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NEWS
August 22, 2010
Domestic partners who treat each other with aggression are more likely to spank their children, according to a study released Sunday that is one of the first to analyze whether interpersonal violence or aggression between partners influences whether children in the household are smacked around too. Many American parents say they spank their kids and feel it is a justified and appropriate form of discipline. This is despite many studies that show spanking is ineffective as a way to discipline children.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2014
What do Ellen Page coming out, Lena Dunham going bare and spanking have to do with one another? All were fodder this week for The Takeaway, columnist Robin Abcarian's daily blog. Abcarian happened to be covering the Human Rights Campaign LGBT youth conference in Las Vegas on Friday when Page, the actress who made a splash as a pregnant teenager in the 2007 film “Juno” announced, with a tremendous amount of emotion , that she is gay. Abcarian and the Times' Ann Simmons talk about why the event made headlines.
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SPORTS
December 20, 2003
Ricardo Padilla [Viewpoint, Dec. 13] thinks USC "got spanked by a second-rate Cal team?" A road loss by a field goal in triple overtime is hardly getting spanked. A spanking would be more like a score of, say, 27-0, 52-21 or 47-22, as a UCLA alumnus should know. Michael J. Walsh Irvine
NATIONAL
February 19, 2014 | Maria L. La Ganga
Would a spanking proposal introduced by a Wichita lawmaker give Kansas teachers new leeway to rough up the state's schoolchildren? That's how some online reports have characterized the measure, which was introduced last week by Rep. Gail Finney -- ostensibly in an effort to reduce child abuse, not encourage it in the classroom. “Kansas bill would allow spanking that leaves marks,” screamed one headline. “Teachers could spank harder under bill pending in KS legislature,” warned another.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1998
Re "Spare the Rod, Spoil the Child," Voices, July 25: Parents hitting children teaches a child the wrong lessons: that it is OK to hurt the ones we love, if we feel it will teach them something (spousal abuse); that violence is justified, if the hitter is bigger and more powerful (battery, road rage); that the motivation for "good" behavior is to avoid pain (do whatever you want, but don't get caught). I have three children, also honors students and model citizens (the oldest enters Wesleyan University in the fall)
NEWS
September 4, 1994
Let me get this straight: The National Committee to Prevent Child Abuse asked parents if they hit or spanked their children within the past year, and they believe their findings? ("To Spank or Not to Spank?" Aug. 10). This survey has to be skewed. In light of such incidents as the Kivi case, who would admit to using physical punishment nowadays? I'm surprised that anyone admitted to spanking a child, let alone a whole 49%. It's more likely that 51% of the parental participants didn't want anyone to find out that last week, after repeated warnings and timeouts, Johnny ran into the street again and out of desperation Mommy spanked him. Parents today are guilt-ridden from these isolated incidents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2012 | Sandy Banks
The timing of the study's release was good - at the start of summer when kids running wild are bound to get on Mom and Dad's nerves. But its message wasn't necessarily something those harried parents will want to hear: If you spank your children, even occasionally, you're setting them up for a lifetime of mental and emotional distress. That's the conclusion of a study by researchers from two Canadian universities. They asked 35,000 American adults whether their parents had ever hit, grabbed, pushed, shoved or slapped them while they were growing up. Those who'd been physically punished, but not abused - about 2,100 of those surveyed - had a higher risk of personality disorders and substance abuse.
OPINION
January 24, 2007
Re "A spanking ban: Are we gonna get it?" Jan. 20 Assemblywoman Sally Lieber's (D-Mountain View) proposed anti-spanking bill is a step in the right direction for our state. It's absurd that California (rightly) deems it a human rights violation if, for example, a teacher punishes preschoolers by making them walk silently with their hands placed on their heads, yet when a parent strikes their child it is considered "good old-fashioned discipline." Spanking teaches children fear and violence, and it is almost always motivated by a parent's own impulsive anger rather than any real desire to modify behavior.
NEWS
January 27, 1999 | EDWARD WONG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After a debate that raised childhood memories, a City Council committee voted Tuesday to reject a proposal that would make Oakland the nation's first "no-spanking zone." The 2-1 vote by the Public Safety Committee reduced the likelihood that the full City Council would approve the idea pushed by retired college photography teacher Jordan Riak. Riak's proposal would carry no legal sanctions or punishment for adults who spank children.
MAGAZINE
June 24, 1990
Regarding "Doing the Right Thing," by Clancy Sigal (April 29): It is almost hilarious, but utterly appalling, that Young Americans for Freedom attack the ideology that provides them with license and the freedom to stand on their hind legs and howl. Were they alive at the time of the men who founded this country, these crankies would be soundly spanked, their mouths washed out with soap and sent back to King George's England for some further seasoning. This democracy is blessed in that it has not fallen prey to those who believe they are the only true patriots.
