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Spade Cooley

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July 9, 2005 | Shana Ting Lipton, Special to The Times
For those looking down on his star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, the name Spade Cooley probably doesn't mean very much. He was a real-life star once, known as "The King of Western Swing" back in the '40s and '50s, when he led a 30-piece band, was a fiddle virtuoso and hosted his own television variety show. Now perhaps his greatest claim to fame is an ignominious one: He's believed to be the only convicted killer with a star on the Walk of Fame. On Feb.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2011 | Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Eddie Brandt's obsession with the movies was evident in his North Hollywood home, which he transformed into an indoor-outdoor theater by installing a film projector on a tiny loft with windows and pointing it toward his yard. Saturday night was movie night at Brandt's, starting in the early 1970s. Cinema buffs — including the host — screened 16-millimeter films, viewing them through oversized windows or while sitting outside. Every day had also been movie day for Brandt since his North Hollywood thrift shop evolved into a movie memorabilia store after he bought his first warehouse of film collectibles in 1972.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
P. Basil Lambros, a prominent Los Angeles defense attorney whose cases included the murder trial of western-swing bandleader Spade Cooley and another case in which his penchant for being well dressed worked against him, has died. He was 86. Lambros died of heart failure Wednesday at Santa Monica UCLA Medical Center, said his son, Ponti. In a more than 50-year career that began in the late 1940s, Lambros may be best remembered for his unsuccessful defense of Cooley, the fiddle-playing bandleader who hosted a popular western-style variety show on KTLA Channel 5 in the late 1940s and '50s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
P. Basil Lambros, a prominent Los Angeles defense attorney whose cases included the murder trial of western-swing bandleader Spade Cooley and another case in which his penchant for being well dressed worked against him, has died. He was 86. Lambros died of heart failure Wednesday at Santa Monica UCLA Medical Center, said his son, Ponti. In a more than 50-year career that began in the late 1940s, Lambros may be best remembered for his unsuccessful defense of Cooley, the fiddle-playing bandleader who hosted a popular western-style variety show on KTLA Channel 5 in the late 1940s and '50s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2011 | Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Eddie Brandt's obsession with the movies was evident in his North Hollywood home, which he transformed into an indoor-outdoor theater by installing a film projector on a tiny loft with windows and pointing it toward his yard. Saturday night was movie night at Brandt's, starting in the early 1970s. Cinema buffs — including the host — screened 16-millimeter films, viewing them through oversized windows or while sitting outside. Every day had also been movie day for Brandt since his North Hollywood thrift shop evolved into a movie memorabilia store after he bought his first warehouse of film collectibles in 1972.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Julian J. Aberbach, 95, who with his brother, Joachim, founded Hill and Range, a music publishing company that published such familiar tunes as "Frosty the Snowman," "Save the Last Dance for Me," "I Walk the Line," and many of Elvis Presley's hits, died May 17 of heart failure at Mount Sinai Hospital in Manhattan. Born in Vienna, Aberbach was living in Paris and trying to start a music publishing company but fled to the United States as World War II approached in Europe. He served in the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Wesley Webb "Speedy" West, 79, an innovative country and western steel guitar player, died of unspecified causes Saturday in Broken Arrow, Okla. He had been in poor health since suffering a stroke in 1981. West was the first country music steel guitarist to use pedals, which helped him earn the nickname "Speedy." He performed on a custom-made instrument with three necks and four pedals. Born in Springfield, Mo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jerry Lawrence, 93, early radio and television quiz show host, disc jockey and announcer of such shows as "Truth or Consequences," died Saturday in Los Angeles of unspecified causes, his family said. Born in Rochester, N.Y., and brought up in Long Beach, Calif., Lawrence developed his radio career in the 1930s at New York City radio stations WOR, WNEW and the CBS network.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1986 | LEE MARGULIES, Times Staff Writer
Surprise! Forty years before there were music videos, there were "soundies"--short films of popular singers and bands performing their hit songs. The astonishingly unheralded life of the Mills Novelty Co.'s Panoram visual jukebox is recalled at 9:10 tonight in a nostalgic special on KCET Channel 28, "Soundies," hosted by Cab Calloway. As explained by Calloway, who appears in several of the old film clips, more than 2,000 soundies were made between 1941 and 1947.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2005 | Shana Ting Lipton, Special to The Times
For those looking down on his star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, the name Spade Cooley probably doesn't mean very much. He was a real-life star once, known as "The King of Western Swing" back in the '40s and '50s, when he led a 30-piece band, was a fiddle virtuoso and hosted his own television variety show. Now perhaps his greatest claim to fame is an ignominious one: He's believed to be the only convicted killer with a star on the Walk of Fame. On Feb.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1997 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It'll be easy to pick out Big Sandy. He'll be the big guy with the sweet voice fronting his band, Big Sandy & His Fly-Rite Boys, Friday night at the cozy Mercury Lounge in Goleta. Opening will be local legends Extract, fronted by the one and only Marjorie Extract, who continues to insist that is her real name. Big Sandy and the boys are hitting the road to push their third album, "Feelin' Kinda Lucky."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2002 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Walter Heebner, a veteran record producer who gave new life to a series of unique early 20th-century piano-roll recordings that captured the nuances of original performances by Paderewski, Mahler, Debussy, Ravel and other legendary pianists and composers, has died. He was 84. Heebner, a Studio City resident who also produced western bandleader Spade Cooley's popular show on KTLA-TV in the early 1950s, died of cancer Feb. 10 in Burbank.
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