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ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2003 | Steve Carney, Special to The Times
Wednesday was a champagne day at Spanish Broadcasting System Inc., its local programming executive said, as the company was perhaps the biggest winner when the spring Arbitron ratings were released. Not only did its Mexican regional music station, KLAX-FM (97.9), shoot up from 11th to sixth place, tying rival and longtime ratings leader KSCA-FM (101.9), but the company also saw big gains at the tropical music station, KZAB-FM (93.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2014 | By Meg James
Ricardo Sanchez, the No. 1 morning radio personality in Los Angeles until he was abruptly sidelined last fall, has switched stations. Sanchez -- who goes by the nickname "El Mandril" -- announced this week in a Facebook post that he has joined a new radio station in Los Angeles, KXOS FM 93.9, and would begin broadcasting there on Monday. The station KXOS is part-owned and managed by the Mexico City broadcasting company Grupo Radio Centro. FACES TO WATCH 2014: Digital media "First I achieved the American dream of having success in the United States, and now I can achieve the Mexican dream of triumphing with the strongest radio company in Mexico," Sanchez wrote in Spanish in his Facebook message.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1988 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
KNOB-FM, an Orange County adult contemporary music station purchased last December by the Spanish Broadcasting System, has been transformed into KSKQ-FM 98, an all-Spanish contemporary and international music station. SBS also owns KSKQ-AM (1540), which has been broadcasting a similar Spanish music and news format since 1984. The new 80,000 watt FM station, which SBS purchased for $15 million, will be programmed to attract a younger audience, said Raul Alarcon Sr., SBS board chairman.
BUSINESS
October 6, 2004 | From Reuters
Viacom Inc. said it would sell a radio station to Spanish Broadcasting System Inc. for a 10% stake in SBS, marking Viacom's entry into the U.S. Latino radio market. The move is a key step for Viacom toward offsetting slowing advertising revenue growth from English-language radio stations. Viacom, which runs Spanish versions of its MTV music television channel and its Nickelodeon channel for children, lost a bidding war last year with General Electric Co.'
BUSINESS
October 6, 2004 | From Reuters
Viacom Inc. said it would sell a radio station to Spanish Broadcasting System Inc. for a 10% stake in SBS, marking Viacom's entry into the U.S. Latino radio market. The move is a key step for Viacom toward offsetting slowing advertising revenue growth from English-language radio stations. Viacom, which runs Spanish versions of its MTV music television channel and its Nickelodeon channel for children, lost a bidding war last year with General Electric Co.'
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2014 | By Meg James
Ricardo Sanchez, the No. 1 morning radio personality in Los Angeles until he was abruptly sidelined last fall, has switched stations. Sanchez -- who goes by the nickname "El Mandril" -- announced this week in a Facebook post that he has joined a new radio station in Los Angeles, KXOS FM 93.9, and would begin broadcasting there on Monday. The station KXOS is part-owned and managed by the Mexico City broadcasting company Grupo Radio Centro. FACES TO WATCH 2014: Digital media "First I achieved the American dream of having success in the United States, and now I can achieve the Mexican dream of triumphing with the strongest radio company in Mexico," Sanchez wrote in Spanish in his Facebook message.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2003 | Steve Carney, Special to The Times
The programming from one of the oldest radio stations in Los Angeles ends tonight after nearly eight decades, replaced by a format that reflects the Southland's fastest-growing audience. At midnight, KFSG-FM (93.5), which went on the air Feb. 6, 1924, as a service of the International Church of the Foursquare Gospel, will cease its Christian music and talk and begin offering Spanish-language music from its current operator, Spanish Broadcasting System.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2003 | Steve Carney, Special to The Times
Last week, when KMXN-FM (94.3) in Orange County abandoned its alternative music format, a few listeners certainly lost their favorite station. But by changing to Spanish-language country and hip-hop, it has the potential to attract hundreds of thousands more. More than a year ago, Walter Ulloa, chairman and chief executive of Entravision Communications Corp.
BUSINESS
November 22, 2002 | Jeff Leeds
Four of the largest Spanish-language radio broadcasters called on Arbitron Inc. to reform its measurements, saying the ratings service badly undercounts their audience. Hispanic Broadcasting Corp., Spanish Broadcasting System Inc., Entravision Communications Corp. and Radio Unica Communications Corp. said Arbitron should set a timeline for when it would begin weighting its audience samples according to listeners' language preference.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2006
Evangelist Aimee Semple McPherson's 500-watt radio station KFSG -- which stood for Kall Four Square Gospel, after her International Church of the Foursquare Gospel -- made its debut at the newly built Angelus Temple in Echo Park. Each morning, Sister Aimee broadcast "The Sunshine Hour," spreading her upbeat spiritualism -- a blend of entertainment, religious faith and boosterism. From the Jazz Age to World War II, McPherson was as famous and popular as any movie star.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2003 | Steve Carney, Special to The Times
Wednesday was a champagne day at Spanish Broadcasting System Inc., its local programming executive said, as the company was perhaps the biggest winner when the spring Arbitron ratings were released. Not only did its Mexican regional music station, KLAX-FM (97.9), shoot up from 11th to sixth place, tying rival and longtime ratings leader KSCA-FM (101.9), but the company also saw big gains at the tropical music station, KZAB-FM (93.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2003 | Steve Carney, Special to The Times
The programming from one of the oldest radio stations in Los Angeles ends tonight after nearly eight decades, replaced by a format that reflects the Southland's fastest-growing audience. At midnight, KFSG-FM (93.5), which went on the air Feb. 6, 1924, as a service of the International Church of the Foursquare Gospel, will cease its Christian music and talk and begin offering Spanish-language music from its current operator, Spanish Broadcasting System.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2003 | Steve Carney, Special to The Times
Last week, when KMXN-FM (94.3) in Orange County abandoned its alternative music format, a few listeners certainly lost their favorite station. But by changing to Spanish-language country and hip-hop, it has the potential to attract hundreds of thousands more. More than a year ago, Walter Ulloa, chairman and chief executive of Entravision Communications Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1988 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
KNOB-FM, an Orange County adult contemporary music station purchased last December by the Spanish Broadcasting System, has been transformed into KSKQ-FM 98, an all-Spanish contemporary and international music station. SBS also owns KSKQ-AM (1540), which has been broadcasting a similar Spanish music and news format since 1984. The new 80,000 watt FM station, which SBS purchased for $15 million, will be programmed to attract a younger audience, said Raul Alarcon Sr., SBS board chairman.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2002 | Reuters
Spanish Broadcasting System Inc. posted a profit after a string of losses as revenue rose 12.6% boosted by higher ratings and growing interest from advertisers in reaching the Latino audience. The company, the second-largest U.S. Spanish-language radio broadcaster, earned $12.82 million, or 20 cents a share, in the second quarter, compared with a loss of $2.4 million, or 4 cents, a year ago. Spanish Broadcasting is in a legal battle with Clear Channel Communications Inc.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2005 | Martin Miller, Times Staff Writer
Gary Soto finally found a radio station that speaks his language -- both of them. In the classrooms of Los Angeles Community College and at his part-time job slinging fruit drinks at Jamba Juice, the 19-year-old American-born son of Mexican immigrants talks primarily in English. But when hanging out with friends, his English comes and goes in favor of Spanish, which is what he speaks almost exclusively with his parents.
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