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NEWS
December 15, 1988
A nationwide strike paralyzed Spain, halting work at major industries, closing state offices and choking public transportation to a trickle. Union leaders called Spain's first general strike in 54 years a "complete success." Police reported sporadic violence and made at least 30 arrests. Jose Manuel de la Parra, spokesman for the Communist-dominated Workers Commissions, said the strike succeeded "beyond our greatest expectations."
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NEWS
August 22, 1987 | United Press International
Air traffic controllers in Barcelona announced Friday that they will stage a 24-hour strike today that could affect as many as 1,400 holiday flights through Spanish airspace. About 140 controllers are to take part in the walkout to demand overtime pay that they say is owed from the past eight years.
NEWS
November 14, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All summer, as Spaniards watched with incomprehension and distaste, homeless African refugees camped in a landmark plaza watched over by a doleful statue of Don Quixote. It was a downtown stage starkly set with the paramount symbol of the old insular Spain and harbingers of a new multiracial society. Both are players in a nascent drama abrasive and bewildering to both. "Madrid is not like the other European capitals. . . . Spain has been closed so long that people don't know about blacks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1987 | Associated Press
Employees of Spain's state rail company went on strike Wednesday to protest the company's job reductions that have eliminated 5,000 jobs, union and company spokesmen said. About 12,000 passengers were affected by staggered three-hour strikes, a company spokesman said.
NEWS
May 14, 1987 | From Reuters
Management and unions at the strike-plagued state airline Iberia signed an agreement Wednesday giving 18,000 workers pay increases of 5.8% and ending one of Spain's most damaging labor disputes, a company spokesman said. The negotiations were a major test of the government's effort to keep pay boosts at around 5%.
NEWS
June 2, 1989 | From Associated Press
Workers at the state-run Spanish television began a 24-hour strike for better pay Thursday, canceling programming for only the second time since broadcasting began in 1956.
NEWS
February 14, 1989 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
For decades, Spain's Socialist Party and Socialist labor unions have run like twin trains on parallel tracks. Now they are hurtling toward a collision that could rattle Spain's prospering young democracy. After six years of Socialist government, Prime Minister Felipe Gonzalez looks at Spain's buoyant economy with satisfaction. Gonzalez, aloof and elegant, sees a bright future for a brawny Spain in a united Europe.
NEWS
November 14, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All summer, as Spaniards watched with incomprehension and distaste, homeless African refugees camped in a landmark plaza watched over by a doleful statue of Don Quixote. It was a downtown stage starkly set with the paramount symbol of the old insular Spain and harbingers of a new multiracial society. Both are players in a nascent drama abrasive and bewildering to both. "Madrid is not like the other European capitals. . . . Spain has been closed so long that people don't know about blacks.
NEWS
June 2, 1989 | From Associated Press
Workers at the state-run Spanish television began a 24-hour strike for better pay Thursday, canceling programming for only the second time since broadcasting began in 1956.
NEWS
February 14, 1989 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
For decades, Spain's Socialist Party and Socialist labor unions have run like twin trains on parallel tracks. Now they are hurtling toward a collision that could rattle Spain's prospering young democracy. After six years of Socialist government, Prime Minister Felipe Gonzalez looks at Spain's buoyant economy with satisfaction. Gonzalez, aloof and elegant, sees a bright future for a brawny Spain in a united Europe.
NEWS
December 15, 1988
A nationwide strike paralyzed Spain, halting work at major industries, closing state offices and choking public transportation to a trickle. Union leaders called Spain's first general strike in 54 years a "complete success." Police reported sporadic violence and made at least 30 arrests. Jose Manuel de la Parra, spokesman for the Communist-dominated Workers Commissions, said the strike succeeded "beyond our greatest expectations."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1987 | Associated Press
Employees of Spain's state rail company went on strike Wednesday to protest the company's job reductions that have eliminated 5,000 jobs, union and company spokesmen said. About 12,000 passengers were affected by staggered three-hour strikes, a company spokesman said.
NEWS
August 22, 1987 | United Press International
Air traffic controllers in Barcelona announced Friday that they will stage a 24-hour strike today that could affect as many as 1,400 holiday flights through Spanish airspace. About 140 controllers are to take part in the walkout to demand overtime pay that they say is owed from the past eight years.
NEWS
May 14, 1987 | From Reuters
Management and unions at the strike-plagued state airline Iberia signed an agreement Wednesday giving 18,000 workers pay increases of 5.8% and ending one of Spain's most damaging labor disputes, a company spokesman said. The negotiations were a major test of the government's effort to keep pay boosts at around 5%.
WORLD
November 20, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
Spanish voters chucked out their ruling party Sunday in favor of a new center-right government that they hope will revive their moribund economy and keep Spain from being sucked into the vortex of Europe's relentless debt crisis. The Socialists, who have governed the country since 2004, were resoundingly defeated by the Popular Party, which will now enjoy a commanding majority in parliament. The drubbing added to the cascade of leaders and governments in Europe that have fallen within the last year — Spain's turnover is the sixth — because of the crisis threatening the survival of the euro.
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