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NEWS
October 28, 1985 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
When the space shuttle Challenger lifts off from Florida this week, it will inaugurate the first manned mission controlled by a country other than the United States or the Soviet Union. The Challenger, set to blast off from the Kennedy Space Center at noon Wednesday, will carry three European scientists on the fourth flight of Spacelab, a research facility that fits into the cargo bay of the shuttle. It was built by the European Space Agency and donated to the U.S.
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BUSINESS
January 12, 2001 | MARC BALLON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cardiac Science Inc. said Thursday it has withdrawn its bid to acquire Spacelabs Medical Inc., citing a lack of interest from the Redmond, Wash.-based maker of patient-monitoring devices and clinical information systems. The Irvine manufacturer of external defibrillators also withdrew a slate of six alternative directors that it had nominated for Spacelabs' board. Cardiac also is evaluating its holdings in Spacelabs--384,925 shares, a 4% stake.
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NEWS
May 5, 1985 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, Times Staff Writer
The seven crew members of the space shuttle Challenger, exultant Saturday after another day of scientific breakthroughs, are performing experiments and living in an environment that will teach scientists how to build the space stations of tomorrow. "We look at Spacelab as being the springboard for a space station," said mission manager Joseph Cremin at Johnson Space Center here. "The things we are doing now are prototypes of how we will act in a space station."
BUSINESS
November 29, 2000 | Dow Jones
Cardiac Science Inc., stepping up its effort to acquire Spacelabs Medical Inc., said Tuesday that it purchased 320,200 shares, or 3.4%, of Spacelabs stock and nominated six candidates to the company's board. A day earlier, Irvine-based Cardiac Science said it had offered $15 a share for Spacelabs, a Redmond, Wash., maker of patient-monitoring devices. Spacelabs said it had no comment regarding the offer.
NEWS
April 29, 1985 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, Times Staff Writer
Don Lind has waited 19 years for this moment. If all goes as planned, this 54-year-old nuclear physicist with the slight paunch and the professorial look will take his seat directly behind space shuttle pilot Frederick D. Gregory today and claim his small spot in history. Lind, who was named an astronaut in 1966, will serve as a mission specialist in the seven-man crew of the Spacelab shuttle Challenger, scheduled for liftoff at 9 a.m. PDT.
NEWS
August 9, 1992 | Associated Press
The next space shuttle flight will break with tradition, not to mention NASA policy, when astronauts Mark Lee and Jan Davis will become the first married couple in space. The two were married a year and a half ago, months after they were assigned to the flight. Lee, 39, and Davis, 38, certainly won't see that much of one another during the laboratory research mission, scheduled for mid-September. They will be working different shifts.
NEWS
January 20, 1992 | From Associated Press
NASA began the countdown Sunday for the first shuttle flight of the year, a laboratory research mission by Discovery that will examine the effects of weightlessness on people, plants and bugs. "This should be a great mission for science," Ronald Grabe, the mission commander, said as he and the flight's six other astronauts arrived here.
NEWS
September 15, 1992 | Associated Press
The space shuttle Endeavour's astronauts kept tabs Monday on two fish with electrodes attached to their brains and learned they had scored a space first--fertilizing eggs produced by frogs in orbit. "It's the first time we've had ovulation (in space) in a higher species, in this case the amphibian," said principal investigator Ken Souza of NASA's Ames Research Center in Mountain View, Calif. "We've also had fertilization. . . .
NEWS
May 19, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Countdown clocks began ticking Saturday for the space shuttle Columbia's scheduled blastoff Wednesday on an unprecedented medical research flight featuring seven astronauts, 30 doomed rats and 2,700 tiny jellyfish. Columbia's four-man, three-woman crew is scheduled to take off at 5 a.m. PDT Wednesday to kick off a planned nine-day Spacelab mission to find out how weightlessness affects human physiology, research considered crucial for future long-duration flights to Mars.
NEWS
July 12, 1985 | ROBERT A. JONES, Times Staff Writer
The space shuttle Challenger is scheduled to lift off today on a scientific mission that will explore the nature of the sun and the Earth's ionosphere, the crucial layer of atmosphere that shields this planet from the sun's radiation. If the countdown continues until launch time without serious problems, the Challenger will roar away from the pad at 1:30 p.m PDT packing $72 million of astronomical equipment. Weather forecasters predicted a 40% chance of rain for the liftoff.
