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Spanish American War

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NATIONAL
April 25, 2012 | By John M. Glionna
For nearly a century, the Spanish-American War relic sat near an entrance to an elementary school in Deadwood, S.D. -- a shell from the battleship Maine showing students that history still lived among them. But recently, jittery city officials began asking themselves a question about the bomb: What if that thing is live? The question launched the South Dakota community into a frenzy of research that included calling in the explosives squad at nearby Ellsworth Air Force Base, who tested the ordnance -- and found that it was indeed a dud. But not before the community had a few tense moments.
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TRAVEL
April 11, 2014 | By Alice Short
CHARLESTON, S.C. - Two of the top destinations on a recent trip to Charleston - Ft. Sumter and the Confederacy's H. L. Hunley submarine - transcend the label of "Civil War attraction. " These sites appeal to students of U.S. history, to devotees of military archives and to those who value peace over war. After a 30-minute ferry trip from the city to the man-made island that is the site of Ft. Sumter, my tour group encountered park ranger Dennis Birr, who proved to be a combination of historian, carnival barker and motivational speaker.
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NEWS
February 13, 1986 | WILLIAM S. MURPHY, Murphy is a Times photographer
Veterans of the Spanish-American War now number fewer than a squad. Today there are only 10 men in the United States who were among the thousands answering President William McKinley's call for volunteers in 1898. If these survivors could muster on a parade ground, answering the roll call would be: Jaspar Garrison, 106, and S. Leroy Mandel, 102, from Illinois; Harry Embree, 106, from Kansas; Ralph W. Taylor, 104, and Wilson L. Dawson, 101, from Florida; Jesse A.
BUSINESS
March 19, 2013 | By Shan Li
The U.S. government is paying billions to war veterans and their families, including monthly payments to the children of Civil War veterans. More than $40 billion annually is being paid out to soldiers and survivors of the Civil War, the Spanish-American War in 1898, both World Wars, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, the Gulf War, the Iraq war and the war in Afghanistan, according to an analysis by the Associated Press. Two children of Civil War veterans -- one in Tennessee and the other in North Carolina -- are each receiving $876 a year.
BOOKS
February 22, 1998 | THEODORE DRAPER, Theodore Draper is the author of numerous books, including "A Struggle for Power: The American Revolution." Winner of the American Historical Assn.'s 1990 Herbert Feis Award for Nonacademically Affiliated Historians, he is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences
The Spanish-American War of 1898 was the shortest and easiest of all American wars. It has not been a favorite American war--nothing like the Revolution or the Civil War, which for one thing did not take territory from other countries. In some ways, the war with Spain resembled the war with Mexico of the 1840s that lasted much longer and brought in far more territory.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 2001
Most historians tell us that upward of 6,000 Americans died at Antietam, not the 4,800 suggested in your Sept. 13 editorial, "Invisible Changes." The casualties at Antietam numbered more than double the total killed in the War of 1812, the Mexican War and the Spanish-American War combined. It was also four times the total of Americans who lost their lives on June 6, 1944, storming the beaches at Normandy. Who knows what dreadful comparisons will now be added to the historical record. Ronald Rubin Topanga
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1992
The recently televised debut of "The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles" was quite entertaining but flawed historically. The cavalry troops serving under Gen. John J. Pershing were black, not white. My stepfather, Victor Humphries, soldiered in the famous punitive incursion into Mexico and was wounded in the campaign. Pershing was not called Black Jack because of the hue of his hair or the shade of his horse but for the color of his cavalrymen. MICHAEL WIMBERLY Glendale Pershing was nicknamed Black Jack when he fought with the black 10th Cavalry Regiment in Cuba in the Spanish-American War.
NEWS
May 25, 1992 | Jerry Hicks and Donnette Dunbar and Janice Jones
MAIN HEROES: The county has numerous war memorials but the oldest, and perhaps the most serene, is the Spanish-American War tribute, above, overlooking the lake at Irvine Regional Park. Sitting behind a Civil War howitzer, the stone memorial was dedicated in 1926 to the 113 men of Company L, volunteer infantry out of Santa Ana. Also included is a plaque made of metal from the U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1992
The recently televised debut of "The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles" was quite entertaining but flawed historically. The cavalry troops serving under Gen. John J. Pershing were black, not white. My stepfather, Victor Humphries, soldiered in the famous punitive incursion into Mexico and was wounded in the campaign. Pershing was not called Black Jack because of the hue of his hair or the shade of his horse but for the color of his cavalrymen. MICHAEL WIMBERLY Glendale Pershing was nicknamed Black Jack when he fought with the black 10th Cavalry Regiment in Cuba in the Spanish-American War.
NEWS
July 16, 1988 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
S. Leroy Mendel, whose mother agreed to let him go off to the Spanish-American War even though he was only 17 but whose regulations-conscious superiors didn't and forced him to spend that long-ago conflict in a Texas Army camp, is dead. The former private and the nation's oldest veteran was 104 when he died in his sleep Wednesday in Galva, Ill. The Ft. Worth, Tex., native was only 14 when the U.S. battleship Maine was sunk on June 23, 1898, in Havana Harbor, Cuba, then a Spanish port.
