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BUSINESS
April 7, 2011 | By Pete Carey
Interested in a free iPad like the one your Facebook friend got by filling out a survey? Curious about that "friend" request from someone you don't know? Don't click — it's spam, or worse. Such attacks, long common with email, are now migrating to social media. And Facebook, with its 500 million users, is the biggest target of all. "It's a spammer's dream," said Kurt Roemer, chief security strategist for software company Citrix Systems. "You have all your friends, business connections, who you do banking with, who you travel with — all kinds of aspects of your life.
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BUSINESS
April 22, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
AOL Mail has changed its policies to prevent spammers from sending messages out of addresses that are made to look like real AOL email accounts. The company announced the change Tuesday afternoon after numerous users took to Twitter to complain that their accounts were being used to send spam and that changing their passwords was not resolving the issue. Some users complained that spam was being sent from AOL accounts that had been deleted. That was possible because the spam messages were not being sent from users' actual accounts.
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BUSINESS
March 8, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
A staple of the spammer's arsenal -- those come-ons for job offers -- is getting a makeover because of the recession as online identity thieves concoct clever new ways to sneak into people's computers. One tactic the bad guys are trying is a twist on an old standby: e-mails purporting to come from legitimate companies that say they're still hiring. The messages are loaded with links to the company's official website to throw off suspicious recipients but are packed with a dangerous surprise -- a computer virus -- hidden in an attachment that is supposed to be a job application.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
LinkedIn wants to give its mobile app a spark, and the social network is doing so by simplifying and customizing it to individually fit each of its users. The business-focused social network rolled out the major app update late Wednesday night. The updated app features an overhauled design and minimized build that's intended to let users access as many features as possible with as few finger taps as necessary. "We designed with one key core principle in mind: having all the stuff you care about one tap away from you," said Tomer Cohen, a LinkedIn senior product manager and mobile phone lead.
OPINION
April 26, 2003
Although I wholeheartedly concur with Jonathan Turley's disdain for spam e-mail (Commentary, April 21), I don't believe legislation banning spam would be practical or effective without cutting off the money trail. Almost every purchase resulting from spam solicitation, whether for porn, virility enhancement pills or bogus software, is paid for with a credit card. As spammers live in the "etherland," with no geographic location, receiving payments in the form of checks or cash isn't an option for them.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
AOL Mail has changed its policies to prevent spammers from sending messages out of addresses that are made to look like real AOL email accounts. The company announced the change Tuesday afternoon after numerous users took to Twitter to complain that their accounts were being used to send spam and that changing their passwords was not resolving the issue. Some users complained that spam was being sent from AOL accounts that had been deleted. That was possible because the spam messages were not being sent from users' actual accounts.
OPINION
January 1, 2004
Re "You Might Be Infected -- With an Urban Legend," Commentary, Nov. 28: Andrew Noymer's article on urban legends touches only the tip of the iceberg. The Internet has probably spread more urban legends than any other source. It seems like every time one of my friends discovers "e-mail" I am again warned about a (nonexistent) computer virus, making money by forwarding e-mails from Microsoft, "missing" children and, yes, even the cookie recipe. I know these people think they're being helpful, but what they're really doing, aside from passing on false rumors, is spreading lists of valid e-mail addresses (the recipients)
BUSINESS
April 18, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
LinkedIn wants to give its mobile app a spark, and the social network is doing so by simplifying and customizing it to individually fit each of its users. The business-focused social network rolled out the major app update late Wednesday night. The updated app features an overhauled design and minimized build that's intended to let users access as many features as possible with as few finger taps as necessary. "We designed with one key core principle in mind: having all the stuff you care about one tap away from you," said Tomer Cohen, a LinkedIn senior product manager and mobile phone lead.
BUSINESS
June 11, 2004 | From Reuters
Microsoft Corp. has filed eight lawsuits against spammers, saying that they deceived consumers and used false information to hide their tracks, the world's largest software maker said. The lawsuits are the latest salvo in the Redmond, Wash.-based company's war to eradicate unsolicited e-mails, which have clogged countless inboxes on personal computers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1999 | JERRY HICKS
This scam went nationwide by e-mail; maybe it came to your computer: You're told the merchandise you ordered is en route and payment (several hundred dollars) will be automatically charged to your credit card. But if you don't want the merchandise, just call this phone number to cancel. The scammers had no way of hitting on your credit card: Once you learned you've been charged a fee for the callback, you know you've been had. There's a new dirty word for such a scam. It's called Spam.
BUSINESS
April 17, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
If you've received an email about the Boston bombings, do not click on the link. A spam-monitoring lab at the University of Alabama at Birmingham says a new malware campaign targeting Windows computers is sending out an "unprecedented" amount of spam emails. If users open the email and click on the link inside, the malware will infect their computers. “The volumes are just astronomical,” said Gary Warner , a cyber researcher with UAB's Computer Research Forensics Lab. PHOTOS: The top smartphones of 2013 The lab looks for spam that can result in users' computers becoming infected, Warner said.
