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Speaker Jim Wright

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NEWS
April 19, 1989 | From United Press International
Democrat Glen Browder of Alabama was sworn in Tuesday as the newest member of the House, replacing veteran Rep. Bill Nichols (D-Ala.), who died in December. Browder, 45, who won a special election on April 4 to take the 3rd District seat, was accompanied by his family, Alabama's senators and the state's House delegation when he took the oath of office from Speaker Jim Wright (D-Tex.).
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NEWS
June 12, 1989
Members of the House Ethics Committee, not former Speaker Jim Wright, initiated an attempt to strike a deal and negotiate his resignation, the Dallas Times Herald reported. The newspaper reported that sources who asked not to be named said that Ethics Committee Chairman Julian C. Dixon (D-Los Angeles) phoned Rep. Louis Stokes (D-Ohio), the former ethics chairman, and said that Wright's resignation would "spare the House a harsh and divisive confrontation." Wright reportedly authorized negotiations but did not approach the committee to discuss a deal when it convened later.
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NEWS
September 29, 1988
The House Intelligence Committee, in a straight party line vote, refused a request by Republican members to provide classified information to the Ethics Committee that could clarify whether Speaker Jim Wright (D-Tex.) violated House rules in discussing what he said were CIA attempts to destabilize the government of Nicaragua. Wright told reporters last week that he had "clear testimony" from the spy agency that U.S.
NEWS
June 11, 1989 | JOSH GETLIN, Times Staff Writer
For years he has been the bad boy of the Republican Right, the congressman whose roughhouse partisanship has delighted conservatives and enraged Democrats. But now, having led the crusade to topple Speaker Jim Wright, Rep. Newt Gingrich of Georgia is on the defensive, beset by many of the forces he helped set in motion. Gingrich, who rode the ethics issue to become assistant House Republican leader, is battling charges that, like Wright, he profited unethically from a book deal financed by campaign contributors.
NEWS
May 5, 1989
Charges against Speaker Jim Wright (D-Tex.) will probably go to trial before the House Ethics Committee late this month and will take seven to 10 days to complete, the panel's chairman, Julian C. Dixon (D-Los Angeles), said. Unless there is agreement between the lawyers for Wright and the committee to do otherwise, the process will begin with a presentation of witnesses and other evidence by the committee's special outside counsel, Richard J. Phelan. Wright's lawyer will then have a chance to offer rebuttal evidence and bring Wright to the stand for a personal defense.
NEWS
May 25, 1989 | From United Press International
Speaker Jim Wright said today that "there is no deal" with the House Ethics Committee for his resignation and that there will be none, adding that he has waited a year to tell his side of the controversy. In a statement distributed by his office, the Texas Democrat said he did not meet with any emissary of the Ethics Committee, "nor did I ever offer to resign in return for any arrangement with the committee." He said friends "on both sides" had initiated discussions to assess the situation, "apparently trying to save the House from what they saw as a harsh and divisive confrontation.
NEWS
April 27, 1989 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
The House Ethics Committee may vote contempt charges against five balking witnesses in its investigation of Speaker Jim Wright (D-Tex.), the top-ranking Republican member of the panel said Wednesday. "That's one option," Rep. John T. Myers (R-Ind.) told reporters after the subpoenaed witnesses failed to show up for questioning Tuesday in San Antonio. The committee will meet today to consider further action. The challenge to the committee's authority will delay a hearing for Wright that the Speaker requested immediately, Myers said.
NEWS
April 27, 1989 | From United Press International
The House Ethics Committee ruled today that reluctant witnesses who earlier refused to testify about an oil well deal profiting Speaker Jim Wright (D-Tex.) must comply with the panel's subpoenas and appear before the committee next week. If the witnesses again refuse, the committee will take "whatever appropriate action is necessary," including possibly issuing contempt of Congress citations, Chairman Julian C. Dixon (D-Los Angeles) told reporters after a closed meeting of the committee.
