Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSpatial
IN THE NEWS

Spatial

FEATURED ARTICLES
MAGAZINE
February 25, 1990
Dagny Corcoran's house, as designed by Gregory Evans ("Living Color," by Barbara Thornburg, Jan. 7), reminded me of the old saying, "Paint the cell red and drive the prisoner mad." Although I admire Evans' bold statement, I see interior design in the 1990s as more restrained and introspective, in response to a new respect for human rights stimulated by the events taking place in Eastern Europe. Contrary to Evans' design, the interior spatial experience would be "progression" rather than "inundation."
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
February 26, 2012 | By Lew Sichelman
Among new Internet-based real estate ventures to pop up in recent months is one that enables house hunters to simultaneously search for just about every lifestyle criteria imaginable. Another protects would-be tenants from unwittingly renting from a struggling owner in the midst of a foreclosure. SpatialMatch.com, an overlay technology that can be embedded on an agent's website or perhaps on an entire multiple listing service, enables buyers to pursue properties using any number of lifestyle criteria.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2004
I found your article by Mary McNamara on video game effects very interesting and am glad that the L.A. Times takes an interest in the potential constructive outcomes of game play ("A PhD in Mortal Kombat," June 6). While much of the past research has been about violent content, as indicated in your article, there have also been promising lines of research in the cognitive area. Dr. Patricia Greenfield, a UCLA researcher, conducted seminal research in this area that was published in a special issue of the Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology a decade ago. Among other findings, she documented that playing video games cultivates visual spatial skills.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2009 | David C. Nichols; Philip Brandes
Ray Bradbury's venerated work in the science fiction genre can overshadow the comic side of his talent. Such is the gentle appeal of "The Wonderful Ice Cream Suit" at Fremont Centre Theatre. This resourcefully appointed Pandemonium Theatre Company revival of Bradbury's tickling parable about five Latinos who yearn for the title apparel is as light as a scoop of vanilla, with just enough unforced spice to maintain its pertinence. First presented as part of a 1965 trilogy, "Ice Cream Suit" became a free-standing effort in 1972, produced by the Organic Theatre of Chicago.
HOME & GARDEN
October 16, 2003
There's nothing like being released from the past full of possessions ("Modernism, in a Whole New Light," Oct. 2). In my Richard Neutra house, I feel so free to take in the light and air of early fall bursting forth. I'm proud to call myself a modernist. I'm neither post- nor neo- but a genuine modernist who traveled east to study with Martha Graham, then returned to California to flourish under the guidance of Neutra, my architect. His spaces didn't order me around. Instead, they taught me the importance of spatial awareness, as did Graham with her movements.
REAL ESTATE
July 4, 1999
Regarding the story headlined "Poll Finds Home Buyers Prefer Simple Pleasures" (by Kenneth R. Harney, June 20), I don't know if it was intentional or not, but you've discredited most of the so-called urban planners and social engineers who litter your opinion pages on a regular basis. Personally I'm getting a little tired of pointy-headed professional hand-wringers accusing me of contributing to modern evils such as "suburban sprawl," "spatial greed," "gridlock," "isolationism" and destruction of "community" because I don't interact with my neighbors.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2009 | David C. Nichols; Philip Brandes
Ray Bradbury's venerated work in the science fiction genre can overshadow the comic side of his talent. Such is the gentle appeal of "The Wonderful Ice Cream Suit" at Fremont Centre Theatre. This resourcefully appointed Pandemonium Theatre Company revival of Bradbury's tickling parable about five Latinos who yearn for the title apparel is as light as a scoop of vanilla, with just enough unforced spice to maintain its pertinence. First presented as part of a 1965 trilogy, "Ice Cream Suit" became a free-standing effort in 1972, produced by the Organic Theatre of Chicago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1999
Spatializer Audio Laboratories Inc., Woodland Hills, reported net income for the third quarter ended Sept. 30 of $33,000 compared to a net loss of $1.1 million for the same period last year. Revenues dipped to $324,000 from $390,000. The company develops and markets audio technologies for the consumer electronics, computing and entertainment industries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1999
By agreement with Nasdaq, the common stock of Spatializer Audio Laboratories Inc. has been delisted from trading because of the company's continued failure to meet the net tangible asset and minimum bid price requirements for continued listing, the Woodland Hills-based company has reported. The company reported Dec.
