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SCIENCE
May 11, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Astronauts replaced a leaking component on the International Space Station after a 5-hour, 30-minute spacewalk, NASA reported. Engineers Chris Cassidy and Tom Marshburn completed their spacewalk at 11:14 a.m. PDT Saturday, after gingerly gliding out to one of the station's trusses, where ammonia coolant had been seen leaking since Thursday. The coolant is used to control the temperature of one of eight solar arrays that power the station. The pair, who had worked in tandem during spacewalks twice before, removed the 260-pound pump controller box from the P6 truss and replaced it with a spare stowed nearby.
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SCIENCE
April 22, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
Live streaming video by Ustream The spacewalk tools have been laid out. The Quest airlock has been set up. There's a spacewalk coming, and you can watch it live right here. Early Wednesday morning NASA astronauts Rick Mastracchio and Steve Swanson will don their spacesuits for a 2 1/2 -hour spacewalk outside the International Space Station. Barring any surprises, NASA's live coverage of the event will begin at 5:30 a.m. PDT. The spacewalk itself is scheduled to start at 6:20 a.m.  The spacewalk was ordered this month to replace a computer on the space station's exterior that failed during a routine check.
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SCIENCE
December 27, 2013 | By Monte Morin
It was a day of headaches and broken records for two Russian spacewalkers Friday as the cosmonauts spent over eight hours installing two cameras on the exterior of the International Space Station, only to remove them when they failed to work. "Back and forth back and forth," quipped one of the cosmonauts as they hauled the two bulky cameras back into a space station airlock. "It was actually easier to take it out than put it in. " Commander Oleg Kotov and Flight Engineer Sergey Ryazanskiy had installed the two cameras ahead of schedule, but had to reverse course when the cameras failed to transmit telemetry and other data to ground controllers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2014 | By Joe Mozingo
Wearing a nitrogen-powered jet pack, Dale Gardner stepped from the space shuttle, alone and untethered, 224 miles above Earth. Armed with a 5-foot probe called a stinger, Gardner drifted toward a wayward satellite, the Westar 6, which was spinning slowly, 35 feet away. When he got close enough Gardner inserted the stinger into the orbiter's spent rocket nozzle and brought it to a halt. "I got it," he exclaimed. The mission to salvage the Westar and another communications satellite, the Palapa B-2, in November 1984 marked a high point of the space shuttle program, feeding a growing sense of NASA's infallibility that would end just a year later, when the Challenger exploded just after launch over Florida.
SCIENCE
July 9, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Everyone has to make time for a little home maintenance now and then, even when your home is orbiting 260 miles above the Earth. So bright and early Tuesday morning, Italian astronaut Luca Parmitano and NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy suited up for a six-hour-and-seven-minute spacewalk outside the International Space Station to knock a bunch of "to-dos" off their list. Tuesday's spacewalk was the fifth spacewalk of Cassidy's career, but the first for Parmitano, and the first for an Italian.
SCIENCE
November 8, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Live streaming video by Ustream The Olympic torch has arrived in outer space, and you can watch two cosmonauts take it out on a spacewalk, right here.  If you live on the West Coast, you are going to have to wake up early to enjoy the show. Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kotov and Sergey Ryazanskiy of Roscosmos will be venturing out of the International Space Station with the torch in hand at 6:30 a.m. PST. ISS: International Space Station crews and images from space There will be a brief photo opp, and then they will return the torch to the ISS. Next they will take care of items such as relocating a foot restraint for use on future spacewalks and getting the ISS ready for a new high-resolution camera system.
SCIENCE
May 10, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
  Astronauts on the International Space Station may take a spacewalk Saturday to repair an ammonia leak. The gas, used to cool one of the station's solar arrays, began oozing from the left side of the station's truss structure Thursday, officials said. NASA reported that the six-member Expedition 35 crew, commanded by Chris Hadfield, was not in danger, and that the station is operating normally while crew members and mission managers work to reroute power through another of the station's eight power channels.
SCIENCE
May 11, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan, This post has been corrected. See note below.
In a spacewalk, Astronauts Chris Cassidy and Tom Marshburn replaced a pump component that has been gushing ammonia coolant, NASA reported Saturday. The spacewalk got underway at 5:44 a.m. PDT and was expected to last more than six hours, according to NASA. The astronauts removed and replaced the faulty pump controller box on the far port truss of the International Space Station. No evidence of a continued ammonia leak was evident as NASA restarted the faulty coolant loop. Live footage on NASA TV showed the two working in painstakingly slow motion in alternating darkness and light as the station circled Earth.
SCIENCE
April 19, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Live video by Ustream Two Russian astronauts donned spacesuits Friday morning and climbed outside of the International Space Station to conduct a little space station maintenance. NASA is streaming the spacewalk live, and you can watch it live, right here. The two cosmonauts, Roman Romanenko, 41, and Pavel Viogradav, 59, opened the hatch of the ISS at 7:03 a.m. PDT Friday, and their spacewalk is estimated to last a total of six hours.  By venturing on this spacewalk, Viogradav becomes the oldest person to make a spacewalk, the Associated Press reports . Romanenko is a second-generation spacewalker.
NATIONAL
September 6, 2012 | By Amy Hubbard
Surrounded by expensive, high-tech equipment, astronauts Sunita Williams and Akihiko Hoshide had to resort to a toothbrush and elbow grease to fix a bolt on the International Space Station on Wednesday. This added credence to a lesson NASA's Williams said she'd learned before: "You can't get married to a plan. " She added: "It seems like something you thought was going to be difficult turns out to be easy, and something you thought was going to be easy turns out to be hard. " PHOTOS: Awesome images from space Williams wrote about the "sticky" bolt in a blog post earlier this week that revealed the patience and stamina of the Indian American astronaut, who reportedly holds the record as the woman with the longest space flight: 195 days.