SCIENCE
October 21, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
To spank or not to spank: For most American parents, it isn't a question. The majority of U.S. children have been spanked at some time in their life, despite a robust body of evidence that suggests spanking a child leads to problems in the future.  The latest evidence of the negative effects of spanking comes from researchers at Columbia University. After analyzing data from more than 1,500 families, they found that children who are spanked in early childhood are not only more likely to be aggressive as older children, they are also more likely to do worse on vocabulary tests than their peers who had not been spanked.  The study was published this week in the journal Pediatrics.  While several studies have found a connection between spanking and aggressive behavior, the finding that spanking could be linked to cognitive ability is somewhat new. "Only a few studies have looked at the cognitive effects of spanking," said Michael MacKenzie, an associate professor at Columbia University and lead author of the study.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2013 | By Greg Braxton
From Seth MacFarlane and some other producers behind the hit "Family Guy," "Dads" is a new Fox comedy about the often-shaky dynamic between aging fathers and their adult sons who are horrified by their behavior and views. But the series was anything but a laughing matter to several reporters at TCA who found much of the show's cultural humor racist and offensive. What was designed as a promotional question and answer session became a contentious session surrounding the question of political correctness, with the show's producers and cast members on the defensive as reporters bashed them.
NEWS
July 30, 2013 | By Jay Jones
A parody of the wildly popular erotic novel "Fifty Shades of Grey," which deals with bondage and bad-boy-good-girl romance, will make its way -- fittingly -- this fall to the stage in Las Vegas. “ Spank! The Fifty Shades Parody ” will be staged Oct. 18 to Nov. 9 at the Golden Nugget Las Vegas .  The production “brings all the naughty fun of the best-selling book to life [including] steamy and fun performances from the hunky leading man,” a news release says. Like the book , the musical will probably appeal mostly to women.
NATIONAL
September 25, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
They're calling it the swat heard 'round the world -- and its echo is still reverberating. On Monday night, the school board in Springtown, Texas, voted to allow students to be paddled by employees of the opposite gender if their parents give written permission. The board's previous policy permitted only same-gender paddling. No one really argued with the idea of corporal punishment; at issue was the question of who gets to administer it, specifically can an adult male swat young girls?
NATIONAL
September 24, 2012 | By Matt Pearce
Unfortunately your browser does not support IFrames. On Monday night, officials at one Texas high school are meeting to discuss changing a rule that would allow male administrators to spank female students. That's right, spank. Nineteen states reportedly allow corporal punishment in schools, according to the Center for Effective Discipline, and Springtown High School is in one of those states. Further, at the school near Fort Worth, administrators are considering loosening their spanking rules because they believe the current rules have created a problem.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2012 | Sandy Banks
Since my column on spanking last weekend I've been mocked by old-school advocates of spare the rod, spoil the child. And I've been lectured by parents and therapists who blame spanking for crime and social ills. The only thing the two sides seem to have in common is absolute certainty that their way is the only right way to raise children. I wrote about a study in the journal Pediatrics that concluded that children who are physically punished by their parents — hit, slapped, grabbed or shoved — are more likely to suffer from mental and personality disorders as adults.
NATIONAL
June 9, 2012 | By Laura J. Nelson
Atlanta megachurch leader Creflo Dollar choked and punched his 15-year-old daughter, then spanked her with a shoe, during an argument over whether she could go to a party, according to a police report. Dollar told deputies he tried to restrain his daughter when she became disrespectful. When she began hitting back, the report said, he wrestled her to the floor and spanked her. Dollar, 50,  is one of the most prominent African American preachers in Atlanta, a well-known exponent of the prosperity gospel, which teaches followers that God will bless the faithful with material rewards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1985
Thank you for featuring Ben Sherwood's article on the illegality of spanking children in Sweden. Although I have long been disgusted with the way American parents abuse their children and get away with it by calling it necessary to parenting, it has never occurred to me that they were any different than parents anywhere. I have been aware of the occasional legal action taken by children against their abusive parents in California and have hoped that these precedents would send a message to those stupid people that they couldn't ignore.
OPINION
July 19, 2012
Re "Study fuels spanking debate," Column, July 14 I'm disappointed in Sandy Banks' rationalizations for hitting her children. In fact, there is no evidence-based debate over hitting or spanking children, any more than there's a debate over the link between tobacco use and cancer. Hitting (spanking) children is linked to a wide range of negative outcomes. Like Banks, I was hit as a child and vowed never to hit my own children. And like Banks, I ended up spanking my daughters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2012 | Sandy Banks
The timing of the study's release was good - at the start of summer when kids running wild are bound to get on Mom and Dad's nerves. But its message wasn't necessarily something those harried parents will want to hear: If you spank your children, even occasionally, you're setting them up for a lifetime of mental and emotional distress. That's the conclusion of a study by researchers from two Canadian universities. They asked 35,000 American adults whether their parents had ever hit, grabbed, pushed, shoved or slapped them while they were growing up. Those who'd been physically punished, but not abused - about 2,100 of those surveyed - had a higher risk of personality disorders and substance abuse.
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