BUSINESS
June 13, 1995
Spatializer Audio Laboratories, a Woodland Hills developer of advanced audio technologies, announced that it plans to raise $874,000 through a private placement of its common stock, which trades on the Vancouver Stock Exchange. The company said it will sell 350,000 "units," composed of one common stock share and one-quarter share of a purchase warrant, at a price of $3.45 each. Holders of one purchase warrant will be able to buy an additional share of stock for $3.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2006 | David Pagel, Special to The Times
Lavi Daniel is a meat and potatoes painter. At the Armory Center for the Arts, a mid-career overview of his works on canvas, panel and paper is true to the ethos at the heart of his art. Organized by guest curator Anne Ayres, "Parables of Space: Lavi Daniel: A Twenty-Four-Year Survey" puts substance ahead of style.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2006 | Irene Lacher, Special to The Times
THE one thing people always say about Simon Abkarian is that there's something in the way he moves. When the noted French Armenian actor starred in Sally Potter's 2005 film in verse, "Yes," movie critic Karen Durbin exulted in his physical presence, calling it "a visual feast." Now Abkarian is bringing some of his loose-limbed elegance to the Actors' Gang new home in Culver City, where he's directing a production of "Love's Labor's Lost," which opens Saturday.
HOME & GARDEN
November 3, 2005 | Lili Singer, Special to The Times
KATHLEEN IRVINE moves carefully past tufts of New Zealand hair sedge that flank the skinny path, ducks under the silver-leafed willow wattle and unlatches the tall gate. Then it's a few paces to an elegant, raised redwood deck with extra-large steps that double as seating, overlooking a Lilliputian landscape of dwarf trees and grasses, thread-leaf nandina, mossy rocks and a "Stickman" sculpture cooling his heels in a burbling stream.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2005 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
While surround sound seems to have caught on with film fans, classical listeners have been stubbornly resistant -- at least at home, where the idea of hearing the music in front of you, not all around the room, remains the standard. Likewise, Walt Disney Concert Hall, Frank Gehry's gift to surround-sound buffs, usually sits waiting for someone to take advantage of its spatial layout. Few have.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2005 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
In the early 1990s, Merce Cunningham began to use computer software as a preliminary stage in the choreographic process, eventually transferring or adapting for his dancers the moves he originated with animated figures. This new way of working created a major shift in his technique -- one made especially clear at the Ahmanson Theatre on Saturday, when the Cunningham company performed a piece from 1987 on the same two-part program as one from 2003.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2004 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Four works, all written since 2000, opened this season's first Green Umbrella concert by the Los Angeles Philharmonic New Music Group on Monday night. Three, exotic of sound and captivating, were by emerging young composers and dealt with time and place, with history. The fourth, and curiously the most timely, was concerned only with space and place. At 91, Henry Brant is focused on the here and now, and on the hear and now. He is a utopian who has pioneered individuality through spatial music.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2000
Spatializer Audio Laboratories of Woodland Hills reported net income of $104,000 for the third quarter ended Sept. 30, a 215% increase over net income of $33,000 for the same period last year. Revenue rose 94% to $630,000 over $324,000. Spatializer develops, licenses and markets next-generation technologies for computers, consumer electronics and entertainment industries.
BOOKS
January 28, 1990 | Thomas Cahill, Cahill, former North American education correspondent for the Times (London), is editor of "The Bookperson," a new mail-order book review. and
Aproper dilemma needs two horns; and, it would appear from Howard Gardner's provocative new book, the dilemma of contemporary education is no exception. The horns, in this case, are freedom and discipline. The question before the house is how to incorporate both into one's educational scheme without slighting either.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2004
I found your article by Mary McNamara on video game effects very interesting and am glad that the L.A. Times takes an interest in the potential constructive outcomes of game play ("A PhD in Mortal Kombat," June 6). While much of the past research has been about violent content, as indicated in your article, there have also been promising lines of research in the cognitive area. Dr. Patricia Greenfield, a UCLA researcher, conducted seminal research in this area that was published in a special issue of the Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology a decade ago. Among other findings, she documented that playing video games cultivates visual spatial skills.
MAGAZINE
May 16, 2004 | Barbara Thornburg, Barbara Thornburg is senior editor of Home/Design for the magazine.
Architect Glen Irani had wanted a pool ever since he was a kid. When he purchased a property along the Venice canals to build a new home 2 1/2 years ago, he wasn't sure if he would be able to have one. The challenge: to fit both a spacious new home and pool on the long, narrow, 30-by-95-foot lot. He resolved the problem with a design that suspended part of the home above the pool using slender steel columns.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|