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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1987 | ALFREDO GOMEZ, Associated Press
When Queen Isabella sent Christopher Columbus off to sea in 1492, she also expelled Jews from Spain. Now, as the 500th anniversary of Columbus' discovery of America nears, Spain is offering Sephardic Jews around the world a special place in the celebrations. Sepharad is the Hebrew name for Spain. Sephardim are descendants of the people expelled by Queen Isabella, or those who follow Sephardic rites.
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NEWS
April 5, 2011
  In addition to everything else that Madrid has to offer, there are numerous possibilities for day trips that are less than an hour away. So it’s easy to get a complete change of scenery without packing your suitcase or hunting for lodging.    Aranjuez Other than flamenco, no music cries “Spain” in such vivid harmonic flourishes as Joaquin Rodrigo’s dramatic  “Concierto de Aranjuez.” So what better way to immerse yourself in Spain’s glory than to stroll the gardens that inspired this iconic piece of music?
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NEWS
December 14, 1990 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Almost 500 years after its expulsion of the Jews, Spain is trying to reach out to their descendants all over the world, but the task is troubling, disquieting, fraught with hidden complexity. Few problems, however, are visible amid all the ceremony. King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella of Spain expelled the Jews in 1492--the same year that the royal couple completed the conquest of Spain from the Arabs and the same year that Columbus, in their pay, discovered America.
OPINION
March 21, 2004 | Henry Kamen, Henry Kamen is the author of "Empire: How Spain Became a World Power, 1492-1763."
The train-bombing massacre carried out by Islamic terrorists in Spain on the eve of a general election had clear motives: to force a change of government, which it achieved; and to get Spanish troops out of Iraq, which it will certainly achieve. How to account for this astonishing success of the Islamic fundamentalist cause in Spain? More than any other Western country, Spain has lived on intimate terms with Islam.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1992 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella of Spain are famed as the monarchs who financed Christopher Columbus' 1492 venture into the unknown. But they are also remembered as unforgiving persecutors who sought to expel all unconverted Jews from Spain the year Columbus set sail. The tragedy is detailed in two dozen chronicles that describe-- sometimes firsthand--the deprivation inflicted on tens of thousands of Jews before and after the March 31, 1492, edict. Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 2000 | ALEX MURASHKO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Early in his career, Julio Iglesias sang about a Spanish region dear to him. His father came from there. "Canto a Galicia" (Song to Galicia) reflects a longing for a northern Spanish province rich in a culture strikingly different from the country's Mediterranean image. Iglesias was inspired by this mountainous, agricultural region with a Celtic history filled with bagpipe music and folkloric dance. The region's music is not the flamenco style normally associated with Spain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1991 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a Westside synagogue last week, scholars and Sephardic Jews remembered the other landmark event of 1492. As everyone knows, Columbus reached the New World in 1492. But that same year, Spain's monarchs, Ferdinand and Isabella, also ordered the nation's Jews either to convert to Christianity or to leave the country under pain of death. At least 50,000 Jews--some believe as many as 300,000--were banished from Spain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1992 | WILLSON CUMMER
The Declaration of Independence wasn't the first New World document to express frustration with European rule. In 1585, a native Andean began writing an illustrated letter to the king of Spain criticizing the brutality and incompetence of the conquistadors. One drawing in the letter shows a Spanish horseman trampling an Andean who lies moaning on the ground. Guaman Poma de Ayala spent 30 years working on his letter, which grew to 1,188 pages.