NATIONAL
April 25, 2012 | By John M. Glionna
For nearly a century, the Spanish-American War relic sat near an entrance to an elementary school in Deadwood, S.D. -- a shell from the battleship Maine showing students that history still lived among them. But recently, jittery city officials began asking themselves a question about the bomb: What if that thing is live? The question launched the South Dakota community into a frenzy of research that included calling in the explosives squad at nearby Ellsworth Air Force Base, who tested the ordnance -- and found that it was indeed a dud. But not before the community had a few tense moments.
OPINION
July 27, 2008
Re "Evidence on terror suspect barred," July 22 Please stop referring to waterboarding as "the sensation of drowning" and characterizing it as "tantamount to torture." Waterboarding is drowning that is halted before death. There is nothing simulated about it. It would be more accurate to call it "forced partial drowning." Historically, waterboarding has always been seen as torture. The United States successfully prosecuted waterboarding as a war crime following World War II, and it court-martialed U.S. soldiers for using the "water cure" during the occupation of the Philippines following the Spanish-American War. The claim that waterboarding is not torture, or even that it is "tantamount" to torture, is a position taken by people who want to be able to do it. It is irresponsible for journalists to parrot this counter-factual, ahistorical position on waterboarding as objective fact.
BUSINESS
June 11, 2006 | Kathy M. Kristof, Times Staff Writer
It may be time for big talkers to start pulling out their phone records. An obscure federal tax on long-distance telephone service, imposed in the late 1800s to fund the Spanish-American War, is finally being phased out because of court challenges. The result: Millions of customers are due refunds for taxes that they've paid in the last three years. "Everybody is going to have an interest in this," said Eric Smith, a spokesman for the Internal Revenue Service.
NATIONAL
May 21, 2005 | James Rainey, Times Staff Writer
Americans had never seen anything like the photographs from the battlefield at Antietam. A critic for the New York Times said the unflinching images of the dead defied "the public's long nurtured belief that death on the battlefield was glorious and heroic." Alexander Gardner's Civil War photos became iconic markers of sacrifice and suffering for later generations. But they had limited reach in their day.
OPINION
July 20, 2003 | Frank Gibney, Frank Gibney, professor of politics at Pomona College, is president of the Pacific Basin Institute. He is the author of "The Pacific Century," "Five Gentlemen of Japan" and other books on Asia.
"A splendid little war," the secretary of State called the brief, victorious action. "Benevolent assimilation" was the name of the White House policy that guided U.S. occupation forces. "It should be the earnest and paramount aim of the military administration," the president wrote, "to win the confidence, respect and affection of the inhabitants ... by assuring them in every possible way [the] full measure of individual rights and liberties which is the heritage of a free people ...
OPINION
May 21, 2003
Re "Saving Private Lynch: Take 2," Commentary, May 20: I was absolutely dismayed to find that the BBC story to which Robert Scheer refers was released earlier this month. Why, then, was this the first I heard of it? My daily news sources include CNN, MSNBC, AOL, The Times, various weekly news magazines and, of course, "trash news" and assorted talking heads. If true, this BBC story portrays a very cynical manipulation of the facts, the American press corps and the American people. In addition, it represents a rather curious hijacking of the U.S. taxpayer money needed to mount this production.
NEWS
July 31, 1990 | Associated Press
The nation's oldest known war veteran, George E. Echols, died last week at 105, the Department of Veterans Affairs said Monday. Echols, who served in World War I, died Thursday at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center here after a brief illness. Echols, who was born in Athens, Ga., served with the Army in France. His death means that the oldest war veteran now is Nathan E. Cook, 104, who is also the only known living veteran of the Spanish-American War.
NEWS
November 23, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A research team using a robot diving vehicle announced in St. Petersburg, Fla., that it has found the wreckage of the battleship Maine three miles off the coast of Havana and two-thirds of a mile down. In 1898, the American warship, resting in Havana Harbor, blew up and sank, claiming the lives of 266 sailors. The nature of the explosion was never determined, but U.S. officials and the media blamed Spain and used that as a reason to foment the Spanish-American War.
OPINION
March 2, 2003
Re "Protesters With Bloody Hands," Commentary, Feb. 27: Max Boot's warped view of democratic protest springs in part from his misreading of history. Protest against the Spanish-American War in 1898 (the loudest and brashest of which came from Andrew Carnegie) went unheeded. Moreover, the victory over Spain, and not any peace movements, launched two decades of imperialistic and bloody counterrevolutionary warfare in Latin America. Boot's problems do not end there. In a callous exercise of counterfactual argument, he asserts that if the U.S. had entered World War I earlier it would have ended earlier.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 2001
Most historians tell us that upward of 6,000 Americans died at Antietam, not the 4,800 suggested in your Sept. 13 editorial, "Invisible Changes." The casualties at Antietam numbered more than double the total killed in the War of 1812, the Mexican War and the Spanish-American War combined. It was also four times the total of Americans who lost their lives on June 6, 1944, storming the beaches at Normandy. Who knows what dreadful comparisons will now be added to the historical record. Ronald Rubin Topanga
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