NEWS
June 6, 1989 | From Associated Press
The House of Representatives elevated Thomas S. Foley of Washington to be the 49th Speaker in its history today, and he immediately appealed to both parties to "put away bitterness" after months of turmoil that led to the resignation of Speaker Jim Wright. Foley promised to help return tranquility to a House that has been ripped by charges and counter-charges of ethical impropriety, and to put ethics reform on his list of priorities for the year. "I am a proud Democrat," Foley declared to the full House after he was elected and sworn in. He appealed to Republicans as well as his own party to "come together and put away bitterness and division and hostility."
OPINION
June 4, 1989 | Richard E. Cohen, Richard E. Cohen covers Congress for the National Journal
The sense of power and decisiveness that surrounded Tony Coelho's political life was never more apparent than when he departed it. He identified his problem and confronted its political consequences. He decided, himself, to make his break from the House. Then he announced the startling and surely traumatic decision to resign on his own terms. That was the way Coelho (D-Merced) accomplished a meteoric rise into the House power structure, first as chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee and then as majority whip.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1989
As an institution that changes leaders only a little more often than the Church chooses new Popes, the U.S. House of Representatives truly was stunned by Rep. Tony Coelho's announcement that he would resign rather than suffer through an investigation of his personal finances. As ambitious as Coelho may be, this congressional meteor of the 1980s is not going to cling to his No. 3 House leadership post and his Merced-based seat like a dying ember, seeking vainly to salvage pride and reputation.
NEWS
May 25, 1989 | From United Press International
Speaker Jim Wright said today that "there is no deal" with the House Ethics Committee for his resignation and that there will be none, adding that he has waited a year to tell his side of the controversy. In a statement distributed by his office, the Texas Democrat said he did not meet with any emissary of the Ethics Committee, "nor did I ever offer to resign in return for any arrangement with the committee." He said friends "on both sides" had initiated discussions to assess the situation, "apparently trying to save the House from what they saw as a harsh and divisive confrontation.
NEWS
May 19, 1989 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
As tension mounted over Speaker Jim Wright's political future, the House Ethics Committee announced Thursday that it would hear arguments and rule next week on his motions to dismiss two major charges. The panel decided to allow television coverage of pleadings by attorneys for Wright and its own special counsel, Richard J. Phelan, Tuesday at its first public session in the case against the Texas Democrat. Committee Chairman Julian C. Dixon (D-Los Angeles) said that he expects a decision to be issued a day or two later.
NEWS
May 18, 1989 | JOSH GETLIN, Times Staff Writer
Breaking a long silence, House Minority Leader Robert H. Michel (R-Ill.) charged Wednesday that the ethics investigation of Speaker Jim Wright has left the House in a "state of suspended animation," without strong leadership. Shortly before Democrats again failed to overcome Republican objections to an emergency funding bill, Michel said that the House is "moving at a snail's pace" and failing to make progress on major legislation because Wright has been so preoccupied with his mounting legal and ethics problems.
NEWS
May 11, 1989 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
In a new setback for Speaker Jim Wright, the House Ethics Committee decided Wednesday to expand its investigation of an unusual Texas oil well deal that gave him a quick profit of $340,000 last year, although other investors in the well still have not made any money from it. The panel apparently was not satisfied with an explanation of the complex transaction provided last week by Morris D. Jaffe, a San Antonio financier and veteran Democratic Party...
NEWS
May 5, 1989
Charges against Speaker Jim Wright (D-Tex.) will probably go to trial before the House Ethics Committee late this month and will take seven to 10 days to complete, the panel's chairman, Julian C. Dixon (D-Los Angeles), said. Unless there is agreement between the lawyers for Wright and the committee to do otherwise, the process will begin with a presentation of witnesses and other evidence by the committee's special outside counsel, Richard J. Phelan. Wright's lawyer will then have a chance to offer rebuttal evidence and bring Wright to the stand for a personal defense.
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