NEWS
October 19, 1991 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Spaniards, Madrid's selection as the site of the Mideast peace conference is a romantic chance to redress the troubled history of 500 years ago and reassert Spain as a crossroads of the Muslim and Jewish worlds. Spaniards, in fact, believe that this history and their special geography make Spain a natural host for the conference scheduled to start Oct. 30.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1999 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Like lost holy relics, the ancient treaties that marked the surrender of much of Islamic Spain to Christian conquerors in the 13th century were deemed missing for centuries--believed to have mysteriously disappeared in the Middle Ages. But a pair of Los Angeles scholars recently made a remarkable discovery at the Royal Archives in Barcelona when they recovered two surrender treaties from the Muslim-Christian wars.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 2000 | ALEX MURASHKO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Early in his career, Julio Iglesias sang about a Spanish region dear to him. His father came from there. "Canto a Galicia" (Song to Galicia) reflects a longing for a northern Spanish province rich in a culture strikingly different from the country's Mediterranean image. Iglesias was inspired by this mountainous, agricultural region with a Celtic history filled with bagpipe music and folkloric dance. The region's music is not the flamenco style normally associated with Spain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1999 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Like lost holy relics, the ancient treaties that marked the surrender of much of Islamic Spain to Christian conquerors in the 13th century were deemed missing for centuries--believed to have mysteriously disappeared in the Middle Ages. But a pair of Los Angeles scholars recently made a remarkable discovery at the Royal Archives in Barcelona when they recovered two surrender treaties from the Muslim-Christian wars.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 1998 | DANNY FEINGOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Back in the early 1960s, a young Jewish vocalist stumbled upon a few unusual Spanish-language songs. Assuming they were from South America, she incorporated them into her eclectic repertoire of ethnic music. It was a nice addition, but nothing more. Judy Frankel had no idea that the songs were artifacts of an endangered culture, nor that she would one day devote herself to preserving this rich heritage.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1992 | DONNA ROSENTHAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Racist graffiti is scrawled on this city's only synagogue, groups of young soccer fans wave swastika banners in the stadium, some toy shops sell Adolf Hitler dolls, and a common expression seems to be, " Hacer una judiada, " which means to do something Jewish--bad or greedy.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1992 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In 1585, Felipe Guaman Poma de Ayala began writing a letter to the king of Spain. That in itself was an audacious act for a native Andean under Peru's repressive colonial regime. But Guaman Poma went far beyond merely audacious: His illustrated "letter" contained 1,188 pages and, among other things, extensively detailed the abuse of Indians and the decimation of Andean culture at the hands of the Spanish colonial administration. He even offered the monarch his advice on a better government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1992 | WILLSON CUMMER
The Declaration of Independence wasn't the first New World document to express frustration with European rule. In 1585, a native Andean began writing an illustrated letter to the king of Spain criticizing the brutality and incompetence of the conquistadors. One drawing in the letter shows a Spanish horseman trampling an Andean who lies moaning on the ground. Guaman Poma de Ayala spent 30 years working on his letter, which grew to 1,188 pages.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 1998 | DANNY FEINGOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Back in the early 1960s, a young Jewish vocalist stumbled upon a few unusual Spanish-language songs. Assuming they were from South America, she incorporated them into her eclectic repertoire of ethnic music. It was a nice addition, but nothing more. Judy Frankel had no idea that the songs were artifacts of an endangered culture, nor that she would one day devote herself to preserving this rich heritage.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1992 | DONNA ROSENTHAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Racist graffiti is scrawled on this city's only synagogue, groups of young soccer fans wave swastika banners in the stadium, some toy shops sell Adolf Hitler dolls, and a common expression seems to be, " Hacer una judiada, " which means to do something Jewish--bad or greedy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1992 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This year, amid commemorations and critiques of the 500th anniversary of Christopher Columbus' voyage from Spain into the unknown, scholars are examining another quincentennial with a critical eye. The expulsion of all unconverted Jews from Spain in 1492 during the notorious Spanish Inquisition was long thought to have involved as many as 300,000 Jews. Historians have said the expulsion had a disastrous effect on Spain's economy, forcing out most of its financial wizards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1992 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella of Spain are famed as the monarchs who financed Christopher Columbus' 1492 venture into the unknown. But they are also remembered as unforgiving persecutors who sought to expel all unconverted Jews from Spain the year Columbus set sail. The tragedy is detailed in two dozen chronicles that describe-- sometimes firsthand--the deprivation inflicted on tens of thousands of Jews before and after the March 31, 1492, edict. Dr.
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