WORLD
July 21, 2012 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
NEW DELHI - A few years ago, Ankur Suri saw a friend beaten up by fellow classmates after he emailed pornography to female friends - or rather, his computer had. In desperation, the friend went to authorities, who declined to investigate because they didn't really understand the problem of how his computer had been infected by malicious spam. "I'd rather go to Google or Facebook than deal with the Indian law," said Suri, 25. India recently notched a dubious distinction, beating the U.S. to become the leading spewer of spam email, according to the British Internet security firm Sophos Ltd. Nearly 10% of such emails is now sent from Indian computers, up from 7% in 2010, and many of the spammers don't even realize they're doing it. "This is one record India doesn't want so much," said Sanjay Katkar, chief technology officer with Quick Heal, a security firm.
BUSINESS
April 7, 2011 | By Pete Carey
Interested in a free iPad like the one your Facebook friend got by filling out a survey? Curious about that "friend" request from someone you don't know? Don't click — it's spam, or worse. Such attacks, long common with email, are now migrating to social media. And Facebook, with its 500 million users, is the biggest target of all. "It's a spammer's dream," said Kurt Roemer, chief security strategist for software company Citrix Systems. "You have all your friends, business connections, who you do banking with, who you travel with — all kinds of aspects of your life.
BUSINESS
October 31, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Facebook Inc., the world's most popular social-networking website, was awarded $711 million in damages against a spammer who gained access to users' accounts and sent phony messages. Sanford Wallace sent unsolicited mass e-mails to users, tricking many of them into divulging their log-in information or redirecting them to websites that paid him for each visit, Facebook claimed in a lawsuit. "Wallace willfully violated the statutes in question with blatant disregard for the rights of Facebook users whose accounts were compromised by his conduct," U.S. District Judge Jeremy Fogel in San Jose said in a court order.
BUSINESS
September 23, 2009 | DAVID LAZARUS
It's the sort of spam that gets your attention: An e-mail showing a topless woman offering drugs that promise to enhance a man's sexual prowess, illustrated with very naughty before-and-after photos. The first such e-mail, ostensibly from a Canadian pharmacy, arrived in Beverly Hills resident Tom Hayostek's AOL inbox in July. He ignored it, figuring that would prompt the spammer to go elsewhere. It didn't. Since then, Hayostek, 51, said he's received multiple versions of the spam every day -- more than 200 so far. The latest batch arrived Tuesday morning.
BUSINESS
March 8, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
A staple of the spammer's arsenal -- those come-ons for job offers -- is getting a makeover because of the recession as online identity thieves concoct clever new ways to sneak into people's computers. One tactic the bad guys are trying is a twist on an old standby: e-mails purporting to come from legitimate companies that say they're still hiring. The messages are loaded with links to the company's official website to throw off suspicious recipients but are packed with a dangerous surprise -- a computer virus -- hidden in an attachment that is supposed to be a job application.
OPINION
August 15, 2002 | NORAH VINCENT, Norah Vincent is a senior fellow at the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies, a think tank set up after Sept. 11 to study terrorism.
Spam has been a part of our lives for years. But lately, the scourge of unsolicited commercial e-mail, or UCE as it is known among activists and the organized fed-up, has reached epidemic proportions--and we, the afflicted, are starting to lose it. Why has it gotten so much worse, and what can we do about it? Filtering software isn't working.
NEWS
January 17, 2002 | DAVE WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Question: I'm running Windows 2000 Pro. When I use the Block Sender command, it does not block the sender. Apparently the From designation on the spam message is not where it's actually from, rendering the Block Sender command meaningless. Is there a way to determine the true From designation and block it? Answer: The short answer is no. But it's a little more complicated than that.
BUSINESS
June 11, 2008 | Joseph Menn, Times Staff Writer
Cyber-crime pays. But selling counterfeit drugs apparently pays better. Some of the world's most prolific spammers used to tout products for a few pennies per million e-mails or con consumers into forking over credit card information. But these groups have found that the most profit and growth potential lies in actually shipping the fake Viagra and other products they're hawking, according to a study scheduled for release today by a top security researcher.
BUSINESS
May 28, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Yahoo Inc. has filed a lawsuit against an unknown group of defendants it alleges tricked consumers into thinking they won a lottery or prize offered by the Internet company. Yahoo filed the suit May 16 in U.S. District Court in New York under federal trademark law, federal anti-spam law and other state laws. In its court filing, Yahoo contends that the defendants masqueraded as the Internet company, sending out e-mails telling recipients they had won prizes ranging from a few thousand to a million dollars and instructing them to click on a link or forward personal information to a "lottery coordinator" to get their prize.
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