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NEWS
September 25, 1992 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Step carefully around the cow droppings as you head down the rutted dirt path, towel in hand, for your 10-minute curative bath in the "miraculous" mineral waters of the Kuldur Spa. A flimsy-looking statue of V. I. Lenin, painted a tinny shade of silver, points you toward the crumbling pink building that houses several dozen baths. Under the dim yellow light inside, you strip off your clothes in a frosted-glass cubicle and turn the rusty taps. A cockroach scurries along the wall.
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HEALTH
July 13, 2013 | By Alene Dawson
If you are looking for a spiritual experience at a spa, think about what spirituality means to you. "Spirituality means different things to different people," says Susie Ellis, president of the marketing company SpaFinder Wellness. "Today a spa treatment or a getaway with a spiritual component is often centered on helping people cope with record levels of stress and achieve inner peace or balance. " Here are some spots in Southern California that offer spirituality-related treatments.
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NEWS
November 2, 1990 | CINDY LaFAVRE YORKS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Spa enthusiasts who can't always take off for a week--or don't have the cash for a major trip--now have an easy alternative: department store spas. These spas (treatment centers for face and body) are worlds apart from salons where hairdressers and nail- and skin-care technicians share common quarters. These spas are calm, tranquil--and used for skin care only.
HEALTH
July 13, 2013 | By Alene Dawson
Spa fans want more than sloughing off dead skin or soothing aching muscles from those pampering places of eucalyptus-scented bliss. And businesses are transforming into mind, body and soul temples of wellness to meet the demands of people increasingly eschewing traditional houses of worship and pursuing alternative paths to spiritual connection. "Spas can be inspirational places where I've seen many people have transformational experiences. With people not going as much to church, spas are a natural place to have some of these experiences," says Susie Ellis, who has worked 40 years in the spa industry and is president of SpaFinder Wellness, a marketing company.
NEWS
December 18, 1985 | Associated Press
The Federal Trade Commission voted unanimously today to abandon regulations it had considered imposing on the health spa industry for a decade. Acting Chairman Terry Calvani and Commissioners Patricia Bailey and Mary Azcuemaga voted to end the effort to regulate the nation's 6,000 spas as unnecessary. "The commission will continue to monitor the health spa industry and to challenge, where appropriate, illegal practices," Calvani said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1989 | From Associated Press
Bobbing in the big, old-fashioned tub, toes hooked over a water spout to keep from capsizing as tiny bubbles effervesce up the length of a sore spine, it's hard to worry whether this is just what the doctor ordered. "If you don't have anything wrong with you, if you lead a strenuous life, it's just for relaxation," said bathhouse attendant Gertrude Zorn. Otherwise, said Zorn, who for 15 years has been drawing the water for the tub and returning to wrap the client in a hot sheet when it's time to get out, the bubbly float on naturally carbonated water is good for arthritis, rheumatism and bad backs.
NEWS
August 19, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Women in the first month of pregnancy should stay out of hot tubs and spas to protect their fetuses from developing birth defects, physicians warned Tuesday. Women who are exposed to such heat sources early in pregnancy have two to three times the normal risk of bearing a child with spina bifida or other so-called neural tube defects, according to a report in today's Journal of the American Medical Assn. The finding appears to confirm earlier but unsubstantiated reports and anecdotal evidence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1991 | JESSE KATZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It had been years since Len Price changed the water in his swimming pool, a 35,000-gallon rectangle that was gradually becoming encrusted with calcium. But with mandatory rationing set to begin Friday for Los Angeles residents, the 52-year-old meat salesman suddenly found the motivation he needed. "I figured it was now or never," said Price, who began refilling the pool earlier this week. "Who knows when you'll be able to do it again."
NEWS
June 5, 2003 | Brenda Rees, Special to The Times
WITH work, freeway traffic and the tensions of everyday life, it's been a hard day. It's time to step into a world of pure, luxurious pampering -- a place where worries can be kneaded, scrubbed and rubbed away. Here, feet are lavishly massaged, legs are soaked, bodies are wrapped and hands are dipped in paraffin. Gentle, soothing music plays. The scent of ancient oils and herbs cleanses the air. It's a place of calm and serenity. It's ... your living room?
WORLD
July 17, 2011 | By Benjamin Haas, Los Angeles Times
In his twilight years, Zhang Shan has simplified his daily schedule to the bare essentials: Wake up, eat breakfast, walk to Shuangxing Bathhouse and undress. The bathhouse, on the southern outskirts of the Chinese capital, is a remnant of a time long past when homes here lacked plumbing and all bathing was communal. The bathhouse was also a social gathering point where men flocked to sweat, talk politics and relax. But now, local authorities with an eye toward redevelopment appear intent on demolishing what is believed to be the last traditional public bathhouse in Beijing and the social culture that emanates from it. Zhang, 67, used to commute more than an hour by public bus to fulfill his daily ritual, but two years ago he moved within walking distance.
