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NEWS
February 12, 1987 | Associated Press
Masked youths attacked the Spanish Education Ministry with gasoline bombs, clubs and chains Wednesday after a peaceful march by thousands of students protesting national education policies. Protest marches were held in other cities as well. Rioters hurled gasoline bombs at government buildings in the Basque city of Bilbao, and demonstrators clashed with police in Murcia and Huesca, Spanish national radio RNE reported.
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NEWS
February 18, 1987
The Education Ministry in Spain, beginning a new round of talks with student leaders after nine weeks of student protests, announced the abolition of public high school fees and the waiving of similar charges for many enrolled at universities. Yearly fees of about $14 have been charged at state-run high schools. College students from lower-income families will be exempt from paying fees averaging $284 a year at Spain's 30 state universities, education officials said.
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NEWS
February 7, 1987 | United Press International
High school students demanding lower fees and easier admission to college pelted riot police with rocks and garbage Friday at a rally outside government headquarters, despite a ban on demonstrations. City officials said 13 police officers and seven students were injured in three hours of skirmishes, and 17 students were arrested. The clashes marked the latest violence in six weeks of protests by Spain's 2.1 million public high school students.
NEWS
February 12, 1987 | Associated Press
Masked youths attacked the Spanish Education Ministry with gasoline bombs, clubs and chains Wednesday after a peaceful march by thousands of students protesting national education policies. Protest marches were held in other cities as well. Rioters hurled gasoline bombs at government buildings in the Basque city of Bilbao, and demonstrators clashed with police in Murcia and Huesca, Spanish national radio RNE reported.
NEWS
February 18, 1987
The Education Ministry in Spain, beginning a new round of talks with student leaders after nine weeks of student protests, announced the abolition of public high school fees and the waiving of similar charges for many enrolled at universities. Yearly fees of about $14 have been charged at state-run high schools. College students from lower-income families will be exempt from paying fees averaging $284 a year at Spain's 30 state universities, education officials said.
SPORTS
July 26, 1994 | SHAV GLICK
Has Spain become the world's latest sporting power? A look at Sunday's results might lead to that conclusion. Miguel Indurain won the Tour de France for the fourth year in a row. Conchita Martinez and Arantxa Sanchez-Vicario led Spain to a clean sweep of the United States in the Federation Cup tennis final at Frankfurt. Alberto Berasategui won the Mercedes Cup tennis championship. And Miguel Angel Jimenez won the Dutch Open golf tournament by two strokes.
TRAVEL
December 26, 2004 | Maggie Barnett, Times Staff Writer
ARIZONA A grand geological adventure WITNESS geological forces at work on a five-day backpacking trip into the Grand Canyon starting March 11. The trek, led by geologist Wayne Ranney, will cover 26 miles over four days. Hikers will descend from the South Rim down the Hermit Trail to the floor of the canyon and the Colorado River. "This is an ideal route to be exposed to the major forces that continue to carve the Grand Canyon," said Michael Buchheit, director of the Grand Canyon Field Institute.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2006 | Joshua Jelly-Schapiro, Special to The Times
"YOU know me, I am one of you." So said the bird when he arrived among the fish. Blessed with the ability to live in air or water, he had lived happily among the birds until their king came demanding his taxes, at which point the amphibious bird plunged into the sea. Claiming kinship with the fish, the bird found comfort among them. But when the fish-king came around for his taxes, the bird shot from the water and rejoined the flock.
NEWS
July 23, 1993 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER; Times staff reporter Tyler Marshall in Berlin contributed to this story
Jose Ignacio Lopez de Arriortua rode into the Motor City last year with missionary zeal. Charged with reversing General Motors' flagging fortunes, he preached of saving no less than Western civilization with a new Industrial Revolution. Using guile, persuasion--and, some say, deceit--the mercurial Spaniard succeeded at GM, saving the company as much as $2 billion by wresting lower prices from reluctant suppliers and turning the stodgy auto maker's corporate culture upside down.
NEWS
February 7, 1987 | United Press International
High school students demanding lower fees and easier admission to college pelted riot police with rocks and garbage Friday at a rally outside government headquarters, despite a ban on demonstrations. City officials said 13 police officers and seven students were injured in three hours of skirmishes, and 17 students were arrested. The clashes marked the latest violence in six weeks of protests by Spain's 2.1 million public high school students.
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