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FOOD
September 14, 1995
The sickeningly cute article about that salty, fatty, disgusting stuff called Spam is more an an advertisement than it is news of any kind. I would certainly be more interested in an article about the struggles of the union against Hormel and about the valiant people who fought for years against Hormel's callous treatment of its workers. How about a story on the nutritional inadequacies of Spam? How about a story on the fact that in America, where the stock market is soaring and the rich are rapidly getting richer, many people cannot afford to buy fresh meat?
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BUSINESS
April 23, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
AOL and Yahoo made changes to its email policies this month that will cause messages sent by some of their users to not be delivered. The changes have to do with the companies' DMARC email specification policies, and they are being adopted to prevent spammers from sending messages out of fake email accounts that are made to look like ones served by Yahoo and AOL. Spamming from these types of accounts is known as "spoofing. " VIDEO: Unboxing the Tonino Lamborghini Antares smartphone Yahoo made the change earlier this month and was followed on Tuesday by AOL , which adjusted its policy after many of its users complained spammers were sending messages to their friends and contacts from accounts that looked like their own. In some cases, spoof spam was being sent from email accounts that had been deleted by users long ago. But while the DMARC changes will circumvent spoof spam, it will also cause headaches for users whose email messages will no longer be delivered, said John Levine, an expert in email infrastructure.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2001
"Lone Guns Set Sites on Spam" (April 16) fails to mention that spam is a disruptive technology for media companies for whom advertising is a primary source of revenue. Should commercial e-mailing become a nonobstrusive avenue for soliciting business, which could very well happen as technology advances, constraints on freedom of expression would be unnecessary. Today's vigilantes would be tomorrow's enemies of liberty of expression. KEVIN KIRCHMAN CEO, Worldfree Corp. Beverly Hills I just had to comment about your article on the self-appointed Internet spam sheriffs.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
AOL Mail has changed its policies to prevent spammers from sending messages out of addresses that are made to look like real AOL email accounts. The company announced the change Tuesday afternoon after numerous users took to Twitter to complain that their accounts were being used to send spam and that changing their passwords was not resolving the issue. Some users complained that spam was being sent from AOL accounts that had been deleted. That was possible because the spam messages were not being sent from users' actual accounts.
BUSINESS
February 3, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Do happier pigs make for better Spam?Hormel Foods Corp., which makes the gelatinous canned meat, is betting yes. The Minnesota company said this week that it will stop using gestation crates by 2017. The crates, which are often so small that the pregnant hogs they house can't move, will also be disavowed within five years by McRib pork provider Smithfield Foods Inc. Seems like nowadays, with more consumers interested in the origin of what they eat, food purveyors and restaurant chains are taking care to highlight fresh, healthy - and presumably well-treated - fare.
BUSINESS
November 14, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Papa John's Pizza is facing a $250-million lawsuit from customers who claim that the fast-food chain illegally sent them 500,000 promotional text messages in 2010. The lawsuit was granted class-action status by a U.S. District Court judge in Seattle late last week, according to a statement from the Heyrich Kalish McGuigan law firm. Participants are seeking $500 for each unwanted text, which they say Papa John's sent without their permission. The complaint alleges that some of the chain's franchisees used the marketing company OnTime4U to send a flood of messages about pizza deals to a database of customers who had previously ordered from Papa John's.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Snapchat has apologized for an excessive amount of spam that some users have been receiving lately. The Los Angeles start-up, which lets users send each other picture and video messages that vanish seconds after users open them, said its team is working to reduce the spam. "While we expect to minimize spam, it is the consequence of a quickly growing service," Snapchat said in a blog .  PHOTOS: Top 10 tech gadgets we want to see in 2014 Snapchat said it does not believe the increased spam is a result of a recent data compromise, which exposed the usernames and phone numbers of millions of users.
NEWS
January 3, 2013 | By Betty Hallock
Skippy, meet Spam. Hormel Foods, the maker of Spam canned ham, is buying the brand Skippy peanut butter from consumer products giant Unilever for about $700 million. The move comes as Austin, Minn.-based Hormel is beefing up (heh) its portfolio of meats such as Farmer John sausage and Jennie-O turkey and boosting its presence overseas, according to a Los Angeles Times report . The sale includes Skippy factories in Little Rock, Ark., and Shandong Province in China , CNN says . Hormel Chief Executive Jeffrey M. Ettinger told analysts in a conference call that he expected Skippy to become one of the company's biggest brands.
OPINION
December 31, 2003
Legislators are creating a great ballyhoo over spam, telemarketers and privacy to create the impression that they are passing important legislation. Instead they are busy sending our money to Iraq and, in the case of Medicare, to the large drug companies. As for privacy, most of our commercially relevant information is in databases readily available for a price. The solutions to spam and telemarketing are simple: delete; hang up. Ann Maupin Los Angeles
OPINION
October 1, 2002
There is a simple way to get rid of commercial spam ("State Prosecutors Trying to Delete Spam," Sept. 28). Make it illegal to hire someone to send unsolicited advertising (including political) on behalf of another person or company (kind of like pandering). The advertisers must have their contact information, or some way to sign up (in the case of porn sites) on the spam or they wouldn't be able to make a sale. Hit them with big fines and they'll stop hiring the spammers, who will then go out of business.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
You've got (spam) mail. Several AOL users are complaining on Twitter that their email accounts have been hacked and are being used to send out spam to others. Multiple users have said that their accounts have been affected despite not being used in a long time. Among them is Los Angeles Times Food Editor Russ Parsons. "I've gotten a couple of emails from friends telling me that my AOL account had been hacked and that they were getting spammed by it. The thing is, that account has been closed for at least two years," Parsons said in an email.
