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BUSINESS
May 11, 1993 | JACK SEARLES
Las Noticias de los Tres Condados, a Spanish-language newspaper that covers Ventura, Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo counties, will expand to weekly publication by July, according to its publisher, Daniel Castanon. The paper, established in 1990, now circulates every other Friday. Castanon said he hopes to increase the Santa Barbara-based paper's circulation when it becomes a weekly. He said 12,000 copies are now distributed free.
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BUSINESS
February 8, 2007 | Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writer
Public television will now have its own 24-hour Spanish-language network. V-me, pronounced veh-meh, will be available to people with basic digital cable service, giving Spanish-language viewers an alternative to the popular telenovelas that have made the Univision network popular. V-me will offer viewers programming on such subjects as child care and yoga. It will air a Charlie Rose-like interview show.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2002 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
ESPN is finally playing ball in Spanish. After considering the move for more than three years, the sports network said Monday that it would launch a 24-hour Spanish-language sports channel next year, ESPN Deportes (ESPN Sports). The move taps into one of television's fastest-growing markets: the 10.7 million Latino households in the U.S., a potential viewing audience of more than 35 million.
BUSINESS
August 15, 1991 | CRISTINA LEE
To reach more Orange County Latinos, two Santa Ana hospitals began marketing a Spanish-language physician network and health care membership program this week that will refer Spanish-speaking patients to physicians fluent in Spanish. The hospitals--Doctors Hospital of Santa Ana and Santa Ana Hospital Medical Center--hope to provide non-English-speaking Latinos easier access to health care through a program called Nuestra Familia Medica, which means Our Medical Family.
BUSINESS
July 16, 1998 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spanish-language radio gained substantial market share in Los Angeles and Orange counties in the spring quarter, driven by the top two stations in the market, the Arbitron ratings service reported Wednesday. Spanish adult contemporary music station KLVE-FM (107.5) returned to first place, where it had been for the previous 27 months, and sister station KSCA-FM (101.9), playing Mexican regional music, fell back to second. From April 2 to June 24, the two stations accounted for 12.
NEWS
November 27, 1994 | SIMON ROMERO
In the modest back room of the Cudahy Roman Catholic Church, Salvadoran immigrant Emma Amaya has held sway over the minds of 22 adults two nights a week for the past year: She is teaching them how to read. Under flickering fluorescent lights, amid walls adorned with portraits of a suffering Christ and sermons copied in a child's cursive script, Amaya conducts her Spanish-language literacy class.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1997
KLVE-FM (107.5), the top-ranked radio station in Los Angeles, was honored Saturday as the best Spanish-language station in the nation during closing ceremonies at the National Assn. of Broadcasters Convention in New Orleans. In a vote of broadcasters from Spanish-language stations across the U.S., KLVE was presented with the prestigious Marconi Award. The station was also nominated for best station in any language in a major market.
TRAVEL
January 18, 2004 | James Gilden, Special to The Times
There are more Spanish-speaking users of the Internet in the U.S. than in some Spanish-speaking countries, yet many U.S. websites cater more to customers in those foreign countries. None of the big three online travel agencies -- Expedia, Orbitz and Travelocity -- has Spanish-language functionality on its U.S. site. Expedia, however, has a French-language site for Canadian customers, although those 6.7 million French-speakers are but a fraction of the 28.1 million Spanish-speakers in the U.S.
NATIONAL
April 28, 2006 | From the Associated Press
British music producer Adam Kidron says that when he came up with the idea of a Spanish-language version of the U.S. national anthem, he saw it as an ode to the millions of immigrants seeking a better life. But in the week since Kidron announced the song -- which features artists such as Wyclef Jean, hip-hop star Pitbull and Puerto Rican singers Carlos Ponce and Olga Tanon -- it has been the target of a fierce backlash.
NEWS
May 19, 2001 | DANA CALVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nights of Spanish-language radio float above waves of romantic love songs. The days bob on the choppy waters of salsa, rock en espanol and ranchera. In the early mornings, listeners ride along in musical bliss, sometimes catching a few headlines, or an astrology reading, or scores from big soccer games.
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