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Sparky Anderson

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1999
Recently I visited Sparky Anderson at his hospital room in Thousand Oaks. I join thousands of fans in Ventura County, throughout Southern California and around the country--along with Sparky, his wife Carol and their family--in giving thanks for his splendid progress following bypass heart surgery. Sparky is a genuine treasure for the Conejo Valley. He is a good neighbor. He gives his support to many charitable causes. As has John Wooden in the realm of basketball, Sparky has given a good name to the world of baseball.
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SPORTS
October 29, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
San Francisco Giants Manager Bruce Bochy won his second World Series on Sunday when his Giants swept the Detroit Tigers. Bochy, perhaps the most underrated manager in the game, cemented his case for the Hall of Fame with the victory. Twenty-two managers in baseball history have won at least two World Series. Of those, nine won three or more and seven of those (Joe McCarthy, Casey Stengel, Connie Mack, Walt Alston, Sparky Anderson, Miller Huggins and John McGraw) are in the Hall of Fame.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1995 | KELLY DAVID
Retired Detroit Tigers Manager Sparky Anderson will discuss the leadership roles of athletes and sports celebrities in their communities at Cal Lutheran University on Monday. Before retiring this year at the end of the baseball season, Anderson managed the Cincinnati Reds in the 1970s and the Tigers from 1978 until his retirement. Highlights of his career include 2,171 victories, three World Series championships, five league pennants and seven division titles.
SPORTS
November 4, 2010 | Jerry Crowe
Sparky Anderson was so closely tied to the Cincinnati Reds and the Big Red Machine, it's surprising to realize that he managed the Detroit Tigers for nearly twice as many seasons. ? Wherever he managed, he was always fair, as he once noted in a cherished sound bite made famous by Jim Healy . ? Known as "Captain Hook" for pulling pitchers, Anderson also knew when to leave well enough alone: In the 1976 World Series, with the designated-hitter rule in effect for every game, the Dorsey High graduate utilized the same batting order for all four games as the Reds swept the New York Yankees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2000 | KATIE COOPER
Baseball Hall of Famer George "Sparky" Anderson will be honored by outgoing state Sen. Cathie Wright (R-Simi Valley) in a ceremony Thursday at Cal Lutheran University. Wright and Senate President John Burton (D-San Francisco), a longtime friend of Anderson, will present a resolution honoring the former major league manager's recent induction into the baseball Hall of Fame and his work on behalf of local sports programs.
SPORTS
June 19, 1988 | RICHARD L. SHOOK, United Press International
There are many measures of greatness. By most of them, Detroit Tigers' Manager Sparky Anderson measures up. Human being? You couldn't ask for a more thoughtful, considerate and compassionate person than George Anderson. That's the name he is known by without a baseball uniform on. "Off the field, he's always been the same," said one man who has known Anderson over the years, infielder Ray Knight of the Detroit Tigers.
SPORTS
July 2, 1995 | MIKE LUPICA, NEWSDAY
Maybe it is his last season, and the next time Sparky Anderson walks away from baseball he walks away for good. He will do this with his head high, a big guy to the end, after more than 2,000 wins, after winning the World Series in both leagues, after a career as a manager that puts him with immortals, and always will have him talked about with the best.
SPORTS
July 12, 1987 | Mike Downey
In the wacky and whimsical world of Sparky Anderson, the truth is meant to be bent. Fabrication is a useful managerial tool, same as a stolen base or a suicide squeeze. If a little white-haired lie can somehow make his boys play better baseball, or even give the public a little amusement, well, where's the harm? It won't make his nose grow as large as Pinocchio's, or Cyrano de Bergerac's, or Steve Martin's. The trick, of course, is figuring out when Sparky is sincere.
SPORTS
March 1, 2000 | RANDY HARVEY
A former manager who was essential to the Cincinnati Reds' World Series titles in 1975 and '76 and bet on baseball was elected to the Hall of Fame on Tuesday. Although George "Sparky" Anderson's gambling pursuits have not been as aggressively investigated or well chronicled as those of one of his former players, he has never denied that he bet Kirk Gibson $10 in the dugout during Game 5 of the 1984 World Series that San Diego's Goose Gossage would intentionally walk him.
