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ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1999 | KEVIN BAXTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A couple of months ago, you could have taken the pulse of Spanish-language radio here by simply putting your eyes on a couple of station billboards. The simple red, white and blue advertisements for adult-contemporary station KLVE-FM (107.5), for example, featured a tasteful photo of singers Enrique Iglesias or Juan Gabriel alongside the station's call letters.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2003 | Ernesto Lechner, Special to The Times
For the past 14 years, Los Angeles-based rock en espanol entrepreneur Tomas Cookman has championed the music that he passionately believes in, dreaming of the day when the Latin alternative movement becomes part of the American mainstream.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1996 | ENRIQUE LAVIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's "Soul Train" en espanol, the Latin "American Bandstand"--a television show featuring top musical acts of Spanish-speaking America with interludes of nightclub-style dancing. The show: "Mexicanisimo," a one-hour program taped in Anaheim and airing every Sunday at 6 p.m. on KWHY-TV Channel 22. The show frequently spotlights bands from Billboard Magazine's Top 40 Latin charts.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1997 | KEVIN BAXTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Telemundo and its Glendale-based flagship station, KVEA-TV Channel 52, will announce a major prime-time programming shake-up next month designed to make the network and its affiliates more competitive with Univision, the dominant force in Spanish-language broadcasting in the United States. Nationally, Telemundo stations will move their local newscasts up an hour to 10 p.m. beginning Aug. 11, positioning them as the earliest nightly Spanish-language news in most markets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2003 | Stephanie Stassel, Times Staff Writer
Growing up in war-torn El Salvador, Claudia Abrego followed the strife on television and in the newspapers. The coverage gripped her, inspiring her to become a Spanish-language journalist. Her family fled the civil war in 1989, when she was 14, and made a home in the United States.
NEWS
August 3, 2000 | DANA CALVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Never before has a Romance language been such a prominent part of a Republican National Convention. So many U.S. Spanish-language media outlets are chronicling the event--at least 20--that the presidential campaign of Texas Gov. George W. Bush has brought in a bilingual spin doctor to handle the unprecedented number. Convention organizers estimate that fewer than 10 outlets covered the 1996 GOP convention. Just one of the new outlets, the Web site Terra.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2004 | Roger Vincent, Times Staff Writer
A Los Angeles edition of the Spanish-language daily Hoy will be launched in March, Tribune Co. said Monday. The announcement came on the heels of a report last week that the parent companies of La Opinion, the dominant Spanish-language daily in Los Angeles, and El Diario/La Prensa, a New York newspaper published in Spanish, would join forces and expand their empire through acquisitions. Tribune already publishes editions of Hoy in Chicago and New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2000 | DANA CALVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A small group of TV broadcasters in this country have two careers to think about: one in English and one in Spanish. But the decision isn't just about language preference. It's about pay, fame and impact--juicy temptations that bilingual newscasters must choose between. Right now, a contract dispute at KFTV, the Fresno affiliate of a Spanish-language television network, has underscored the pros and cons of working in each language.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1999 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The influence of Southern California's growing Latino population--already reflected in the local ratings of Spanish-language radio--received a dramatic demonstration in television this week in the form of a top-rated performance by KMEX-TV. The Spanish-language UHF station beat all seven network-owned and independent stations occupying stronger VHF dial positions at 8 p.m. Monday, drawing the biggest audience in its history with the soap opera "La Usurpadora."
NEWS
August 15, 2002 | DANA CALVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although Los Angeles has the nation's largest Spanish-speaking population, broadcasters at Spanish-language stations here are paid significantly less than their counterparts at rival English-language stations, according to the first academic study of pay disparity in the local broadcast news business.
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