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BUSINESS
June 28, 1996 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to shore up its weakness in international news and in cable, Westinghouse/CBS said Thursday that it will buy the world's leading 24-hour Spanish-language cable news channel for an undisclosed sum that sources estimate at less than $25 million. The purchase of Telenoticias from the Spanish broadcaster Telemundo is one of several cable deals CBS has in the works, according to cable industry and Wall Street sources.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1996 | MARIO VALENZUELA and MARIO VALENZUELA, Mario Valenzuela graduated from UCLA and works in community relations
When my family and I came to the U.S. from Chile, my mom and dad worked at the Sheraton Hotel all day; my sister and I were at a child care center. My sister, since she was 2 and I, since I was 4, have been immersed in the English language. For a child, a new language is not difficult to learn if you are being spoken to in English by every adult and peer except your parents. The nursery rhymes, the stories and television were all in English.
BUSINESS
April 15, 1998 | NANCY ZUBIRI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Growing up in his native Cuba, Alexis Torres resorted to putting fake covers on books so he could read literature that wasn't government-approved. "When I was a teenager, you could definitely get arrested" for reading "enemy propaganda" like Peruvian novelist Mario Vargas Llosa's works, Torres said. But that didn't stop him from reading as many books as he could get his hands on. Torres' fascination with books led him to pass up a lucrative law career to open a Spanish-language bookstore.
NEWS
December 31, 1998 | KEVIN BAXTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To newcomers, Southern California can seem like an immense place. This is mainly because it is an immense place. Now, imagine having to negotiate that sprawl without the help of a map. Or at least a map you can understand. That's exactly the challenge many of the area's newest residents have long had to face because few map companies offer their products in any language other than English. Warren Wilson, owner of Thomas Bros.
BUSINESS
May 7, 1997 | KEVIN BAXTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rosa Castiel sighs wearily as she watches her staff file out of their Carson office after another 10-hour day. "We're each doing the work of three people," says the director of operations for Fernandez Publishing, the second subsidiary of a major Mexican publishing house to open a U.S. office. Not that Castiel is complaining, mind you. After all, things are much better than they were just 20 months ago, when her staff didn't even have an office to file out of.
BUSINESS
March 28, 1988 | JESUS SANCHEZ, Times Staff Writer
Last year, Pepsi-Cola held a nationwide contest aimed at Latino consumers. The grand prize winners were to receive $150,000 toward the purchase of a house. In Los Angeles, the contest was promoted primarily in Spanish. But in Albuquerque, N.M., the campaign was advertised mostly in English. Pepsi's reasoning: Most Latinos in Albuquerque had lived in the United States for generations and tended to use more English.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2001 | ELIZABETH JENSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
ABC News has quietly shut down its "World News Tonight with Peter Jennings" simultaneous Spanish-language translation service, saying it was too expensive given that there was little evidence many people were using it. The translation service, available via a TV set's Secondary Audio Program channel, was also provided on occasion for other ABC News programs, including special "Nightline" broadcasts and last year's presidential election coverage.
NEWS
September 15, 1988 | MEG SULLIVAN, Times Staff Writer
A Spanish-language call-in program about crime prevention last week included plenty of criticism of the Oxnard police. One viewer of the cable TV show's debut complained that police officers do nothing about prostitutes and drug dealers on Oxnard Boulevard. Another, whose house on D Street was burglarized twice over a short period, said an officer suggested that the viewer prevent more burglaries by moving.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2003 | Daniel Hernandez, Times Staff Writer
While the mainstream media focused on the eclectic cast of characters running to replace Gov. Gray Davis last week, Los Angeles' Spanish-language daily, La Opinion, led its Monday edition with the banner headline: "Schwarzenegger gave his support to Proposition 187." As "Access Hollywood" and "Entertainment Tonight" replayed clips of Arnold Schwarzenegger's entrance into the race on NBC's "The Tonight Show With Jay Leno," Spanish newscasts were giving the star treatment to another candidate: Lt.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1999 | KEVIN BAXTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trying to define the nation's burgeoning Latino population is a little like trying to describe an elephant: Your opinion will depend largely on what part of it you're looking at. In Miami, for example, the Latino community is predominantly Cuban, middle-aged and politically conservative. In Los Angeles, it's young, Mexican and politically progressive. And let's not even bring up New York.
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