SPORTS
August 14, 1988 | RICHARD JUSTICE, The Washington Post
He has the statistics in front of him, the lineup card in his hand and the clubhouse at his back. Yet, as Sparky Anderson attempts to explain this incredible thing called the Detroit Tigers, he does not reach for any of these pieces of physical evidence. Instead, he points toward his head, his stomach, his heart. He tugs at the familiar white jersey. The answer, he keeps saying, is somewhere else. "We create in our clubhouse a very great atmosphere," the Tigers' manager said.
SPORTS
June 19, 2009 | DYLAN HERNANDEZ, ON THE DODGERS
The names remain unknown. The results remain the same. The Dodgers' bullpen is still closing out games. The latest was a 3-2 victory over the Oakland A's on Thursday at Dodger Stadium that moved Manager Joe Torre past Sparky Anderson into fifth place on baseball's all-time win list with 2,195. Absent was the anchor of the otherwise anonymous group of arms that emerge from the gates behind left field, closer Jonathan Broxton, who missed his second consecutive game because of a sore toe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2000 | KATIE COOPER
Baseball Hall of Famer George "Sparky" Anderson will be honored by outgoing state Sen. Cathie Wright (R-Simi Valley) in a ceremony Thursday at Cal Lutheran University. Wright and Senate President John Burton (D-San Francisco), a longtime friend of Anderson, will present a resolution honoring the former major league manager's recent induction into the baseball Hall of Fame and his work on behalf of local sports programs.
SPORTS
July 24, 2000 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They are forever linked by the memorable World Series of 1975, and now they are forever linked in an even more meaningful way. Sparky Anderson, the manager of Cincinnati's Big Red Machine in '75, Tony Perez, his first baseman, and Carlton Fisk, the Boston Red Sox catcher who hit that dramatic home run in Game 6, were inducted into baseball's Hall of Fame on Sunday, the culmination of an improbable career journey for each, and a 25-year reunion of which Fisk said: "To have it come full circle . .
SPORTS
July 22, 2000 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At his favorite deli not far from the modest house that he and his wife, Carol, built in Thousand Oaks in 1967, Sparky Anderson was still trying to digest the fact that "a nobody who couldn't play the game is going into the Hall of Fame. It's wild. You start out as a kid with all these dreams, as kids should, and they have all come true. You couldn't ask for anything better."
NEWS
March 12, 2000 | MIKE DOWNEY
The car maker Edsel B. Ford II is on the phone. He is speaking of a silver-haired, 66-year-old retiree from Thousand Oaks who has been on the receiving end of lavish praise and pats on the back for a good week or so, having just been honored with a lifetime achievement award for his many outstanding contributions on the job. Ford, though, knows something else about this fellow. Something that has nothing to do with work.
SPORTS
March 1, 2000 | TIM BROWN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sparky Anderson, the manager whose folksy tales of baseball and life made him a latter-day Casey Stengel, was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame on Tuesday. Three hours after being notified by the electors of the Veterans Committee, Anderson was roundly cheered in the grill at Sunset Hills Country Club in Thousand Oaks, where he is a member. Later, when he ticked off the benefits of induction, five more handicap strokes from his regular foursome was high on the list. "You got it!"
SPORTS
July 16, 1995 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sparky Anderson squeezes a pinch of tobacco into his pipe, leans back, lights up and revels in each relaxing puff. He looks so content you'd swear his uniform and cleats were a robe and slippers, his lineup card an afternoon paper and the Detroit Tiger bench a family-room recliner. "This is where I'm most comfortable, at the park," said Anderson, the 61-year-old Tiger manager. "I truly love to manage. It's like opening a door and walking outside--for some reason, it's always been easy for me.
SPORTS
March 1, 2000 | RANDY HARVEY
A former manager who was essential to the Cincinnati Reds' World Series titles in 1975 and '76 and bet on baseball was elected to the Hall of Fame on Tuesday. Although George "Sparky" Anderson's gambling pursuits have not been as aggressively investigated or well chronicled as those of one of his former players, he has never denied that he bet Kirk Gibson $10 in the dugout during Game 5 of the 1984 World Series that San Diego's Goose Gossage would intentionally walk him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1999
Recently I visited Sparky Anderson at his hospital room in Thousand Oaks. I join thousands of fans in Ventura County, throughout Southern California and around the country--along with Sparky, his wife Carol and their family--in giving thanks for his splendid progress following bypass heart surgery. Sparky is a genuine treasure for the Conejo Valley. He is a good neighbor. He gives his support to many charitable causes. As has John Wooden in the realm of basketball, Sparky has given a good name to the world of baseball.
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