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WORLD
May 28, 2009
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SCIENCE
December 19, 2012 | By Amina Khan
NASA's human spaceflight program is “alive and well,” NASA chief Charles Bolden told a committee convened to explore the space program's future goals and direction. “Those who question whether we can still lead in space fail to understand that a nation which has achieved so many firsts never follows and never will,” Bolden told the National Research Council committee during a daylong meeting in Washington meant to help gather evidence to review the human spaceflight program.  Bolden's remarks to the committee come soon after the decommissioning of the iconic space shuttle program, leaving the U.S. without its own space-worthy vehicles to take astronauts to low-Earth orbit.
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NEWS
May 26, 1985
"Spaceflight" is a welcome relief after "Space." Finally, my questions will be answered. The who, what, when, etc.--not who sleeps with whom. C.A. Claflin, Oxnard
OPINION
October 16, 2012
Re "Shuttle crawls obstacle course," Oct. 14 Thank you for your coverage of the space shuttle Endeavour's final journey. The photos were inspiring, and you can see that the shuttle is a bit scarred from its travels but handsome just the same. She deserves the attention after her service to our country. Thanks to Los Angeles for providing a home for this veteran. Christine Chamness Appleton, Wis. I was among the thousands who attended the Endeavour ceremony at the Forum in Inglewood, and was at the corner of Crenshaw and Martin Luther King Jr. boulevards to witness this historic mission.
SCIENCE
March 20, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A company that has sent paying tourists to the international space station said Tuesday it was scouting locations for a spaceport to send travelers on suborbital flights. Sites in Australia, the Bahamas, Florida, Japan, Malaysia, Nevada, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Singapore and Dubai in the United Arab Emirates are under consideration, the Arlington, Va.-based firm Space Adventures said in a statement.
OPINION
July 8, 2004
Re "NASA Needs a New Mission," editorial, July 3: Once again, your editorials are emphasizing the Luddite approach to spaceflight. You forget that NASA is structuring a program that will find the balance between human and robotic space exploration. The incentive of prizes to encourage [privately funded spaceflight] ought to be encouraged. In aviation's early days such prizes were given by newspapers, wealthy individuals and aeronautics clubs. NASA should encourage similar efforts today by the contemporaries of those organizations and concentrate on returning the space shuttle to flight as soon as it is safe to do so. The International Space Station should be finished, and the experience in long-term spaceflight gained from the ISS will serve NASA and international partners well in the next human spaceflight endeavor: the return to the moon and a human landing on Mars.
OPINION
October 16, 2012
Re "Shuttle crawls obstacle course," Oct. 14 Thank you for your coverage of the space shuttle Endeavour's final journey. The photos were inspiring, and you can see that the shuttle is a bit scarred from its travels but handsome just the same. She deserves the attention after her service to our country. Thanks to Los Angeles for providing a home for this veteran. Christine Chamness Appleton, Wis. I was among the thousands who attended the Endeavour ceremony at the Forum in Inglewood, and was at the corner of Crenshaw and Martin Luther King Jr. boulevards to witness this historic mission.
NEWS
October 1, 1999 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
NASA lost its $125-million Mars Climate Orbiter because spacecraft engineers failed to convert from English to metric measurements when exchanging vital data before the craft was launched, space agency officials said Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1987
The final episode of public television's four-part "Spaceflight" series will be updated with references to the 1986 space shuttle disaster for its repeat telecast June 10 on KCET Channel 28. The series, a history of manned spaceflight, currently is running Wednesdays at 9 p.m. on Channel 28. First broadcast in 1985, it was produced by Blaine Baggett, who now works as director of national public-affairs programming at KCET.
SCIENCE
October 22, 2006 | John Johnson Jr., Times Staff Writer
John Carmack, legendary designer of the "Doom" and "Quake" computer game series, is head of Armadillo Aerospace of Mesquite, Texas. He is part of a new breed of space entrepreneurs trying to transform the dream of commercial spaceflight into a reality. Carmack, 36, took time to talk last week at the NASA-backed X Prize Cup Lunar Lander Challenges at Las Cruces International Airport in New Mexico. He has built two experimental moon landers, named Pixel and Texel. The X Prize is a series of space technology competitions.
