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Sparkling Wine

July 13, 1989 | DAN BERGER, Times Wine Writer
The domination of the marketplace by Seagram's Cooler and Gallo's Bartles & Jaymes Cooler has led to a shifting of the big two's competitors. Calvin Cooler, owned by Hiram Walker-Allied Vintners, has been sold to Universal Brands Inc. of New York. Some months ago, Brown-Forman licensed its California Cooler, the first popular cooler and the U.S. leader until Gallo entered the scene, to Stroh Brewery Co. Stroh also markets a malt-based cooler called White Mountain Cooler.
January 16, 1994 | Dan Berger
In the English tradition, steak off the grill calls for claret, which at the Grill means something like 1985 Chateau Talbot, $55, a decent wine that should work with the beef. Or try 1989 Chateau Greysac, a modest but decently rich red at $20. Still, most Californians prefer something brawnier, such as domestic Cabernet Sauvignon. The Grill offers two dozen Cabernets: Best bets are 1988 Silver Oak "Bonny's Vineyard," $35, or 1989 Caymus, $35.
August 28, 1987 | RUTH REICHL
Everything's pretty peachy in the south of France right now. I found on a recent visit peaches are popping up everywhere. Peaches perfume the air in all the grocery stores, prettify the plate on which your duck is presented, peer over the edge of every fruit basket. Grab a glass of Champagne and you suddenly discover that even your glass smells of peaches. The trendy new drink showing up everywhere is Brut de Peche--a peach libation far better than Bellinis.
December 29, 2004 | S. Irene Virbila
Previsionistes (that's what my Paris friend Luis calls those who anticipate the future) should have a few bottles of bubbly already tucked away -- for the new year, or any other suitable occasion. Those who do not, which is quite possibly most of us, should go shopping. Now. Don't wait for New Year's Eve when wine clerks' patience is running short and stocks are depleted. Here are a few to hunt down to ring in the new year or keep on hand for that unforeseen something to celebrate.
June 14, 2012
Re "Would rail project foul the air?," June 11 Where did America go? Where is the drive to build much needed infrastructure that creates jobs? It worked after the Great Depression. Regarding California's bullet train, you can continue to look for reasons not to build it, but that's not what made this country great. Once upon a time, California would not have thought twice about moving this project forward. Now you can't swing a dead cat without hitting someone who is trying to stall it. Yes, the environment will be affected slightly while the system is built.
It's the bubbly season. Almost half of all sparkling wine sold in the United States is sold in the final three months of the year. In a recession, however, quality sparkling wine is a luxury few can afford. The best, meaning French Champagne, is terribly expensive, in part because of the weak U.S. dollar. Can you celebrate with $6 sparkling wine instead of Champagne? The Los Angeles Times tasting panel tried to determine that by blind tasting a range of sparkling wines designated "brut."
November 27, 1988 | ROBERT LAWRENCE BALZER
WHEN IT COMES to wine making, Mendocino County's fine reputation continues to expand. John Parducci's stalwart pioneering of quality wine; the Fetzers; the newcomer, Jepson Vineyards; plus a few small wineries such as Husch, Navarro, Lazy Creek, Handley Cellars, Christine Woods and Greenwood Ridge all are contributing to the growing reputation of Mendocino County and the Anderson Valley in premier wine-making circles.
New Year's Eve almost always means headaches the next morning. But it is possible to imbibe without the consequences. Now that the state of California considers you legally drunk with a .08% blood alcohol level, it's prudent to consider some of the following suggestions. --Nonalcoholic Beer: The technology to make these is improving and now a number of excellent ones exist. My favorites are Firestone from Santa Barbara and Clausthaler from Germany.
Wine is a great stimulus of conversation, which is why I like being told I'm wrong about a wine. The discussion nearly always leads to better understanding--for one or the other of us. The fact is, you can't be wrong about what you like. If you like sweet red wine from Macedonia, fine--enjoy. It's not my cup of tea, but I'm not going to tell you you're wrong to like it.
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