BUSINESS
November 28, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
Cardiac Science Inc. is offering to acquire Spacelabs Medical Inc., a maker of patient-monitoring devices and clinical information systems, for $143 million. Cardiac, which makes heart defibrillators, said Monday it would pay $15 a share, up 13% from the stock's closing price Friday. The bid is 45% above Spacelabs' share price on Nov. 13, when Cardiac Science in Irvine first offered to buy the Redmond, Wash., company.
BUSINESS
June 5, 1995 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chalk up another win for Seattle--and one more loss for the Southland. SpaceLabs Medical, which has manufactured medical instruments in the San Fernando Valley for more than 30 years, is moving most of its operations and about 350 jobs to Washington state. Although headquartered in Redmond, Wash., SpaceLabs, a maker of vital-sign monitors used in hospitals, has for years employed about 500 people in its manufacturing, repair and assembly divisions in Chatsworth.
BUSINESS
April 25, 1995 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chalk up anotherwin for Seattle--and one more loss for L.A. SpaceLabs Medical, which has manufactured medical instruments in the San Fernando Valley for more than 30 years, is moving most of its operations and about 350 jobs to Washington state. Although headquartered in Redmond, Wash., SpaceLabs, a maker of vital-sign monitors used in hospitals, has for years employed about 500 people in its manufacturing, repair and assembly divisions in Chatsworth.
NEWS
October 10, 1993
Karl G. Henize, 66, a senior NASA scientist and former astronaut, who was on leave from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to participate in a Mt. Everest climbing expedition. About halfway into the British expedition's first day of climbing, Henize experienced respiratory problems, said Jeff Carr, a NASA spokesman. He was buried on 29,028-foot Mt. Everest, the highest known mountain in the world, at the base camp.
NEWS
September 15, 1992 | Associated Press
The space shuttle Endeavour's astronauts kept tabs Monday on two fish with electrodes attached to their brains and learned they had scored a space first--fertilizing eggs produced by frogs in orbit. "It's the first time we've had ovulation (in space) in a higher species, in this case the amphibian," said principal investigator Ken Souza of NASA's Ames Research Center in Mountain View, Calif. "We've also had fertilization. . . .
NEWS
August 9, 1992 | Associated Press
The next space shuttle flight will break with tradition, not to mention NASA policy, when astronauts Mark Lee and Jan Davis will become the first married couple in space. The two were married a year and a half ago, months after they were assigned to the flight. Lee, 39, and Davis, 38, certainly won't see that much of one another during the laboratory research mission, scheduled for mid-September. They will be working different shifts.
NEWS
April 6, 1987 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet Union reported Sunday that it was unable to dock its first space laboratory with its orbiting Mir station because of a failure in the lab's control system. The laboratory module, called Kvant, came within 200 meters (about 218 yards) of docking ports on the manned space station, the official Tass news agency said. However, the approach was aborted during the final stage of docking "owing to an irregular function of the control system of the astrophysical laboratory Kvant," Tass said.
NEWS
November 2, 1985 | From United Press International
The astronauts aboard the shuttle Challenger repaired an experimental device in the Spacelab research module Friday, and the mission manager in West Germany said the space flight was going so well that "it's unbelievable." Scientists at the control center near Munich said the eight crew members were back on schedule with experiments that had been delayed by earlier problems, and were working at close to 100% efficiency on their third day in orbit.
NEWS
April 29, 1992 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congressional critics of NASA's plan to launch a $30-billion space laboratory into Earth orbit by the end of the decade will mount today the most spirited attack yet on the controversial project when the House debates a funding plan for the space agency. Led by Rep. Tim Roemer (D-Ind.), opponents of Space Station Freedom say they will try to strip from the 1993 federal budget virtually all of the $2.
NEWS
January 20, 1992 | From Associated Press
NASA began the countdown Sunday for the first shuttle flight of the year, a laboratory research mission by Discovery that will examine the effects of weightlessness on people, plants and bugs. "This should be a great mission for science," Ronald Grabe, the mission commander, said as he and the flight's six other astronauts arrived here.
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