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Sparkling Wine

FOOD
December 30, 2009
On the off chance that more revelers than previously announced show up on your doorstep New Year's Eve, now is the time to lay in some inexpensive sparkling wine. And if you don't use it all, there will be plenty of occasions later in the year. Barcelona loves its Cava, the sparkling wine made in Sant' Sadurni south of the city. Though you could drink wonderful, sophisticated Cavas at Barcelona wine bars, until recently, much of those imported to this country were the cheaper, very rustic bubblies -- serviceable in a pinch, but nothing you'd go out of your way to drink.
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MAGAZINE
November 27, 1988 | ROBERT LAWRENCE BALZER
WHEN IT COMES to wine making, Mendocino County's fine reputation continues to expand. John Parducci's stalwart pioneering of quality wine; the Fetzers; the newcomer, Jepson Vineyards; plus a few small wineries such as Husch, Navarro, Lazy Creek, Handley Cellars, Christine Woods and Greenwood Ridge all are contributing to the growing reputation of Mendocino County and the Anderson Valley in premier wine-making circles.
FOOD
December 27, 1990 | DAN BERGER, TIMES WINE WRITER
New Year's Eve almost always means headaches the next morning. But it is possible to imbibe without the consequences. Now that the state of California considers you legally drunk with a .08% blood alcohol level, it's prudent to consider some of the following suggestions. --Nonalcoholic Beer: The technology to make these is improving and now a number of excellent ones exist. My favorites are Firestone from Santa Barbara and Clausthaler from Germany.
FOOD
December 12, 1985 | DANIEL P. PUZO, Times Staff Writer
Producing Champagne, in essence, involves making wine twice. Within this two-tiered process, there is an incredible array of choices available to each Champagne master. The numerous decisions, such as what grapes to use, the length of aging and the degree of sweetness, account for vast differences in the wine's style, taste and color. Certainly the most complex procedure for making wines that sparkle is through bottle fermentation, known as the classic French methode champenoise .
FOOD
September 16, 1993 | DAN BERGER, TIMES WINE WRITER
When most wine critics talk about matching food and wine, all they talk about is chi-chi foods. Not long ago I received a missive from Ken Forrester of Little Rock, Ark., asking why we can't make suggestions for wine that goes with the foods most Americans eat--fish sticks, hamburgers and tuna casserole. That got me to try various food and wine combinations to see what worked. The results of this informal investigation were interesting, though not definitive by any means.
FOOD
August 2, 1990 | DAN BERGER, TIMES WINE WRITER
Wine is a great stimulus of conversation, which is why I like being told I'm wrong about a wine. The discussion nearly always leads to better understanding--for one or the other of us. The fact is, you can't be wrong about what you like. If you like sweet red wine from Macedonia, fine--enjoy. It's not my cup of tea, but I'm not going to tell you you're wrong to like it.
FOOD
December 15, 1988 | DAN BERGER, Times Wine Writer
Time was, when an American President dined with a foreign head of state, the wine they toasted each other with would be Champagne from France. French Champagne is known worldwide as an exceptional beverage, not to mention good for smashing against bows of new boats, celebrating graduations or even cementing East-West agreements. But things change.
FOOD
July 13, 1989 | DAN BERGER, Times Wine Writer
The domination of the marketplace by Seagram's Cooler and Gallo's Bartles & Jaymes Cooler has led to a shifting of the big two's competitors. Calvin Cooler, owned by Hiram Walker-Allied Vintners, has been sold to Universal Brands Inc. of New York. Some months ago, Brown-Forman licensed its California Cooler, the first popular cooler and the U.S. leader until Gallo entered the scene, to Stroh Brewery Co. Stroh also markets a malt-based cooler called White Mountain Cooler.
BUSINESS
December 12, 1998 | MARTHA GROVE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For years now, the nation's consumption of sparkling wines has been flatter than a bad Brut. But next year, it is a foregone conclusion that legions of novices who have never tasted sparkling wine--along with millions of champagne sophisticates--will pop for bottles of bubbly to ring in 2000. Knowing this, or at least yearning for it, every sparkling wine maker worth her spit bucket is uncorking something special for the millennial countdown.
FOOD
December 22, 1991 | DAN BERGER, TIMES WINE WRITER
It's the bubbly season. Almost half of all sparkling wine sold in the United States is sold in the final three months of the year. In a recession, however, quality sparkling wine is a luxury few can afford. The best, meaning French Champagne, is terribly expensive, in part because of the weak U.S. dollar. Can you celebrate with $6 sparkling wine instead of Champagne? The Los Angeles Times tasting panel tried to determine that by blind tasting a range of sparkling wines designated "brut."
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