Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSpanish Civil War
IN THE NEWS

Spanish Civil War

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
May 16, 2010
For years, conservatives in Spain bristled as their most famous magistrate, Baltasar Garzon, pushed the boundaries of international law against former Chilean dictator Gen. Augusto Pinochet and human rights abusers in other countries, but they were powerless to stop him. When Spain's star judge turned his sights on Spanish Civil War atrocities, however, they joined forces with his many personal enemies and went after him, accusing him of opening old...
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
January 10, 2013 | By Michael Kinsley
The most famous painting of the 20th century, Picasso's "Guernica," commemorates the 1937 bombing of this small Spanish town by the German air force, in support of Gen. Francisco Franco's fascists in the Spanish Civil War. Hard to believe, but this was history's first extensive bombing of a civilian population. In his book "Postwar," historian Tony Judt pointed out that more civilians died in World War II, of various causes, than did soldiers. That was not true of World War I or of most earlier conflicts.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 17, 1998
Richard Cloke, 82, a former member of the Abraham Lincoln Brigade, the force of Americans that fought in the Spanish Civil War. Cloke, a machine gunner, was wounded, and the shrapnel remained in his leg for life. After the war, he returned to California and finished his undergraduate work at UC Berkeley, but like many other members of the brigade, found himself blacklisted during the McCarthy era. He made his living as a jack of all trades, mainly in the San Fernando Valley.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2012 | By Chris Lee
Nicole Kidman scored a pair of Golden Globe nominations Thursday for two divergent performances that showcase the Oscar winner's versatility and willingness to tackle challenging - even potentially degrading - roles in the name of drama. Drafting on her dual Screen Actors Guild award nominations Wednesday, Kidman scored a Golden Globe nod for best performance by an actress in a supporting role in a motion picture for her turn as a hot-to-trot Southern belle in “The Paperboy” and one for best performance by an actress in a mini-series or motion picture made for television portraying a war correspondent in the HBO biopic “Hemingway & Gellhorn.” In director Lee Daniels' “The Paperboy,” which divided critics when it debuted at the Cannes Film Festival and has grossed less than $700,000 at the box office, Kidman plays a sexed-up Southern Barbie with a beehive bouffant and a penchant for steamy correspondence with prison inmates.
NEWS
March 27, 1996
Norman Perlman, 86, who fought with the Abraham Lincoln Brigade in Spain. Perlman was a member of the international volunteer group that fought against fascist forces in the Spanish Civil War in 1936. He was wounded by German shrapnel in the fighting and lost a leg. In later years, Perlman served as secretary-treasurer of the Los Angeles post of the brigade's veterans.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2012 | By Nick Owchar, Los Angeles Times
Juliet Barker's lives of the Brontës may be a doorstopper, but it's hardly the only one this season resisting quick consumption. The following three tomes don't beg so much as wallop you on the head with their sheer size. Winter of the World Book Two of the Century Trilogy Ken Follett Dutton: 941 pp., $36 The medium-sized thriller "Eye of the Needle," published back at the start of Follett's career in the late 1970s, was a red herring. Since then, Follett has served up expansive epics like "The Pillars of the Earth" and "World Without End," which embrace the medieval world, and "The Century Trilogy," which chronicles the lives of five families in times of social and historical tumult.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2012 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
HBO's two-for-one biopic "Hemingway & Gellhorn," which would more appropriately reverse the order of those names, dramatizes the stormy coming together and falling apart of the famous novelist and his third wife, war correspondent Martha Gellhorn. The film, which premieres Monday, is a big-name affair, with Clive Owen and Nicole Kidman in the leads and Philip Kaufman directing a screenplay by Barbara Turner ("Pollock") and Jerry Stahl ("Bad Boys II"). But - though it is clearly based on research, with dialogue that scavenges the principals' own writing - it is never quite believable, either as history or drama.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2011 | By Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
Where a hot dog stand now is the main lunchtime option for city workers in this distressed Bay Area town, soon they'll be able to choose from steel-cut oatmeal, goat cheese empanadas and white bean and kale stew, prepared in a mobile cafe. Its owners will share in the decision-making — and any profits. Richmond Solar has trained needy residents to work as green-energy installers and now aims to transform some into bosses by forming a worker-owned cooperative. The city's first bicycle shop has opened with similar dreams: Young men who have volunteered to learn the repair trade soon may be elevated to co-owners.
NEWS
March 9, 2011 | By Susan James, Special to The Times
The Tate Modern Art Museum in London, which opened in 2000 in a onetime power station, will open a major exhibition of the work of Spanish artist Joan MirÃ?³, called the father of Abstract Expressionism, on April 14. The show, featuring more than 150 works, is one of the most extensive shows ever dedicated to this  20th century artist and the first in London in half a century. The exhibition, "The Ladder of Escape,"  features rarely seen pieces that signpost the stages of MirÃ?
OPINION
October 30, 2010 | Patt Morrison
It's a pity, really, that the word " horror" is so elastic that it extends to gore-and-torture movies, which should be rated by blood type, and also to the phantasmagorical films of Guillermo del Toro. The Mexican-born filmmaker/writer/producer, who made his bones in special-effects makeup, crafts elegant and poignant monsters of complex character in movies such as "Pan's Labyrinth," and unleashes creatures of unexpected heart as well as fearsome mien in the "Hellboy" series. In the last few years, he's added writer of novels to his list of job titles.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2010 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Physics of Imaginary Objects Tina May Hall University of Pittsburgh Press: 160 pp., $24.95 In hard times, as you well know, fewer risks are taken when it comes to potential profit and potential loss. In the publishing world, this means less experimental fiction published by large houses. It also means an upwelling of creative new houses and imprints that publish raw experiments with language. Tina May Hall's pungent writing breaks down walls between poetry and prose, narrator and reader, humor and horror.
WORLD
May 23, 2010 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
Is it a horrible irony or poetic justice? For years, Baltasar Garzon has been Spain's most controversial crusader, a judge on a mission to fight whatever he thinks is an abuse of power wherever he sees it happening. He has used his courtroom here in Madrid to investigate allegations of torture at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to indict Osama bin Laden and, most famously, to go after former Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet. Garzon, 54, is due in court again soon for yet another trial involving an alleged abuse of power.
OPINION
May 16, 2010
For years, conservatives in Spain bristled as their most famous magistrate, Baltasar Garzon, pushed the boundaries of international law against former Chilean dictator Gen. Augusto Pinochet and human rights abusers in other countries, but they were powerless to stop him. When Spain's star judge turned his sights on Spanish Civil War atrocities, however, they joined forces with his many personal enemies and went after him, accusing him of opening old...
Los Angeles Times Articles
|