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Spanish Inquisition

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1990
Pain-compliance is hardly anything new. Law enforcement has been using it effectively since the Spanish Inquisition. While it may be necessary for police to use the nunchaku , it's unfortunate that they appear to enjoy employing it. BILL SERANTONI Thousand Oaks
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
March 27, 2014 | By Henry Chu and Batsheva Sobelman
TOLEDO, Spain - The Jews who flock to the two medieval synagogues in this walled city are tourists, not worshipers. No one of their faith has practiced it in the temples' exquisitely decorated precincts since 1492. That was the year King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella, besides dispatching Christopher Columbus to look for a passage to India, decreed that the Jews of Spain had to either convert to Christianity or quit the country. Many fled - and were robbed, beaten or raped on the way out. Those who stayed faced possible torture and a gruesome death in the Spanish Inquisition.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2003
WOW! I was amazed to read Reed Johnson's review of "The Producers" (" 'Producers' Who Work Too Hard," May 30), since I saw the same production at the Pantages Theatre on May 3. He cites the Mel Brooks musical as being "Borscht Belt-style" and displaying "over-the-top" humor. Please tell me this is not the same Mel Brooks who brought us the artistic flatulence scene from "Blazing Saddles." Or the same Mel Brooks who created the song-and-dance extravaganza to the Spanish Inquisition in "History of the World: Part 1."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013 | By Margaret Gray
In “God's Gypsy,” now at the Lillian Theatre, playwright and performer Coco Blignaut dramatizes the life of St. Teresa of Ávila, the 16th-century Spanish nun known for her ecstatic visions (the most famous starred a handsome angel who pierced her heart with a flaming sword). Targeted by the Spanish Inquisition and accused of blasphemy, hysteria and demonic possession, she nonetheless persevered in reforming the Carmelite order and establishing monasteries around the world.  This world premiere begins with appropriately bliss-inducing original music by violinist/vocalist/composer Lili Haydn (who performed live on opening night)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1986
Researchers who torture and exploit innocent and loving creatures are operating on the arrogant assumption that human beings, because of their superior intelligence, have the right to sacrifice every other form of life on earth. Has the human race really done so well for itself? Have we really made this world a better place? Who created the Spanish Inquisition? Slavery? Terrorism? I say we should revere and appreciate the peaceful and affectionate nature of the animal kingdom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1998 | Religion News Service
In an effort to take a hard look at its past while preparing for the future, the Vatican has opened a symposium on one of its most criticized historical chapters--the Inquisition. "The church cannot cross the threshold of the new millennium without pressing its children to purify themselves in repentance for their errors, infidelity, incoherence and slowness," Cardinal Roger Etchegaray said in his opening remarks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1999
I read with interest "Renewing Jewish Heritage" (Sept. 20). We have just returned from a trip to Portugal and Spain with a study group on Jewish heritage and were fortunate to have been invited to a Sabbath service in Belmonte, Portugal, of Jews who now practice their Judaism openly after surviving nearly 500 years as secret Jews. We also visited Girona, Spain, where the local government is discovering archives about the Jewish population before what they refer to as "the expulsion."
OPINION
November 25, 2005
Re "Heading toward the 'dark side,' " Opinion, Nov. 21 Once again, Vice President Dick Cheney and his, I mean, President Bush's, administration ignore not only sound ethical bases for prohibiting torture, but reality as well: Information gained by torture is not reliable. After all, the Spanish Inquisition uncovered thousands of witches because everyone who was tortured confessed and named other witches, who were then tortured and named other witches, who ... and so on. Those clerics who had the courage to point out the flaw in the system were often tortured and killed themselves.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1991
When I started reading Scruton's article, I began writing it off as just another ignorant and misleading article on the Middle East. However, it soon became apparent that this was more than just some silly man's uninformed views on a topic he knew nothing about. To ascribe terrorism to the religion of Islam, whose meaning is "peace" in Arabic, is as preposterous as ascribing enmity of Christ to Christians. To describe the country of Lebanon's recent political history as a "success" is almost laughable, let alone to ascribe that "success" to Christianity.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1988
In Christon's case for empathy with the fundamentalists' anguish over the assault on the symbol of their faith represented by the "Last Temptation of Christ," he displays a compassion we'd never get from them. And he ignores a vital point. Their sense of violation issues from a concept of Jesus derived from a slavish devotion to the Bible, which they believe contains the ultimate word on everything from human behavior to details on the origin of the cosmos. I find in this unblinking adherence to a single book a fanaticism no less frightening than that engendered by the solitary belief in "Mein Kampf," the dialectics or the medieval Church doctrines that brought us the Crusades and the fun guys of the Spanish Inquisition.
OPINION
May 9, 2009 | James Mandrell, James Mandrell teaches Hispanic studies at Brandeis University, where he chairs the women's and gender studies department.
