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NEWS
October 1, 1992 | CHRIS PASLES, Chris Pasles covers dance for The Times Orange County Edition.
Leonide Massine's comic ballet "The Three-Cornered Hat," which the Spanish Nacional Ballet will dance at the Performing Arts Center Oct. 6 through 11, embodies the soul of sunny Spain. But behind its authenticity lies a personal tragedy.
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NEWS
September 29, 1992 | JOHN POLLACK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In this isolated hamlet where stooped women still plow rocky plots with yoked oxen, the day that the shepherds return triumphant each year from distant summer pastures may soon pass into village history. Smelling as earthy as their language, seven weary shepherds have just spent two months in the mountains, herding about 6,000 sheep and a score of goats along a winding, nationwide network of trails that a Spanish king granted their forebears some seven centuries ago.
NEWS
June 18, 1992 | JANICE L. JONES, Janice L. Jones is a member of The Times Orange County Edition staff.
At the Festival Espanol being hosted by the San Juan Capistrano Regional Library on Saturday, you'll be able to check out rarely performed Andalusian music and dancing while sampling food and crafts from all regions of Spain. Amid the displays of Spanish ceramics, icons, enamels, silver and damask will be booths offering paella, empanadas and other examples of Spanish regional cuisine.
NEWS
April 16, 1992 | CHRIS PASLES, Chris Pasles covers music and dance for The Times Orange County Edition
For nearly five generations of Americans, the name Jose Greco has been synonymous with Spanish dance. But when Greco comes to the Irvine Barclay Theatre tonight through Saturday, Orange County audiences will also see a second generation of family dancers. The 72-year-old patriarch will be joined by daughters Carmela, Lola and Alessandra, and son Jose Greco II. Jose Luis Greco, the eldest of his three sons, will serve as musical director.
MAGAZINE
January 19, 1992 | JORDAN ELGRABLY, Jordan Elgrably recently returned to the United States after 10 years in Paris and Madrid. He is the L.A. correspondent for Vogue Espana .
DON'T ASK PEDRO ALMODOVAR HOW HE MADE THE QUANTUM LEAP from rebel of Spain's counterculture to mainstream symbol of commercial respectability. While he hates to admit he's no longer on the edge, he also challenges the bad-boy reputation that has followed him everywhere. "Hombre," the director says, a corona of cigarette smoke framing his cherub's face as he takes a break on the set of his new movie, "High Heels," "my success surprises me because, I tell you, success is a miracle."
NEWS
January 12, 1992 | SUE FACTER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
L ate in the afternoon on bullfight days, the sun slants menacingly against the irregular geometry of Andalusian villages. The air is charged with excitement, and in the distance, a flamenco guitar can be heard, softly at first . Soon, the music is louder and raspier and cruel . . . . Can't make it to southern Spain for flamenco? On weekends, there's "Flamenco at the Fountain"--that's the Fountain Theatre, a small Equity theater in Hollywood.
SPORTS
December 25, 1991 | TOM HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jared and Patti Black's fashionable suburban home has all the Christmas trimmings. There are lights outside, and a majestic tree stands in the living room. The family began their holiday celebration on Christmas Eve with a 5 p.m. church service and then the traditional Cheddar cheese fondu for dinner. It's a typical Christmas at the Black family home--with one exception. This year, the Blacks are playing host to Mikel Reta, a foreign exchange student from Pampalona, Spain.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1991 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sociologists in Spain are worried about a new Spanish addiction: Millions of Spaniards are mesmerized by the Latin-American soap operas that dominate television these days during the long Spanish lunch break. "The plague of Latin-American soap operas," warns the weekly newsmagazine Cambio 16, "is contaminating Spanish culture." Their popularity, in the view of some intellectuals, does not reflect well on the taste of Spaniards.
NEWS
January 1, 1991 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the 1970s, when Anna Balletbo was a television reporter, she and some of her colleagues devised a way to defy the dictator Francisco Franco by sneaking the Catalan language on the air. They would interview people from the Barcelona area in Spanish but surreptitiously ask them to reply in Catalan. "Then we would go back to the studio," she recalled recently, "and say, 'I'm sorry. I asked my questions in Spanish, but they replied in Catalan. What could I do?'
NEWS
November 6, 1990 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES TAFF WRITER
The leading newspapers of Spain are stolid and gray and thoughtful, befitting a nation that transformed itself from a dictatorship to a democracy in the late 1970s and early 1980s with the press chronicling and analyzing and encouraging every hesitant step of the way.
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