SCIENCE
February 26, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
Last summer astronaut Luca Parmitano came perilously close to drowning in space after more than a liter of water leaked into his helmet. Today NASA officials said they are still trying to figure out what went wrong. The near-drowning occurred July 16 about one hour into Parmitano's second spacewalk. Forty-four minutes into the walk, the Italian astronaut noticed the back of his head was wet. Ten minutes later he reported the amount of water was increasing. By the time mission control decided to abort the mission 23 minutes later, large droplets of water were starting to cover Parmitano's eyes, nose and ears as he made his way toward the air lock.
SCIENCE
December 27, 2013 | By Monte Morin
It was a day of headaches and broken records for two Russian spacewalkers Friday as the cosmonauts spent over eight hours installing two cameras on the exterior of the International Space Station, only to remove them when they failed to work. "Back and forth back and forth," quipped one of the cosmonauts as they hauled the two bulky cameras back into a space station airlock. "It was actually easier to take it out than put it in. " Commander Oleg Kotov and Flight Engineer Sergey Ryazanskiy had installed the two cameras ahead of schedule, but had to reverse course when the cameras failed to transmit telemetry and other data to ground controllers.
SCIENCE
December 23, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Bright and early on Dec. 24, NASA astronauts Rick Mastracchio and Mike Hopkins will head out of the International Space Station to continue an essential repair to the station's cooling system that began Saturday. But first, they have to make a costume change. The Christmas Eve spacewalk is the second in a series of emergency operations to replace a pump in one of the station's two external ammonia cooling loops. The system is responsible for keeping instruments both inside and outside the station from overheating.
SCIENCE
December 23, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
NASA astronauts will make a second spacewalk in their effort to repair the International Space Station on Tuesday, and you can watch it live, right here. The Christmas Eve spacewalk begins at 4:10 a.m. PST, but if you happen to be up even earlier, NASA's coverage will begin at 3:15 a.m. And late sleepers, take comfort: The spacewalk is scheduled to last about 6 1/2 hours, and you can tune in any time. GRAPHIC: NASA's spacesuit Tuesday's spacewalk is the second to fix a problem with a pump in one of the space station's two external ammonia cooling loops.
SCIENCE
December 21, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
The first in a series of emergency spacewalks to fix a cooling system failure on the International Space Station went off without a hitch Saturday morning. In fact, it went so well that the two spacewalkers, NASA astronauts Rick Mastracchio and Michael Hopkins, were able to get a headstart on some of the tasks planned for their next spacewalk scheduled for Monday. The emergency spacewalks were arranged last week to fix a problem with a pump in one of the space station's two external ammonia cooling loops that help keep instruments both inside and outside the station from overheating.
SCIENCE
December 20, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Think you have a productive Saturday ahead? Try this: NASA astronauts are getting up bright and early to hop out into space and fix an important cooling loop pump aboard the International Space Station. The two spacewalkers, rookie Michael Hopkins and six-time veteran Rick Mastracchio , plan to replace a faulty pump in an external ammonia cooling loop that shut down last week after it got too cold. 2013: The Year in Science It's going to be a complex job , spanning a planned three separate spacewalks - and the last one is set for Christmas Day. The astronauts will have to pull a pump module about the size of a refrigerator out of one part of the space station, carefully disconnect it, and then bring over another refrigerator-size  spare to replace it. For this spacewalk , they'll start disconnecting the faulty pump and start some work on the spare one. This spacewalk is set for 4:10 a.m. Pacific Time, and NASA coverage starts an hour earlier.
NEWS
December 2, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Two astronauts will go on a second spacewalk Wednesday to conduct crucial space station tests that had to be scrapped because of last week's satellite rescue. NASA managers approved the five-hour spacewalk for the crew of space shuttle Columbia. It will be NASA's last spacewalk before construction begins next summer on the international space station.
SCIENCE
March 22, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Like handymen caulking a bathtub, two spacewalking astronauts squirted pink putty into deliberately damaged tile samples to test a new technique for repairing the space shuttle's fragile heat shield. NASA declared the experiment a huge success. "We're just thrilled with the way it turned out," Zebulon Scoville, Endeavour's lead spacewalk officer, said early Friday after the 6 1/2 -hour spacewalk ended. The space agency has been researching repair techniques since the shuttle Columbia disintegrated in 2003, killing its seven astronauts.
SCIENCE
December 20, 2013 | By Amina Khan
A pair of NASA astronauts are gearing up for a trio of spacewalks to fix a cooling loop aboard the International Space Station. The three-part show will take place Saturday, Monday and Wednesday - Christmas Day. Astronauts Rick Mastracchio and Michael Hopkins are assigned to replace a faulty pump for one of the station's two ammonia cooling loops. The loop has been out of commission since the pump automatically shut down last week after it got too cold for comfort, NASA officials said.
SCIENCE
December 17, 2013 | By Amina Khan, This story has been corrected, as indicated below.
It's official: NASA astronauts will have to step out into space to fix a faulty cooling loop at the International Space Station. Rick Mastracchio and Michael Hopkins will take on the task, which will probably take two spacewalks and could stretch to three. The spacewalks, scheduled for Dec. 21, 23 and 25, come after engineers at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston tried fiddling with a broken valve in a pump in an ammonia cooling loop to figure out what exactly was wrong with it. The pump was shut down last week after it failed to regulate the ammonia levels and it got too cold, NASA officials said.
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