IMAGE
December 23, 2012 | By Alene Dawson, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The holidays are the season of sparkle. And that goes for beauty treatments as well as for Christmas trees. Spas and beauty companies are capitalizing on the allure of jewels and precious metals, hoping to harness radiance and a feeling of indulgence by adding gold, gemstones or diamonds to their products. "The purpose of diamonds in skin care is primarily for anti-aging. White diamond powder has very little therapeutic value," says dermatological chemist Ben Kaminsky, founder and chief executive of B. Kamins skin care.
TRAVEL
July 8, 2012 | By Catharine Hamm, Los Angeles Times
A frequently asked question: I'm going on vacation. What do I do with the dog? My mother says if I foist him off on her, she's divorcing me. Answer: A mother can't divorce a child. I know this is true because mine would have done it if it were possible. Legal action aside, you probably may need other loving hands to care for Fido. I used to think my dog was a dog until I realized she was a boa constrictor, squeezing the very financial life out of me. Dogs may be man's best friend, but they also can seem like man's biggest expense, and that's before the food, toys, accouterments, never mind the preventive veterinary care that mostly prevented me from going on the trips of my dreams.
BUSINESS
May 3, 2012 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
With the summer pool season approaching, a battle is brewing between advocates for disabled Americans and hotel owners over how to make public swimming pools more accessible to people with disabilities. At the center of the dispute is a new regulation that requires hotels and recreation centers that operate public pools and spas to install or order permanent lifts - costing between $2,500 and $6,500 each, plus installation - by May 21. The requirement also can be satisfied by pool ramps, which are much more expensive.
TRAVEL
March 25, 2012 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
It's a dry heat - a boulder-studded, wind-raked Mojave heat, in which rock stars lie low, artists think big, marines train, weird plants jut toward the sun like beseeching biblical figures, and climbers cling to granite walls like insects stuck to flypaper, except the climbers are way happier. That's a notable thing about Joshua Tree National Park and the towns around it. While legions of Californians keep their faces to the beach, no matter the season, a certain stripe of traveler is powerless to resist the desert, especially in cooler months.
TRAVEL
February 26, 2012 | By Amanda Jones, Special to the Los Angeles Times
This is for those who don't mind traveling to Earth's edge to get somewhere extraordinary. Broome is in the Kimberley, a hunk of Western Australia the size of California but whose population is only 41,000 hide-skinned, Akubra-sporting (you know, the iconic hat) individuals. It also has some of the country's whitest sand, warmest waters, reddest cliffs and most outlandish geological formations. And those hide-skinned people are almost bizarrely kind. Without fail, if you pull over to look at a map, take a photo or argue with your navigator, they stop their car to ask, "Youse alroight?"
BUSINESS
February 12, 2012 | By Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times
Amid the squeal of machinery and the hiss of plastic being molded, the Pomona factory owned by LMS Inc. turns out a signature California creation: the hot tub. But the squealing and hissing have slowed in recent years, so much so that company President Casey Loyd says the operation these days is less like an assembly line and more like a hospital where "all kinds of babies are coming out at all different times," each a custom job. "We don't...
NEWS
July 20, 1992 | SUSAN CHRISTIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Somehow, it's fitting. Here in the epicenter of the buffed and tummy-tucked stand two of the nation's most spectacular health clubs--facing one another across the San Diego Freeway, mirror monuments to Southern California's preoccupation with appearance. First came the $30-million Sports Club--a 125,000-square-foot spa with such amenities as a basketball court, swimming pool, rock-climbing wall, child care center and restaurant.
TRAVEL
September 27, 1998 | SUSAN SPANO TIMES TRAVEL WRITER
When the Mormon leader Brigham Young developed rheumatism in the later part of his life, he built himself a winter retreat near this town. Here three great deserts--the Mojave, the Great Basin and the Colorado Plateau--converge in a desolate but stunning landscape bringing to mind the region around the Dead Sea. In summer St. George is a furnace, with daytime temperatures routinely topping 100 degrees. But the rest of the year, the climate is warm, dry and easy on ailing joints, as Young found.
WORLD
July 17, 2011 | By Benjamin Haas, Los Angeles Times
In his twilight years, Zhang Shan has simplified his daily schedule to the bare essentials: Wake up, eat breakfast, walk to Shuangxing Bathhouse and undress. The bathhouse, on the southern outskirts of the Chinese capital, is a remnant of a time long past when homes here lacked plumbing and all bathing was communal. The bathhouse was also a social gathering point where men flocked to sweat, talk politics and relax. But now, local authorities with an eye toward redevelopment appear intent on demolishing what is believed to be the last traditional public bathhouse in Beijing and the social culture that emanates from it. Zhang, 67, used to commute more than an hour by public bus to fulfill his daily ritual, but two years ago he moved within walking distance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 2011 | By Maria L. LaGanga and Dan Weikel, Los Angeles Times
Cheryle and Ernest Chin were anxious about getting home to Australia, and American Airlines wasn't making it easy. The massage therapist and her real estate developer husband had started out three days earlier in Brazil; they were still thousands of miles away, and the shortest flight of their multicontinent odyssey had just been canceled — San Francisco to Los Angeles. Photos: San Francisco International But for two people on a forced seven-hour layover, the Chins looked remarkably relaxed.
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