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Spare Parts

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BUSINESS
May 14, 1985
Texas Instruments Inc. received a $17.6-million Air Force contract to produce spare parts for a laser target designation system.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2009
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NEWS
November 4, 1988 | United Press International
A draft report of an audit by the Pentagon's inspector general found today that 92% of the spare parts sampled at one of the five Air Force supply centers do not meet military specifications. "The Air Force did not receive the quality parts it paid for," Stephen A. Trodden, assistant inspector general for auditing, said. He concluded that the Pentagon's quality control program "needed improvement."
NATIONAL
June 3, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Space shuttle Discovery docked at the International Space Station, delivering a mammoth lab, spare parts for a balky toilet and two new occupants: a NASA astronaut and a Buzz Lightyear action figure. He was the character from the film "Toy Story" who yearned to blast off "to infinity and beyond." At Cape Canaveral, NASA began investigating damage to the launch pad.
BUSINESS
August 21, 1985
Northrop Corp. received a $12.2-million Air force contract for spare parts for the MX missile.
NEWS
October 14, 1987 | KAREN TUMULTY, Times Staff Writer
The Administration's secret sale of Hawk missile spare parts to Iran wiped out the U.S. stocks of 15 types of parts and significantly reduced the supplies of many others, the congressional committees investigating the Iran- contra affair disclosed Tuesday. Adm. William J. Crowe Jr., chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, told the House and Senate panels that the Pentagon's regular channels were bypassed in making the sale, which the White House had decided was "not a military matter."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1987 | RICH CONNELL, Times Staff Writer
After months of major computer failures, a breakthrough has been made in debugging an ultramodern parts-handling system at the RTD's new central warehouse, officials said Friday. That should be good news for transit commuters, who have been frustrated recently by record numbers of buses not showing up as scheduled because of a parts shortage caused by the warehouse problems.
NEWS
January 23, 1986 | From Reuters
The United States plans to sell Turkey $97 million in spare parts for military aircraft including F-100s, C-130s, F-4s, F-5s and F-104s, the Defense Department said Wednesday.
NEWS
December 14, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Rep. Bill Nichols, who had led a congressional investigation into high-priced Pentagon spare parts, died Tuesday after suffering a heart attack at his Capitol Hill desk. The Alabama Democrat, a 22-year veteran of the House, collapsed shortly after arriving at his office in the Rayburn House Office Building. An assistant, Flora Merchent, heard a noise "like something falling" and found her boss unconscious, said Tom McMahon, Nichols' press secretary.
NATIONAL
February 7, 2003 | Scott Gold, Times Staff Writer
With Columbia's destruction, NASA must operate with three space shuttles, and officials said Thursday they may be forced -- as a last resort -- to consider mothballing a spacecraft for spare parts just to cobble together an abbreviated launch schedule. The science behind what is known at Johnson Space Center as "the flow" -- the choreography of landing, servicing and launching NASA's fleet -- was complex enough when there were four space shuttles.
WORLD
November 5, 2007 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
A rhythmic clamor of pounding hammers, buzzing grinders and clanging metal reverberates from the stone gateway of Eritrea's oldest open-air market. At first glance, the dusty bazaar behind downtown Asmara appears to be little more than a sprawling junkyard of rusted car parts, broken appliances and scraps of steel. But this isn't where old metal comes to die. It comes to be reborn. Used artillery shells are recast as combs for beauty salons. Empty vegetable-oil tins morph into coffee pots.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2007 | Maeve Reston and Sara Lin, Times Staff Writers
A federal crackdown on the illegal sale of F-14 fighter jet parts to Iran led to the seizure of four privately owned military aircraft in San Bernardino County this week, after one jet owner surfaced in a sting operation to thwart the sale of an F-14 cockpit canopy, authorities said. As military technicians dismantled the fighters Wednesday at airports in Chino and Victorville, federal officials said the investigation was continuing and no criminal charges had yet been filed.
BUSINESS
May 2, 2006 | From Reuters
Boeing Co. said Monday that it agreed to buy aerospace parts supplier Aviall Inc. for $1.7 billion, as the plane maker looks to expand its services operations in the wake of a boom in new plane orders. The deal marks the first major corporate move by Boeing's chief executive, W. James McNerney Jr., who took the helm 10 months ago. Boeing is expanding its aviation services operations after a peak in commercial plane orders.
WORLD
November 5, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The United States recently sent replacement parts to Venezuela for U.S.-made warplanes, American officials said, denying claims that it had not honored a supply contract. President Hugo Chavez threatened this week to give Venezuela's F-16s to Cuba or China, because of what he said was Washington's failure to supply spare parts. But an embassy official said the U.S. had provided parts needed to maintain the safety of the F-16s.
WORLD
November 4, 2005 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
Tweaking already strained relations with the United States on the eve of a hemispheric summit, Venezuelan Vice President Jose Vicente Rangel said Thursday that his country would be within its rights in giving U.S.-made fighter jets to Cuba or China. The controversy over the planes, a fleet of 22 F-16s sold to a previous Venezuelan administration, began Tuesday when President Hugo Chavez complained that the U.S. had refused to sell him spare parts for the aging aircraft.
OPINION
July 29, 2003 | Nancy Scheper-Hughes, Nancy Scheper-Hughes, a professor of anthropology at UC Berkeley, is the director of Organs Watch. Her book, "The Ends of the Body: the Global Traffic in Organs," will be published by Farrar, Straus & Giroux next year.
Laudiceia Cristina da Silva, a young mother and office file clerk, sued the large public hospital in Sao Paulo, Brazil, where, in June 1997, during a routine operation to remove a small ovarian cyst, she emerged from anesthesia in great pain with a 17-inch scar across her side and minus her left kidney. Hospital officials insisted her "missing kidney" was embedded in the mass of tissue that had accumulated around her ovarian cyst. But the story was highly improbable.
OPINION
March 18, 2003 | Rajan Menon, Rajan Menon, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, is a professor of international relations at Lehigh University.
The world has been bracing for America's war against Saddam Hussein to begin. But in reality, it already has. Our war planners have always embraced Sun Tzu's counsel that the battle for the mind precedes the battle for the terrain. That's why American and British operatives have been inside Iraq for weeks -- collecting intelligence, bribing tribal chieftains, communicating the futility of resistance to Iraqi commanders.
NATIONAL
February 7, 2003 | Scott Gold, Times Staff Writer
With Columbia's destruction, NASA must operate with three space shuttles, and officials said Thursday they may be forced -- as a last resort -- to consider mothballing a spacecraft for spare parts just to cobble together an abbreviated launch schedule. The science behind what is known at Johnson Space Center as "the flow" -- the choreography of landing, servicing and launching NASA's fleet -- was complex enough when there were four space shuttles.
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