SCIENCE
June 23, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
NASA led the way for Americans in space, but now the U.S. space agency is actively encouraging companies to take over primary responsibility for getting in and out of Earth's orbit. Last month, a capsule built and operated by SpaceX completed a nine-day cargo-hauling mission to the International Space Station, becoming the first private-sector spacecraft to make such a journey. But it won't be the last. Ed Mango, manager of NASA's Commercial Crew Program, is charged with helping companies develop vehicles that could ferry astronauts - and eventually, perhaps, civilians - on routine trips to space.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan
In a pivotal moment for private spaceflight, a towering white rocket lifted a cone-shaped capsule into space early Tuesday on a mission to the International Space Station. SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket carried the unmanned Dragon capsule into space after a 3:44 a.m. EDT launch from Cape Canaveral, Fla., marking the first time a private company has sent a spacecraft to the space station. The mission is considered the first test of NASA's plan to outsource space missions to privately funded companies now that its fleet of space shuttles is retired.
BUSINESS
October 26, 2011 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
After combing through a long list of astronauts, fighter pilots, and space geeks, British billionaire Richard Branson named a new astronaut pilot to join his start-up space venture that aims to lift paying passengers into space. Branson's company Virgin Galactic announced Wednesday that former U.S. Air Force test pilot Keith Colmer will join chief pilot David Mackay to begin flight training and testing of the company's revolutionary aircraft, WhiteKnightTwo and SpaceShipTwo. Colmer was selected from more than 500 applicants, which included about 10 current and former astronauts, Virgin Galactic Chief Executive George T. Whitesides said in a recent interview at the company's office in Pasadena.
NATIONAL
July 19, 2011 | By Ralph Vartabedian and W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
When the orbiter Atlantis lands at Kennedy Space Center on Thursday, ending the 30-year-old space shuttle program, NASA will have its sights set on the next big exploration mission: sending astronauts to an asteroid in about 15 years. But the path to that goal remains poorly defined, jeopardized by a bleak budget outlook and a weak political consensus. It has left a deep angst that U.S. leadership in space flight is in rapid decline and the very ability to fly humans off the Earth is at risk.
WORLD
May 28, 2009
NATIONAL
May 24, 2009 | John Johnson Jr.
President Obama's selection Saturday of former astronaut Charles F. Bolden Jr. to head NASA gives a boost to the agency's manned space program and its stated goal of returning humans to the moon by 2020. During the presidential campaign, Obama had seemed lukewarm toward NASA and its hugely expensive human spaceflight program. Space enthusiasts were particularly worried after Obama staffers floated the idea of taking money from the agency to fund domestic programs.
SCIENCE
May 9, 2009 | John Johnson Jr.
As NASA prepares to return to the moon, the head of a panel asked by President Obama to review the space agency's future said Friday that he planned to call upon the expertise of astronauts and engineers in determining whether NASA is on the right track. "We're going to take a fresh look and go where the facts are," said Norman Augustine, who will head up the 10-member panel. Augustine, the former chief executive of one of NASA's biggest contractors, Lockheed Martin Corp.
SCIENCE
May 9, 2009 | John Johnson Jr.
As NASA prepares to return to the moon, the head of a panel asked by President Obama to review the space agency's future said Friday that he planned to call upon the expertise of astronauts and engineers in determining whether NASA is on the right track. "We're going to take a fresh look and go where the facts are," said Norman Augustine, who will head up the 10-member panel. Augustine, the former chief executive of one of NASA's biggest contractors, Lockheed Martin Corp.
WORLD
April 10, 2009 | Megan K. Stack
Designed by Soviet secret-keepers in the depths of the Cold War, Star City lies deep in the pine and birch forests on Moscow's edge, and even now you can't find it on many maps. The men at the gates and checkpoints ask for your documents, and when you get inside the legendary cosmonaut training center, you expect to find something splendid -- a glimmer of the cosmos, a flash of eternal striving.
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