WORLD
April 11, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
The Russian government has cut off broadcasts of Voice of America after a leading state media figure denounced the U.S. government-funded radio as "spam on our frequencies. " VOA's contract with the Russian media oversight agency wasn't renewed after it expired at the end of March because the Kremlin could no longer tolerate "its subversive, sanctimonious, self-serving propaganda," the Voice of Russia said in its account of the cutoff. The internal silencing of the broadcasts that beamed news and cultural programs into the Soviet Union during the Cold War represented the latest attempt by the Kremlin to eliminate media providing an alternative to those whose content and editors are controlled by the Russian government.
BUSINESS
March 22, 2014 | By Chris O'Brien
To keep an eye on his child via his smartphone, Marc Gilbert installed Internet-connected video baby monitors in his home in Houston. One evening, Gilbert heard a stranger's voice bellowing obscenities from the monitor. He disconnected the device after realizing that it had been hacked. "I'm a pretty technical guy, and I thought I knew how all this stuff should be hooked up," said Gilbert, who has written several letters to his congressman and other elected officials, trying to bring the security issue to their attention.
BUSINESS
February 5, 2014 | By Stuart Pfeifer
A Wisconsin man has agreed to pay $10,000 to settle Federal Trade Commission allegations that he sent millions of unwanted and misleading text messages to consumers with bogus offers of "free" gift cards and electronics. The FTC had accused Jason Q. Cruz of West Bend, Wisc., of sending texts that offered $1,000 gift cards to major retailers or free iPads to those who clicked on links in the messages. A typical message read, “You have been selected for a $1,000 Walmart GiftCard, Enter code 'FREE' ... to claim your prize: 161 left!
BUSINESS
January 29, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Google has sent a notice to some users of its Gmail service letting them know a recent bug may have caused some of their messages to be incorrectly categorized. The bug occurred when users deleted emails or marked certain emails as spam. Gmail would apply those actions to messages other than the ones users were trying to delete or send to their spam folder. Google said the error occurred from Jan. 15 to Jan. 22 and has since been fixed. PHOTOS: Google unveils new Glass frames "We encourage you to check your Trash and Spam folders before Feb. 14 for any items you did not intend to delete or mark as spam and move them back to your inbox," the notice said.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Snapchat has apologized for an excessive amount of spam that some users have been receiving lately. The Los Angeles start-up, which lets users send each other picture and video messages that vanish seconds after users open them, said its team is working to reduce the spam. "While we expect to minimize spam, it is the consequence of a quickly growing service," Snapchat said in a blog .  PHOTOS: Top 10 tech gadgets we want to see in 2014 Snapchat said it does not believe the increased spam is a result of a recent data compromise, which exposed the usernames and phone numbers of millions of users.
OPINION
May 10, 2003
Re "Put a Lid on Spam," editorial, May 1: Though you hit the nail on the head in terms of identifying the problem, I'm sorry to say your recipe for a spam solution will only serve to fall in line with the America Online and Microsoft goal to legitimize spam as an acceptable means of advertising. For openers, California doesn't need to follow Virginia's lead when it comes to creating a tough "opt-out" law on spam -- we created a similar law in 1998. The fundamental problem with the "opt-out" approach is that every spammer gets to send the first slice free.
BUSINESS
January 3, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Lunch meat purveyor Hormel Foods is making a run at the supermarket's middle aisles, buying the Skippy peanut butter brand for about $700 million. The Austin, Minn., company, also known for its Spam canned ham, is acquiring Skippy from Unilever's U.S. operation, which also owns brands such as Vaseline and I Can't Believe It's Not Butter! Hormel, whose main strength is its domestic sales of Jennie-O, Farmer John and other lunch meats, is trying to expand its portfolio of products and boost its presence overseas.
BUSINESS
November 14, 2013 | By David Lazarus
Kyle says he receives a lot of unwanted email from his cable provider, Time Warner Cable. He also says the company appears to be sending him email from other companies. Kyle's question: Is my cable company a spammer? ASK LAZ: Smart answers to consumer questions And the answer is: Yup. Although Time Warner Cable would characterize it instead as notifying customers about goods and services in which they may be interested. What can you do about it? Check out the surprising process in today's Ask Laz video.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory on Tuesday said it planned to appeal a National Labor Relations Board judge's order to rescind disciplinary actions against five engineers and scientists. "Caltech respectfully disagrees with the decision and intends to appeal," JPL spokeswoman Veronica McGregor said in a brief statement. Administrative Law Judge William G. Kocol had ordered JPL, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology for NASA, to remove disciplinary letters from the employee files of the five.
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