Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSpain Law
IN THE NEWS

Spain Law

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 5, 2001 | Associated Press
Thousands of people, many of them immigrants from Asia, Africa and Eastern Europe, marched Sunday to protest a tough new law that threatens illegal immigrants with immediate expulsion. Organizers said about 40,000 protesters marched to the offices of the Interior Ministry to push for work and residency papers. Police put the crowd count at 10,000. The protest comes after a two-week hunger strike staged by about 700 immigrants.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 5, 2001 | Associated Press
Thousands of people, many of them immigrants from Asia, Africa and Eastern Europe, marched Sunday to protest a tough new law that threatens illegal immigrants with immediate expulsion. Organizers said about 40,000 protesters marched to the offices of the Interior Ministry to push for work and residency papers. Police put the crowd count at 10,000. The protest comes after a two-week hunger strike staged by about 700 immigrants.
Advertisement
WORLD
July 3, 2005 | From Associated Press
Tens of thousands of people, many dancing or banging drums, packed the streets of Madrid on Saturday to celebrate Spain's new law legalizing gay marriage. "This is infinitely gay. There are no words to express it," Ivan Sanchez, a 26-year-old pharmacist, said as the throng snaked its way through the capital.
WORLD
July 9, 2006 | Tracy Wilkinson, Times Staff Writer
Pope Benedict XVI embarked Saturday on the most contentious pilgrimage of his 15-month papacy, carrying his message of traditional family values to a country that has very diverse opinions on the matter. Spain, with its socialist government, is one of the pope's biggest challenges in what he sees as an increasingly secular, anti-religious West.
NEWS
June 14, 1994 | GARY ABRAMSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hoping for a hit, Spanish director Jose Luis Garcia tried last fall to book the debut of his new movie into Madrid's theaters at the peak of the Christmas season. But his distributor, United International Pictures, decided instead to release "Tirano Banderas" ("Banderas the Tyrant") in mid-January, at the close of the seasonal moviegoing gold rush. The reason: Nearly all the high-season dates had been reserved for what are considered better box-office bets in Spain--American movies.
WORLD
March 9, 2014 | By Henry Chu
MADRID - Reminders of her son hang close to Pilar Manjon's heart. There's the necklace she wears with his name, Daniel, and the golden pendant bearing his first initial. A locket holds a tiny snapshot of his handsome face, smiling with the promise of a life that was abruptly cut short, along with scores of others, a decade ago in the deadliest Islamic terrorist attack on European soil. Daniel, 20, was heading into downtown Madrid the morning of March 11, 2004, when a series of bombs exploded within minutes aboard four packed commuter trains.
WORLD
January 7, 2011 | By Hazel Healy, Los Angeles Times
Emilia Giron never forgot her second son. She wanted to name him Jesus, but he was taken from her in the hospital to be baptized and was never returned. He was stolen while she was imprisoned by Gen. Francisco Franco's regime, in the early 1940s, after the country's bitter civil war. "I felt that anguish all my life," Giron told a historian 60 years later. "I carried him for nine months and I never got to know him. Pain like that does not go away. I will take it with me into the next life.
OPINION
December 5, 2007 | Ian Buruma, Ian Buruma is a contributing editor to Opinion. He is a professor of human rights at Bard College, and his most recent book is "Murder in Amsterdam: The Killing of Theo van Gogh and the Limits of Tolerance."
In October, the Spanish parliament passed the Law of Historical Memory, which bans rallies and memorials celebrating the late dictator Francisco Franco. His Falangist regime will be officially denounced and its victims honored. There are plausible reasons for enacting such a law. Many people killed by the fascists during the Spanish Civil War lie unremembered in mass graves. There is still a certain degree of nostalgia on the far right for Franco's dictatorship.
WORLD
December 20, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
After Russian President Vladimir Putin's decision to pardon his arch foe Mikhail Khodorkovsky, much of the world is asking: "Why now?" Putin clearly wants to clean up his human rights record before the Olympic Winter Games, which open in the southern Russian resort of Sochi in a mere seven weeks, and Khodorkovsky's decade-long imprisonment on what have been widely viewed as politically motivated charges was the most glaring blemish. But the "why now?" question might better be asked of Khodorkovsky, who has stubbornly refused to bargain for his freedom with guilty pleas and mea culpas that the Kremlin has sought to legitimize its repression of the former oil tycoon in the eyes of the Russian public.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|