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Spanish Language Outreach Committee

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1991 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing public mistrust highlighted by the Rodney G. King beating, a top Los Angeles police official on Thursday convened a panel to study sometimes-hostile relations between officers and Spanish-speaking residents in the San Fernando Valley. The 20-member Spanish Language Outreach Committee is the brainchild of Deputy Chief Mark A. Kroeker, who oversees the Los Angeles Police Department's five patrol areas in the Valley.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1991 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing mistrust he said confronted him after the Rodney G. King beating, the San Fernando Valley's top police official on Thursday convened a panel to study often-hostile relations between officers and Spanish-speaking residents. The 20-member Spanish Language Outreach Committee, meeting for the first time in Canoga Park, agreed that fear of authority figures prevents many Latinos from reporting crimes and obtaining police protection, and that language and cultural barriers are partly to blame.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1991 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing mistrust he said confronted him after the Rodney G. King beating, the San Fernando Valley's top police official on Thursday convened a panel to study often-hostile relations between officers and Spanish-speaking residents. The 20-member Spanish Language Outreach Committee, meeting for the first time in Canoga Park, agreed that fear of authority figures prevents many Latinos from reporting crimes and obtaining police protection, and that language and cultural barriers are partly to blame.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1991 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing public mistrust highlighted by the Rodney G. King beating, a top Los Angeles police official on Thursday convened a panel to study sometimes-hostile relations between officers and Spanish-speaking residents in the San Fernando Valley. The 20-member Spanish Language Outreach Committee is the brainchild of Deputy Chief Mark A. Kroeker, who oversees the Los Angeles Police Department's five patrol areas in the Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1996 | DARRELL SATZMAN
In a surprise ceremony, six San Fernando Valley LAPD officers were honored Tuesday by the Latin American Civic Assn. in recognition of their efforts to improve relations between police and the Latino community. The officers believed they were attending a regular monthly meeting of the Spanish Language Outreach Committee at the association's San Fernando offices.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1993
Supporters of a pilot program at the Los Angeles Police Department's Foothill Station in Pacoima that teaches officers Spanish-language skills will recommend that it be implemented Valleywide. Lt. Richard Meraz, a member of the Valley Bureau's Spanish Language Outreach Committee, said he is urging in a report that other divisions start Spanish-language training programs to close the language gap between officers and 300,000 Spanish-speaking Latino residents in the Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1993 | SUSAN BYRNES
They might not be fluent, but 42 officers from the Los Angeles Police Department's Foothill Division can now respond to questions, concerns and eyewitness accounts in Spanish with more than the "no hablo espanol" they used to use. The officers will be honored by the Police Department tonight for completing a 30-week pilot program teaching conversational Spanish through intensive weekly classes and homework assignments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1992 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Officers at the Los Angeles Police Department's Foothill Division hope to start Spanish classes soon in their latest effort to improve relations with residents after last year's police beating of motorist Rodney G. King. Advocates hope private sources will pay for a 30-week crash course in conversational Spanish that would serve as a model for the rest of the department and may evolve into cultural awareness classes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1991 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The San Fernando Valley's top police official announced Friday that he is assigning about three-dozen patrol officers to full-time community relations duty, the latest step in a campaign to boost the Los Angeles Police Department's image after the Rodney G. King beating. Effective Sunday, the program will sharply increase the amount of time police spend with neighborhood groups and merchants, from four days a month to about 20. So far, it will apply only in the Valley, where Deputy Chief Mark A.
NEWS
October 21, 1993 | LESLIE BERGER and JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Deputy Los Angeles Police Chief Mark A. Kroeker, a peacemaker praised for implementing community policing programs and restoring faith in the heavily criticized department, will leave his post as the San Fernando Valley's top cop next week to assume command of LAPD operations in South Los Angeles. In announcing the transfer late Wednesday, Police Chief Willie L.
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