The release of Bush administration torture memos proves one thing at least: When those at the highest levels of our government discussed "enhanced interrogation," they neglected to consider the sordid history of torture. Had they been interested, they might have discovered an illustrated article on water torture in a popular 19th century Spanish newspaper (I happened on it in Madrid, doing research for my next book).
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2008 | Wendy Smith
The Grand Inquisitor's Manual A History of Terror in the Name of God Jonathan Kirsch HarperOne: 296 pp., $26.95 JONATHAN KIRSCH leaves no doubt about his motive for writing "The Grand Inquisitor's Manual," a scathing account of the Inquisition's 600-year campaign to stifle religious dissent, as well as to persecute various groups of people it branded as alien menaces to communal security. "The Inquisition was and still is a danger to human life and human liberty," he writes.
OPINION
October 2, 2006
Re "Islamism, not Islam, is the foe," Opinion, Sept. 27 Max Boots writes that the prophet Muhammad spread Islam by sword. This is baseless. In several hadith [a narrative], the prophet stated that there is no compulsion in religion. If memory serves me correctly, Christianity didn't always convert people peacefully. Remember the Crusades and the Spanish Inquisition? Weren't Jews and Muslims compelled to convert or die? NABIL ABU SOFAR Rancho Park Boot and many others are correct in stating that whatever our faults, Islamic reaction to our faults is over the top, both the barbaric acts of the extremists and their tolerance by the moderates.
OPINION
November 25, 2005
Re "Heading toward the 'dark side,' " Opinion, Nov. 21 Once again, Vice President Dick Cheney and his, I mean, President Bush's, administration ignore not only sound ethical bases for prohibiting torture, but reality as well: Information gained by torture is not reliable. After all, the Spanish Inquisition uncovered thousands of witches because everyone who was tortured confessed and named other witches, who were then tortured and named other witches, who ... and so on. Those clerics who had the courage to point out the flaw in the system were often tortured and killed themselves.
OPINION
December 2, 2004
I've just finished reading the Nov. 28 editorial, "Chipping Away at Roe vs. Wade." It's frightening in its findings. However, even more frightening are the "hidden" implications. There are some who make no secret of the fact that Roe vs. Wade is only a starting point. Ending legal abortion is not enough. What these zealots want is to have all birth control made illegal. It is a blatant attempt to ram their religious beliefs down the throats of others, something I deeply resent. I give no one the power to force me to accept their religious beliefs.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2003
WOW! I was amazed to read Reed Johnson's review of "The Producers" (" 'Producers' Who Work Too Hard," May 30), since I saw the same production at the Pantages Theatre on May 3. He cites the Mel Brooks musical as being "Borscht Belt-style" and displaying "over-the-top" humor. Please tell me this is not the same Mel Brooks who brought us the artistic flatulence scene from "Blazing Saddles." Or the same Mel Brooks who created the song-and-dance extravaganza to the Spanish Inquisition in "History of the World: Part 1."
OPINION
October 2, 2006
Re "Islamism, not Islam, is the foe," Opinion, Sept. 27 Max Boots writes that the prophet Muhammad spread Islam by sword. This is baseless. In several hadith [a narrative], the prophet stated that there is no compulsion in religion. If memory serves me correctly, Christianity didn't always convert people peacefully. Remember the Crusades and the Spanish Inquisition? Weren't Jews and Muslims compelled to convert or die? NABIL ABU SOFAR Rancho Park Boot and many others are correct in stating that whatever our faults, Islamic reaction to our faults is over the top, both the barbaric acts of the extremists and their tolerance by the moderates.
NEWS
January 2, 1992
Having visited Williamstadt, Curacao, on a Caribbean cruise, I was interested in your feature "Ships of Sorrow," dealing with the expulsion of the Jews from Spain in 1492 (Times, Nov. 14). It's understandable why Spain would celebrate the 500th anniversary of Columbus sailing west to India in 1492 and discovering America. But as "Ships of Sorrow" reports, that same year, "Ferdinand and Isabella ordered the nation's Jews either to convert to Christianity or to leave the country under pain of death."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2000 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eric Idle's career is built on the comedy of the unexpected. But even he never expected the sort of Spanish Inquisition that erupted last fall in London over a flippant remark about his former Monty Python cohorts. "I really don't mind doing Monty Python, providing none of the others are around," Idle had responded to a fan's question published in the London Independent about the comedy troupe's 30th anniversary reunion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1999
I read with interest "Renewing Jewish Heritage" (Sept. 20). We have just returned from a trip to Portugal and Spain with a study group on Jewish heritage and were fortunate to have been invited to a Sabbath service in Belmonte, Portugal, of Jews who now practice their Judaism openly after surviving nearly 500 years as secret Jews. We also visited Girona, Spain, where the local government is discovering archives about the Jewish population before what they refer to as "the expulsion."
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