campaign," said department spokesman Edward P. Djerejian, responding to an interview with Sokolov published Sunday by the official Soviet news agency Tass.
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NEWS
August 24, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush said Thursday that Washington will withdraw from the 1972 Antiballistic Missile Treaty with Moscow "at a time convenient to America" so the United States can proceed unhampered with the research and development of a missile defense system. Bush's declaration seems likely to increase tensions with Russia and surely enhances his growing reputation as the practitioner of a unilateralist foreign policy.
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NEWS
December 17, 1986 | From Reuters
Sen. Gary Hart (D-Colo.), taking a break from talks with Kremlin leaders, told the Soviets on Tuesday that Americans are concerned about all space weapons research, not just "Star Wars." In an interview on the main television news program after meetings with Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev and Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze, Hart was asked what he thought of President Reagan's "Star Wars" program, known formally as the Strategic Defense Initiative.
NEWS
July 26, 2001 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After talks with a top Russian official in Moscow, National Security Advisor Condoleezza Rice was upbeat Wednesday about the chances of a U.S. agreement with Russia on the Bush administration's plans for a missile shield. With the U.S. and Russia poised for talks that could shape a new post-Cold War security framework, Rice expressed America's eagerness to press ahead and jettison the 1972 Antiballistic Missile Treaty, which bans deployment of a national missile shield.
NEWS
April 3, 1985
U.S. and Soviet negotiators dealing with space weapons held a two-hour session in Geneva, their second since the arms talks were divided into three working groups. Chief U.S. negotiator Max M. Kampelman met with Soviet Ambassador Yuli A. Kvitsinsky at the U.S. Mission. No substantive details were made public. Kampelman later met with John Tower, U.S. negotiator for strategic nuclear arms, and Maynard W. Glitman, the negotiator for medium-range weapons.
NEWS
September 12, 1985 | Associated Press
A federal judge today refused to block Friday's scheduled first test of an anti-satellite weapon's ability to knock out a target in space. After 30 minutes of oral arguments, U.S. District Judge Norma Holloway Johnson denied a request by four House Democrats and the Union of Concerned Scientists for a temporary restraining order to halt the test.
NEWS
October 13, 1985 | MICHAEL WINES, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan demanded Saturday that the Soviet Union disclose details of its own "Star Wars" defense plans, saying the United States believes Moscow's weapons research is so intensive "that they may be able to put an advanced technology defensive system in space by the end of the century." The demand, which Reagan issued in his weekly radio address, appeared to be another salvo in the public relations battle raging between the President and Soviet leader Mikhail S.
NEWS
March 10, 1985 | Associated Press
President Reagan on Friday sent his negotiators into arms talks with the Soviet Union with instructions to cut back offensive weapons "so all God's children can grow up without the fear of nuclear war." Reagan steered clear of any reference to his controversial Strategic Defense Initiative. The Soviets have targeted the $26 billion research program on space-based missile defense systems for elimination at the talks opening Tuesday in Geneva, Switzerland.
NEWS
October 13, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defense Secretary Dick Cheney, in a spirited defense of the proposed "Star Wars" missile defense system, said Thursday he will urge President Bush to veto the 1990 defense appropriations bill if it provides "inadequate funding" for the program. Cheney's comments came as House and Senate lawmakers entered their fifth week of negotiations on the military funding measure. Differences between the two chambers on "Star Wars" funding have been one of the most divisive issues in the conference.
NEWS
September 23, 1986
Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze, responding to President Reagan's U.N. address, today categorically rejected Reagan's proposal to trade concessions on his "Star Wars" missile defense plan for deep cuts in U.S. and Soviet offensive arsenals. At the same time, Shevardnadze urged the United States to "stop playing for insane stakes" and to halt its "deadly nuclear gambling."
NEWS
July 24, 2001 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush pressured Moscow on Monday to agree to reduce nuclear weapons and rethink its opposition to a U.S. missile shield, but said he is prepared to develop a missile defense without Russian accord. One day after Russian President Vladimir V. Putin, with Bush at his side after two hours of meetings, disclosed that the United States and Russia would negotiate offensive and defensive weapons in tandem, Bush displayed an impatience to get moving.
NEWS
May 7, 1992 | From Associated Press
The director of the Strategic Defense Initiative said Wednesday he is scaling back spending on space-based weapons in response to accusations that he was defying Congress. Henry Cooper said SDI funding will be used instead to develop a $27-billion ground-based defensive system to be deployed by 1997. The government has already invested about $25 billion in SDI.
NEWS
June 23, 1991 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
For the first time, the Department of Defense on Saturday allowed news media to view the gigantic Alpha chemical laser that represents the second line of the nation's "Star Wars" defense against ballistic missile attack. The public unveiling of the TRW facility here follows two tests indicating that the laser can produce more than a megawatt (1 million watts) of power, enough to destroy enemy missiles while they are in the first stages of their launch.
BUSINESS
June 22, 1991 | From Associated Press
The Pentagon said Friday that its Star Wars researchers produced a chemical laser beam with enough power to confirm that such a laser could destroy a missile in space. The Strategic Defense Initiative Organization, which runs the SDI program in the Pentagon, called the test a major success for the Alpha chemical laser project. The Alpha laser, built for the Pentagon by TRW Inc.
BUSINESS
May 25, 1991 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
TRW Space & Technology Group was awarded a $340.5-million contract Friday to design the "Brilliant Pebbles" program, a space-based interceptor that is a key feature of the Strategic Defense Initiative. The Redondo Beach group, a part of Cleveland-based TRW Inc., said the 50-month "Star Wars" project to design Brilliant Pebbles will employ more than 300 people, primarily in Southern California. Martin Marietta Corp.
NEWS
May 3, 1991 | From Associated Press
Discovery's astronauts aimed a "Star Wars" research satellite at rocket fuel spewed in space Thursday, then snagged the craft and tucked it back into the shuttle's cargo bay. The seven astronauts quickly closed in on the satellite after the fuel observation. Minutes later, they used the ship's 50-foot mechanical arm to grab the probe. "We've got it!" shuttle commander Michael Coats shouted.
NEWS
March 24, 1988 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
U.S. officials, assessing the prospects for curbing strategic arms agreements, expressed increasing confidence Wednesday that President Reagan's controversial Strategic Defense Initiative will not be an obstacle to a major agreement aimed at cutting long-range offensive weapons in half. As the latest high-level U.S.-Soviet talks ended, Secretary of State George P.
NEWS
April 28, 1991 | From United Press International
With good weather expected, the shuttle Discovery and its seven-member crew were cleared Saturday for liftoff early today on a delayed "Star Wars" research mission now running two months behind schedule. Four days after a faulty fuel pump sensor scuttled a launch try, engineers at launch pad 39A planned to pump a half-million gallons of supercool liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen rocket fuel back into Discovery's external tank late Saturday for a planned liftoff at 4:01 a.m. PDT today.
NEWS
April 3, 1991 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Pentagon is secretly developing a rocket powered by a nuclear reactor and capable of lifting huge weapons and other military payloads into space, a private science foundation said Tuesday. The advanced nuclear propulsion program, code-named "Timberwind," has been funded by the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization for several years, according to the Federation of American Scientists, which is based in Washington.
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