Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSpadra Landfill
IN THE NEWS

Spadra Landfill

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 4, 1990
I would like to see more information about residents of Walnut opposing L.A. County from expanding the Spadra landfill (Times, Oct. 4.) We residents are attempting (unsuccessfully) to get our City Council to take a stand against the dump. I would also like to know if the students and their parents of Mt. San Antonio College are aware of the situation. A methane gas-emitting dump immediately adjacent to their campus! These are our future citizens and adults who will be breathing dust and methane gas six to eight hours a day--five days a week!
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1996 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First came the landfill. Now comes the landscape. And if researchers have their way, fragile oaks and native black walnut trees will soon sprout from a gaseous, 18-million-ton pile of garbage in Pomona. Horticulturists at Cal Poly Pomona are mapping plans for the tricky planting project at the 197-acre Spadra landfill when it closes in late 1999.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 14, 1994
Walnut residents are opposed to the Material Recovery Facility (MRF) being proposed by the City of Industry at the corner of Grand (Avenue) and Valley (Boulevard). Walnut is surrounded on the west by the BKK Landfill and on the east by the Spadra Landfill. We believe a "fair share" approach should be made to siting trash facilities. Industry's draft environmental impact report says Industry needs capacity to handle 600 tons of trash per day, but the MRF would handle 5,700 tons per day, generate up to 3,444 vehicles per day and add 500 tons of pollutants into the air each day. The draft environmental impact report says the MRF would have 35 "significant" and "unavoidable" environmental impacts that "cannot be mitigated."
NEWS
July 14, 1994
Walnut residents are opposed to the Material Recovery Facility (MRF) being proposed by the City of Industry at the corner of Grand (Avenue) and Valley (Boulevard). Walnut is surrounded on the west by the BKK Landfill and on the east by the Spadra Landfill. We believe a "fair share" approach should be made to siting trash facilities. Industry's draft environmental impact report says Industry needs capacity to handle 600 tons of trash per day, but the MRF would handle 5,700 tons per day, generate up to 3,444 vehicles per day and add 500 tons of pollutants into the air each day. The draft environmental impact report says the MRF would have 35 "significant" and "unavoidable" environmental impacts that "cannot be mitigated."
NEWS
September 28, 1986 | MIKE WARD, Times Staff Writer
The owners of the BKK landfill in West Covina say they may drastically limit disposal there starting next week, a move that the head of the county Sanitation Districts says would aggravate what is already a trash-disposal crisis in Los Angeles County. BKK President Kenneth Kazarian said his company may impose drastic limits on disposal at its dump as early as Wednesday unless regulatory agencies agree to modify restrictions on placement of trash.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1987 | MIKE WARD, Times Staff Writer
Directors of the county Sanitation Districts voted Monday to drop plans to build a controversial $165-million waste-to-energy plant at the Spadra landfill in Pomona. James F. Stahl, assistant general manager, told directors that although the project is "technically and environmentally sound," it has lost the support of the cities it was designed to serve.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1989
I read with interest Anne C. Roark's article "UCLA Identifies a Major Source of Pollution--Itself" (Metro, June 15). Cal Poly Pomona shares UCLA's concern about the degradation of the environment. Furthermore, we are deeply committed to dealing with environmental issues as part of our ongoing university operations. Cal Poly Pomona has been one of the pioneers in the use of recycled waste water. In the 1960s and 1970s, we used reclaimed water to irrigate about 25% of the campus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1996 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First came the landfill. Now comes the landscape. And if researchers have their way, fragile oaks and native black walnut trees will soon sprout from a gaseous, 18-million-ton pile of garbage in Pomona. Horticulturists at Cal Poly Pomona are mapping plans for the tricky planting project at the 197-acre Spadra landfill when it closes in late 1999.
NEWS
January 22, 1987
The City Council approved Covina Disposal Co.'s request to raise the monthly residential refuse rate from $6.50 to $7. In a letter to the council, company officials said the increase was necessary to cover higher transportation costs resulting from a change in the landfill the company uses. The company previously used disposal sites in West Covina and Azusa, but changed last year because of increases in dumping fees at both sites, officials said.
NEWS
November 8, 1990
The City Council voted this week to create a 25-member residents committee to recommend tax and fee increases to offset planned reductions in the city utility tax. City staff members have proposed eight revenue measures totaling $1.7 million, but the council acted on only one of them: a surcharge on dumping at the Spadra landfill that will raise $102,000.
NEWS
November 4, 1990
I would like to see more information about residents of Walnut opposing L.A. County from expanding the Spadra landfill (Times, Oct. 4.) We residents are attempting (unsuccessfully) to get our City Council to take a stand against the dump. I would also like to know if the students and their parents of Mt. San Antonio College are aware of the situation. A methane gas-emitting dump immediately adjacent to their campus! These are our future citizens and adults who will be breathing dust and methane gas six to eight hours a day--five days a week!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1989
I read with interest Anne C. Roark's article "UCLA Identifies a Major Source of Pollution--Itself" (Metro, June 15). Cal Poly Pomona shares UCLA's concern about the degradation of the environment. Furthermore, we are deeply committed to dealing with environmental issues as part of our ongoing university operations. Cal Poly Pomona has been one of the pioneers in the use of recycled waste water. In the 1960s and 1970s, we used reclaimed water to irrigate about 25% of the campus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1987 | MIKE WARD, Times Staff Writer
Directors of the county Sanitation Districts voted Monday to drop plans to build a controversial $165-million waste-to-energy plant at the Spadra landfill in Pomona. James F. Stahl, assistant general manager, told directors that although the project is "technically and environmentally sound," it has lost the support of the cities it was designed to serve.
NEWS
September 28, 1986 | MIKE WARD, Times Staff Writer
The owners of the BKK landfill in West Covina say they may drastically limit disposal there starting next week, a move that the head of the county Sanitation Districts says would aggravate what is already a trash-disposal crisis in Los Angeles County. BKK President Kenneth Kazarian said his company may impose drastic limits on disposal at its dump as early as Wednesday unless regulatory agencies agree to modify restrictions on placement of trash.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1989
A Culver City company was charged Tuesday with illegally transporting 150 gallons of waste paint to the Spadra Landfill in Pomona. Prestige Homes was scheduled to be arraigned July 28 on three violations of the health and safety code, including transporting hazardous waste and disposing of the waste. If convicted, the company could be fined up to $100,000. Deputy Dist. Atty.
NEWS
September 15, 1988
Residents will be able to dispose of household hazardous waste from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday at Puente Hills landfill, 2800 S. Workman Mill Road. Used motor oil, car batteries, pesticides, cleaning products and other unwanted materials can be taken to the landfill for collection by hazardous waste contractors. A spokesman for the county Sanitation Districts, which runs the landfill, said paint, explosives and ammunition will not be accepted.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|