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BUSINESS
February 21, 1993 | JOHN POLLACK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The twin skyscrapers that lean like modern towers of Pisa at the Plaza de Castilla here were supposed to be the city skyline's architectural signature--bold monuments to the nation's prosperity. But on closer inspection, their naked steel girders betray a billion-dollar bankruptcy and a boom decade gone bust. After years of record growth, Spain is suffering its worst economic crisis in a decade. The national economy is faltering, financial scandals clog the courts and pessimism prevails.
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BUSINESS
October 23, 2013 | By Shan Li
Spain pulled out of two years of recession in the third quarter, news that should give a boost to the efforts of its prime minister to repair the nation's economy though tax increases and spending cuts. The Bank of Spain said Wednesday that gross domestic product grew 0.1% in the third quarter, compared with a 1.2% drop in the same period a year ago. The news, while positive, has been viewed skeptically by some economists who point out the Spanish economy has slipped more than once into recession in the last five years.
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BUSINESS
September 25, 1989 | From Associated Press
Citizens of eight West European countries, led by Switzerland, earned more than Americans in 1988, according to figures made available by the World Bank on Friday. Switzerland's per-capita income last year was $20,130, while in the United States per capita income was $14,080. The others ahead of the United States: Luxembourg, $19,960; Sweden, $17,160; Iceland, $16,480; West Germany, $15,880; Norway, $15,250; Denmark, $14,530 and France, $14,130.
BUSINESS
April 7, 2007 | Tracy Wilkinson, Times Staff Writer
Jorge Luis Garcia Garcia got in on the ground floor of Spain's economic bonanza. Fifteen years ago he was a Peruvian immigrant working two jobs, washing dishes by day and stoking bakery ovens by night. Today he owns a prosperous construction firm, supplies loading trucks to other builders and is about to expand into recycling. He owns a home and cars and employs other immigrants, as well as a few Spaniards. "The doors are wide-open here," Garcia said. "If you hop to it, you can get ahead.
NEWS
October 10, 1992 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seasons change. A gigantic national celebration of Spain's historic and democratic accomplishments is ending here, overtaken almost overnight by vexing questions about the Spanish future. "It was a big fiesta, but now the accounts are coming due, and as usual it is the everyday people who are asked to pay," said Maruja Torres, a naysaying columnist at the newspaper El Pais.
NEWS
March 17, 1992 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Virgilio Zapatero smiles an author's smile of pride and conviction. "It's the greatest show on Earth," he says softly. Zapatero is the government minister coordinating the most elaborate fiesta in Spanish history. This is Spain's year: Espana '92, nickname for a national dream.
NEWS
December 15, 1989 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four bridges span the indolent Guadalquivir River here today, legacy of 20 centuries of settlement that began in Roman times. Over the next three years, seven new bridges will be built across the muddy river that is Seville's trademark and its lifeblood. Storied Seville, one giant detour now, is in the throes of the greatest face lift in its history.
BUSINESS
July 19, 1992 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Latin American leaders headed for a summit in Madrid this week--the serious side of Spain's commemoration of Columbus' voyage to the New World--are looking to satisfy more than 500 years of nostalgia.
BUSINESS
July 19, 1992 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spanish investors looking for opportunities in Latin America most often target Mexico, enticed by progress in economic reform and the market potential. In addition to 80 million Mexican consumers, prospective investors see the possibility of access to 280 million consumers in the United States and Canada if the proposed North America free trade agreement is signed.
BUSINESS
March 5, 1989 | From Reuters
Spain's stock exchanges will soon be transformed from a creaking system dating to the Napoleonic era into a modern electronic marketplace. Luis Carlos Croissier, chairman of the newly created National Securities Commission, says the changes will be more profound than the so-called "Big Bang" that revolutionized London's financial markets in 1986. "Our 'Big Bang,' if we compare it with its point of departure, will be a much bigger transformation than what the United Kingdom experienced," he said.
NEWS
March 28, 2000 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Maria Jose Mateo's midday routine is a daring act of defiance against a force that has ruled Spain for centuries. The 29-year-old bank employee tries to stay awake. Up at 6 a.m. after six hours of sleep, she works 8 to 3, has a heavy lunch at her parents' home and dashes back to the office by about 5 p.m. to work till 9, leaving her father dozing on the couch and feeling quite drowsy herself. As hard as she resists, the 40-minute subway ride usually lulls her into submission.
NEWS
July 2, 1999 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA and CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Spaniards are back. Their return has been called "the reconquest." It is the latest stage in the remarkable evolution of the complex, intense and increasingly lucrative relationship between Spain and its former Latin American colonies. Here in Venezuela's capital, banker Juan Carlos Zorrilla is the new face of Spain.
BUSINESS
February 21, 1993 | JOHN POLLACK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The twin skyscrapers that lean like modern towers of Pisa at the Plaza de Castilla here were supposed to be the city skyline's architectural signature--bold monuments to the nation's prosperity. But on closer inspection, their naked steel girders betray a billion-dollar bankruptcy and a boom decade gone bust. After years of record growth, Spain is suffering its worst economic crisis in a decade. The national economy is faltering, financial scandals clog the courts and pessimism prevails.
NEWS
October 10, 1992 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seasons change. A gigantic national celebration of Spain's historic and democratic accomplishments is ending here, overtaken almost overnight by vexing questions about the Spanish future. "It was a big fiesta, but now the accounts are coming due, and as usual it is the everyday people who are asked to pay," said Maruja Torres, a naysaying columnist at the newspaper El Pais.
BUSINESS
July 19, 1992 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Latin American leaders headed for a summit in Madrid this week--the serious side of Spain's commemoration of Columbus' voyage to the New World--are looking to satisfy more than 500 years of nostalgia.
BUSINESS
July 19, 1992 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spanish investors looking for opportunities in Latin America most often target Mexico, enticed by progress in economic reform and the market potential. In addition to 80 million Mexican consumers, prospective investors see the possibility of access to 280 million consumers in the United States and Canada if the proposed North America free trade agreement is signed.
NEWS
March 28, 2000 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Maria Jose Mateo's midday routine is a daring act of defiance against a force that has ruled Spain for centuries. The 29-year-old bank employee tries to stay awake. Up at 6 a.m. after six hours of sleep, she works 8 to 3, has a heavy lunch at her parents' home and dashes back to the office by about 5 p.m. to work till 9, leaving her father dozing on the couch and feeling quite drowsy herself. As hard as she resists, the 40-minute subway ride usually lulls her into submission.
NEWS
July 2, 1999 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA and CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Spaniards are back. Their return has been called "the reconquest." It is the latest stage in the remarkable evolution of the complex, intense and increasingly lucrative relationship between Spain and its former Latin American colonies. Here in Venezuela's capital, banker Juan Carlos Zorrilla is the new face of Spain.
NEWS
March 17, 1992 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Virgilio Zapatero smiles an author's smile of pride and conviction. "It's the greatest show on Earth," he says softly. Zapatero is the government minister coordinating the most elaborate fiesta in Spanish history. This is Spain's year: Espana '92, nickname for a national dream.
NEWS
December 15, 1989 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four bridges span the indolent Guadalquivir River here today, legacy of 20 centuries of settlement that began in Roman times. Over the next three years, seven new bridges will be built across the muddy river that is Seville's trademark and its lifeblood. Storied Seville, one giant detour now, is in the throes of the greatest face lift in its history.
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